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>> Home > Tags > plasticard

plasticard
plasticard
wheelhouse amd bridge by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
I don't have any photo's of the building of this, so I will try to explain. I cut all the pieces for the wheelhouse out of 1mm plasticard, the pieces were then fitted together with masking tape to make sure that they all fitted neatly together. The windows were then cut out of Perspex and their positions marked and put aside. The floor of the wheelhouse was planked along with the rear wall, the five side pieces were then wooded (for want of a better word) light oak for the frames with teak for the infills, the windows were checked to make sure they still fitted. The whole lot was fitted together with masking tape and glue run down the seams with a small brush. After drying the outside of the wheelhouse was wooded 😁 over lapping the windows by a couple of thou, the windows were glued in place with canopy glue. Aft of the wheelhouse are the battery boxes, these were made out of plasticard with doors made out of wood, kiss buttons used for the door knobs. Two sliding doors were made out of wood, small plastic channel for the runners. The bridge was made using the same principal as the boat deck.

Preparing the Hull Part 4 by NickG Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 11 days ago
Have managed to get some plasticard from a local model shop and have put a strengthening bar at the front of the hull where the floor was cut out that will also act as a locating tab for the control room.

S10 by Will-I-Am Seaman   Posted: 14 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 36"/1500g S10 Twin Propellors (3 Blade) Direct Drive to a Graupner jumbo 540 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (6v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Mtronik (10Amps) ESC - Comments: Built from a Vic Smeed plan in 1986, fibreglass hull, wood and plasticard and plasticard superstructure and various plastic, wood and metal fittings.

Rudders and propeller by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 27 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

Cabin windows again by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Having remade all the front cabin window frames I then decided to fit the acrylics into the opening (nice tight fit) all done! Or maybe not, someone then said how about “opening windows” it’s been done before. So would opening windows be a problem with water ingress? And would putting foam seals solve this problem? I’m not convinced. Having given the problem some days thought, how about going with the windows as planned which are now 1.5mm thick and inset into the surround. Then fitting an over window frame 1.0mm ply/plasticard with another thinner (1.0mm) acrylic window and hinging this above each window. This would solve the issue of water ingress and also give the appearance of opening front windows. Looking at how one other person approached this, it looks like the hinge was a brass tube across the majority of the window top and then a shorter piece the same dia tube at each end with an internal wire for rotation these short pieces are then fitted to the body of the inner window frame. These additional window frames can be added at a later stage and this doesn’t hinder the final finishing of the roof skins. So final fitting and adjustment and then pin and clamp in position the forward roof skins. When these are dry the window frames can be finally trimmed and then pinned into position and checked for fit then removed and then to each one apply the aliphatic glue and fit –pin and clamp in position

Building the Control Room Part 1 by NickG Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
Haven't had time to go to the model shop to buy some plasticard so I decided to keep the project moving by starting to build the control room. Firstly I carefully cut out the plastic base and plywood pieces before using some Deluxe Material Roket glue to glue everything together, however some sanding is going to be required once the glue has set to make all the edges smooth.

Detailing continues! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Have spent half a day adding more details to the decks. First thing was to remove and prime, paint and laquer the rear railings. Then spent some time making a job of fairing in the remoevable deck so that it blends better, still a way to go on that before I am satisfied. Other jobs included making some plasticard/tube bollards and the fore lifting eye, drill and temp fitting/modifying the side railings, fitting some faileads and making the front towing bollard thingy. Also fashioned from ply, plasticard and brass wire and front escape hatch, sanded, primed and painted orange, will fit when deck is finished. Having studied the Waveney book I have, it looks like I am going to have to butcher and modify the coxswains cabin quite extensivly as the kit version is based on the Coast Guard 44 footer, quie alot different to our RNLI boats? that will come back end of April as sadly I wong get alot done till then as away on a 2 week course from Sunday (Leaving the Army after 35 years service, having to resettle into CivDiv!)

Adding rear deck details by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Has been a few days since I have had a chance to get anything done due to day shifts over Easter. Anyway, a good day of progress today. Finished painting the Anchor and mounts on the rear cabin. The rest of the day has been concentrating on the rear deck. This includes 4 bollards, cleats and railings. All scratch built using a conbination of plasticard, plastic tube, brass tube, carbon rod and aluminium wire (included in the kit). The cleats are resin and where from eBay. The railings arnt glued into the deck yet, easier to paint off the deck and add at the end. I am modifying the centre deck as the model I am building had a deck plank with a metal grid on it. I had some wire mesh and laminated that to some ply, should be quite effective once painted and rubbed back to expose the metal wire.

Preparing the Hull Part 3 by NickG Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
I have glued the hull to the deck and smoothed all the outer edges to a smooth finish. Now it time to start work on getting the middle of the deck to fit back to the main deck so it's off to shop for some plasticard.

plasticard by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I am a returner to boat building after 45 years and have always used marine ply for the construction of all parts of my models. I am currently building the 46" crash tender ( I have a current Build Blog) and whilst browsing this site I see many people using plasticard for their construction, can anybody list the pro's and cons of this material eg 1 cost 2 ease of cutting plasti V ply eg circular saw, filing, knife cutting, bending/forming 3 gluing issues 4 paint preparation 5 gluing to other materials 6 overall which do people prefer

Boatdeck bulwark & boatdeck planking by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I haven't posted for a while as I have only been running on three cylinders, but all four firing now, so off we go. An edging is glued around the boatdeck, this then allows a thin piece of plasticard to be glued in place for the boatdeck bulwark, after the glue had dried, planks cut from a sheet of veneer were glued inside and out and the bulwark and finished with a teak capping. A cardboard template was made for the boatdeck overlay planking, this was then transferred onto 1mm ply for the planking to be laid on. Using planks cut from a sheet of veneer and cotton thread for the caulking, Aliphatic glue, a tooth pick and my best glasses the planking was completed. The finished planking was given several coats of clear lacquer rubbing down in between coats to give it a nice finish. Planking at this scale with fine thread as caulking is definitely a labour of love.

Roof Skins by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
nice job, I just cant work with wood, it hates me😁 so used plasticard, here is the hinged front windows on my pals 3 foot boat. I planned to do this, but the refurb was taking so long I decided to accelerate and get it finished, meaning I didn't do the opening windows. It will be a nice unique and accurate touch if you fancy doing it!

Let’s get some paint on! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Last couple of days things have moved on nicely! I have done some more work on the forward cockpit adding window frames from plasticard, still a long way to go on that part of the build. Cockpit is still loose from the hull, will be glued on once all the extra detailing has been completed. Have started to paint the exterior hull and add some decals. After several coats of grey and red primers with flating inbetween, have left the bottom of the hull oxide red. The blue is "Ford Royal Blue" which is a recommended match for RNLI boats. Some waveneys appear in a light blue, but I am basing mine on 44-003 which was the darker blue. Red and white trimlines added, bumper strips painted black, lettering was from eBay (search custom vinyl lettering). Finally a light coat of laquer to protect. several coats of laquer will be added at the end.

Doors by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Colin, I think the wood for the doors is about 2mm thick, a thin strip slightly wider than 2mm of plasticard is super glued around the edge, then using wet and dry sanded flush front and back. After drilling the hole for the porthole, the whole lot was given a couple of coats of Halfords clear lacquer and the knob stuck on. 👍

Doors by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Here is a photo of the doors for the main superstructure, made out of a thin piece of Oak with a surround made from plasticard, brass portholes and dolls house knobs. The watertight doors made from plasticard and the hinges also made from plasticrd with the aid of a magnifying glass 😁 I bought the two sets of portholes from MMModels as it wasn't worth the trouble of making them all, lazy I know 😜