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>> Home > Tags > plasticard

plasticard
plasticard
The deck planking. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Hi Mike. I chose to use .8mm black plasticard after doing a test pieces with it and comparing it with another using card and I found the plasticard far easier to cut and fix, and it trims very neatly with a sharp chisel. No special primer required at all, the obeche strip is stained with several coats of teak water based stain and finished with a couple of coats of satin acrylic lacquer. It was great to meet you at Ally Pally on Saturday and compare notes on Crash Tenders, I hope you enjoyed your day out to London. Very Best. Rob.

The deck planking. by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Once again a piece of precision planking, the end product is always dependant on good planning and preparation, I used black card as my caulking (its available in a variety of thicknesses) and my thought was that it would not require any special pre- treatment other than sanding sealer and lacquer. Does the plasticard need a plastic primer?

The deck planking. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
The kit I’m constructing is a pre-production prototype and consequently it does not have the ‘laser etched planking’ feature that has been subsequently introduced in the final production kits on the ‘upper’ deck and the ‘well’ deck. This is of no concern to me because I think I prefer to do my own planking anyway but I do have to do a bit of preparatory ‘laying out’ of the deck pattern to ensure that it’s symmetrical and laid in a pleasing fashion. I have chosen to use 1.6 mm x 9.5 mm obeche hardwood strip-wood (from SLEC) for this with a thin black plasticard caulking between the planks. This is what I did when I constructed the VMW Fire Tender and the result was very effective and visually pleasing. Obeche has a pleasing grain, takes stain very easily and is also considerably cheaper than mahogany which I feel would be far too ‘dark red’ when finally lacquered. Because I wanted an outer curved plank around the hull edge I had to cut this from 1.6mm obeche sheet to the correct shape and width as it would be impossible to bend a strip to this extreme curve. These also needed a section trimmed out to allow the bow gunwales to be positioned correctly. Once both sides were cut and shaped I could then form the ply gunwales to the correct curve by my heating and bending process and glued them down to the deck. I understand that on the production kits these gunwales are now incorporated into the side skins which will make the construction a bit easier. The remaining outer planks on the hull edges were made from straight lengths of obeche but required some easing cuts so that they could be bent to the curve of the hull. Hopefully these cuts will not be too noticeable in the finished deck. When all the edge planks were glued in place I temporarily laid out the obeche planking strips with a thin strip of black plasticard as caulking and all held in place with masking tape. The centre plank was arranged to lie over the centre line from bow to stern. The setting out of the planks in this manner confirmed that the layout worked as intended and so I began fixing down the planking from the centre plank of the hull outwards with a fast bonding superglue and the process proved to be quite quick to complete. The side deck planks were equally straightforward but did require some to be carefully shaped in a tapered fashion at each end to fill the remaining gaps. The rear deck was also planked by working out from the centre plank and thankfully the planking layout matched and followed the bow deck planking perfectly. The surplus plasticard ‘caulking’ was then trimmed flush to the planks with a very sharp chisel and the entire deck rubbed down with my sanding plate until it was all perfectly smooth. For those building this model that don’t feel confident enough to do ‘real planking’ will probably want to make use of the laser etched planking on the ply deck panels to achieve a similar result with very minimal effort, but I quite like the challenge of doing it the hard way and the benefit of a slightly better finish.

Pretend deck planking by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Steve, take a look here at some real 'woodies', may give some idea of the variety of plank lengths. https://www.pinterest.de/pin/AbSBn80zTTthyPYzCjiWxssgNMPM0f2... Deck plank 'joggling'😉 See pic https://www.pinterest.de/pin/332281278754154088/ Happy bending, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW: 5x0.5mm is precisely the size of the mahogany strip I have for the deck planks on my fish cutter. Fortunately STRAIGHT!! I might go for thick black card instead of Plasticard though. Or even a fine filler stained with black paint or ink!? Spacers of scrap strip between the planks while gluing and then fill and sand. Might work 😉 Some guys just go along the plank edges with a black felt pen.

Pretend deck planking by steve-d Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I don't want to build the deck up too much so have been looking at 0.5mm thick planks. Scale wise they need to be 5mm wide. And as Doug said 10:1 plank/gap so I'm planning to use 0.5mm black plasticard as the caulking. On a full size cabin cruiser what would be the normal length of a plank? I've been on Google to see if I can find any info but the best I found was an advert for planks that were 1220 long which seems rather short to my mind. Steve

Pretend deck planking by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Steve, What went wrong? 😲 1. Drawing on deck planking, i.e. on a veneer or thin ply- Why/how did it go wrong? Surely since the planks are all 'parallel curves' all you need to do is make a curve template in plasticard from the plan. Then at a few strategic points along the plank length mark the widths of the planks. Set the template along these points and 'Bob's yer Uncle - Fanny's yer Aunt' 😉 Mind you; doing it that way the 'curious grain of the planks' would betray the fiddle🤔 2. 'what type of strip wood - Any very close grained type. Possible source- http://www.slecuk.com/index.html 3. How to glue it!? Any thin, spreadable waterproof wood glue! 4. Gap? Max 0.5mm perhaps. Ca 10 to 1 ratio. 5. 'How do you secure the bent planks whilst the glue dries? Modelling pins at strategic points along the plank. Assumes planks are pre-shaped by steaming!! See 6. 😉 6. 'Do I need to steam the planks? - YES! As mentioned above; make a template defining the curve required. From this make a jig of ca 5mm x 10mm in which you can set the steamed planks to cool and set to the shape required. To allow for the so called 'spring back' make the jig with a slightly sharper curve than the actual deck curve. When fitting the planks to the deck it's easier to 'push them out' than to try to increase the curvature. Finally; mark on the deck base the plank widths at strategic points along the plank length as alignment points. Glue planks alternately left/right (OK port/starboard😉) using modelling pins to hold in place until the glue is fully cured. For the 'gaps' There are various solutions in Build Blogs on this site. One that I like is the use of thin black card. When the whole deck is planked and properly cured sand lightly (ca 240 grit). 7. 'weathered teak' there are various suppliers of teak stain and also deck weathering stains; e.g. Jotika stain, Lifecolor Washes for Hulls and Wooden Decks, set part no. LP04, which includes Wooden deck darkener and Shadower, amongst other useful weathering pigments. http://www.astromodel.it Google Lifecolor and you'll surely find some UK distributors. Enough answers for enough questions!? 😁 Hope this provides some inspiration, Cheers, Doug 😎

HMS Cadiz by landie Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 48" HMS Cadiz Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 120mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 25mm) Direct Drive Powered by LiPoly (14.8v) 7Amp/h Batteries - Comments: Scratch built other than a fibreglass hull, built by my father over about 5 years using a mix of balsa, plasticard, ply and wire. He never sailed it but when I inherited it I was determined to complete it ready for it's first "sea trials". I've completed the RC installation and adjusted the ballast and it's now had two successful outings at the local boating lake.

RMAS JOYCE A193 by Nutbourne Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
This is one of the limited edition Sirmar kits that was produce in the early 1990’s.this model was made by a friend of mine who’s a dockyard fitter and turner it was made about twenty eight years ago. Based on a tug that I worked on in and around Portsmouth harbour. This model has a working voith unit opening engine room skylights. Working lights, removable deck hatch to get at the unit like the real boat, the superstructure and gun whales are made from plasticard. The fender was made by a friend to the same type as used on the tug. The wheelhouse is copied like for like. The towing hook is copied from photos and slips like the real one. In all my years I haven’t seen another one like this . Sirmar made twenty numbered hulls as kits .

HMS M.33 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Yep! an there's 'undreds of 'em Steve 😉 Took me most of an afternoon to do an inventory check 😁 PS: and all the superstructure and deck parts are on printed plasticard sheets! Hoooray for scroll saws 😁

Painting by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Good luck Steve! I see your problem 🤔 Don't know how you want to do that with calipers😲 The radius is not constant so how do you progressively adjust the caliper / compass to match!? I would make a brass / alu template (min 2mm) to match the deck edge curve. Then you only have to mark the plank widths, at both ends, to be able to set the template for the next plank. The elegant 'T' piece on the bow I would first mark and scribe using a card or plasticard template taken from the plan. Bon chance mon ami! Cheers, Doug 😎

Rudders and Propellers by teejay Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

Vosper RTTL 2754 by Rex3644 Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 35"/3000g Vosper RTTL 2754 Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 25mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive to a 600 brushed (3 Blade) Powered by NiCad (7.2v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Chinese 320 amp ESC - Comments: Scratch built from plan (Vic Smeed) in the mid 60s by my brother in law I have been aware of this model from the mid 90s sitting on a top shelf in disrepair in his workshop in Wales. Being a reasonable frequent visitor l had looked at the hull of this model and at the end of march on a weekend visit I offered to take the hull and separate deck home with me. I obtained a set of plans off eBay an set about renovating the hull fitting the portholes and keeping as many original bits as possible.Some new deck vents and motor vents were 3d printed by my nephew. The Davits made from plasticard and plastic tubing sadly succumbed to damage during transit so again the 3d printer was put to use deck scuttles an cabin vents were also made Whilst making the super structures and mast I decided to make two of each with the veiw to making a sister vessel but this will be finished in white more on that to follow. 2754 was duly completed ready to return on our summer trip to see family again. We ran the boat on the Teifi estuary to complete a most enjoyable refurbishment and now my great nephew will have the joy of powered model boats having been brought up with yachts both large and small

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Mornin' Pete (it is in Germany anyway!) I agree, there are lots of details and 'standard equipment' missing from the basic model. You can see the winch and Life Raft canister in one of the photos of the original I posted above. Re Mast wiring; don't fiddle about putting a divider in the mast. It'll just get in the way. Attached is a pic of my modified mast. I used a 0.5mm brass wire on the right-hand side for the earth return. Wire is better than rod cos it's flexible (can be pushed into the corner). I glued it in with gel Gluper Sue WHEN all connections were soldered and tested. The LEDs are standard domed lens types. I ground the tops flat and painted the tops with several coats of matt black until it was opaque. After testing I closed off the mast with some plasticard and fitted ladder rungs made of copper wire. I also added the missing antenna cables to the bottom of the VHF IMM antennas, 0.5mm brass wire. (Some time I'll also fit the missing GPS antenna and anemometer.) Then painted the mast matt black. I then turned my attention to the searchlight and red/green NAV lights. First I stripped the wheelhouse roof and painted it white as in the original. On my model it was grey🤔 Then I drilled out the searchlight to accept a 5mm Bright White LED. You won't have to do this cos you have a later version with lights, mine had none 😭 Then had to paint the searchlight with several coats of matt black. Otherwise it just glowed all round! Pics show construction stages and finished lighting effect. All wires inside the wheelhouse roof I super glued to the ceiling and ran them down inside the funnels (stacks to you guys across the pond!😉) ready for connection to a switch board in the hull. While I was at it I rubbed the false Southampton name off the cabin using a 1000 grit Tamiya sponge and am preparing inkjet printed decals with the correct Wyeforce name and logo. Have fun getting all lit up Pete,😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Attached some pics showing the original 'Southampton' 😉 and making obvious what's missing on the model 🤔

Devils in the detail by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
after another week of work and in-laws visiting, ive managed to get a couple of days of detailing work done on the wheelhouse structure. The local model shop parted with several bits of plasticard, plastic rods and strips of various sizes after I parted with a few quid! after alot of photo studying, I have made a fair start on adding all the detail inside the wheel house. Its not a 100% acurate, but at this scale and once painted it should show a fair representation of the Waveney class wheelhouse. There is still quite a bit of detailing to go, before I remove the major components for detail painting. Ive started to build the seat for the Coxswain. There is also alot of roof detailing to go, but all in good time!

The Anchor. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi Molly. The planking is 7mm x 1.5mm Maple and the caulking is 0.7mm black plasticard. Have a look at the 'Planking' sections in this blog to see how it was done. Robbob.