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>> Home > Tags > plywood

plywood
plywood
Cabin Repair by canabus Commander   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi All Started on fixing the bits I broke in removing the old paint. The forward window had a gap in the middle to the deck, so I added timber behind the bottom of the window and filled in the gap. Masking tape to the deck and combing, a lump of filler, sit the cabin down and wait for the filler to dry. Remove cabin, masking tape, trim and sand down. As the aft of the cabin sits over the deck a fair bit, I added a plywood piece back to the combing so to strengthen the aft cabin area and replaced the bottom section under one of the windows. Remodelling this boat and building the SG&K 1920 Gentleman's Runabout is keeping me busy!!! This retirement is great, but, I still liked my old job. Canabus

44 life boat by GARTH Lieutenant   Posted: 27 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 34"/900g 44 life boat Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 60mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 30mm) Geared Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through pro boat (5Amps) ESC - Comments: I built the 44 several years ago & wasn't happy with her as it listed to much on port & starboard turns because the cabin was to heavy so I rebuilt the cabin with lighter plywood started running her at the pond & seems a lot better now.Still needs a little more work with fittings

Sophia by Alan999 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
The Sophia is a Chris Craft Riva that I am building from scratch using scrap plywood.

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

Glue by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Steve My entire model has been constructed using the following three glues: Poundlands version of no more nails Poundlands superglue 8 pack West system epoxy All have stuck plasticised to plywood in some fashion. Two are £1 each and the west system cost me £20 for a patch repair kit. Hope this helps Graham

Glue by cormorant Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
I want to cover the plywood deck with 0.5mm plasticard. What type of adhesive should I use please? Steve

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

Just Keep Swimming by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
The maritime museum's event, scheduled for October instead of May, was cancelled as a hurricane blew up the coast and pushed water up the bay flooding a lot of coastal bay towns like St Michaels. I couldn't make the next Port Expo in 2016, but I tried to be ready for the maritime museum in October. I started making the forward bulwarks. The real ship had sections that folded down on bronze hinges a few of which still exist as she still had her forward bulwarks when she came to Baltimore. They could also be removed. I mad all the section as a single piece and I don't intend to make them functional, just something to snag and need to be repaired. As mentioned, the original winch drums warped and I made new ones with styrene drums instead of wood. These vanished around the time I moved and haven't been found yet, so I got some sheet plastic to take the place of the CDs and made a new pair. I have to say, I'm not happy with these at all. I did add a small block of Delrin to each winch to brace the drums against the pull of the braces/springs. Constellation's board at her entry port were carved. I took a photo of an original at the ship and traced it in PaintShopPro. Scaled it to the model and printed it. I glued this to some bass wood. I have some mahogany I can slice some thing slabs off of, and I may try using a rotary tool to carve a set for real, but till then, these will do. I tried to make the tops'l yard parrels which are iron hoops lined with wood. There's a pin for the yard's yoke to ride on, and the hoop can be opened and hinged to be removed. I wanted all that in case I need to remove a yard at some point without pulling down the whole rig. I tried it with some sheet brass, and again, I wasn't too hgappy with the result. We'll come back to that. So, I fiddled around with cutting combs to make hatch gratings, and actually managed to get something done, which led to making the main hatch cover. I had cut a bit of plywood as a cover, just to keep dust from going below while I was working - I based my hatch cover on this piece, framed the bottom; installed ledged for it to sit on inside the hatch coaming, and made gratings and fake beams on top. It's a bit simplified buy what the ship actually had, but it gets the point across. A couple of smaller gratings also got installed giving the deck a more finished appearance. I wasn't thrilled at bumping the bottom of a pool again, but the maritime museum is on the Miles River. I needed to be able to launch and retrieve the model at a boat-ramp or shore, so I started designing a launch-cart....

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

The Spar Deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Once I was satisfied I had all the fairleads I needed, or might need (I put in some extras, just-in-case), It was time to permanently close up the deck. The luan plywood sub-deck had long ago been cut into 2" strips to allow it to take the deck camber and sheer. I had also painted on it's underside except where the deck framing was, so the paint wouldn't interfere with the epoxy. I got a few very nice days in October (2014) great for dealing with epoxy, and to take on this major step in the model's construction. There's a sinking feeling about this, like you've just locked your keys in the car. First I removed the mechanical decks below, cleaned out the hull, replaced a deck beam whose joint had never set right, and dabbed epoxy onto things I'd never be able to reach again. The mechanical decks were painted white. The turning blocks for the steering were epoxied in place; having been hot-glued in all these years. Now I painted epoxy on the entire underside of each strip to seal it as well as glue it to the deck beams. Working from out-board toward the center-line. I clamped the strips down, but also used copper tacks to hold it down that would be left in. In short order, the sub-deck was epoxied and nailed in place. Now the only access inside was through the hatches. All the cracks and seams on the deck were filled with polyester putty (Bondo), especially around the deck/hull joint. When this set, I sanded it, filled missed places, and sanded some more. Then a layer of 4oz cloth, left over from glassing her hull 5 years before, was laid on the sub-deck. At this point the deck was an integral part of the hull. I ordered 3/16" x 48" square bass strips to plank the spar deck. I was going to cut this from a maple board I hand, but could get what I wanted safely from the saw. I was concerned bass (lime) wouldn't be hard enough, but it's been great. As holidays and cold weather reduced the time I could spend in the shop, I made up the rest of her spars and their hardware; as well as framing up and installing the fore and aft access hatches. I also cut the deck strips to their length. Then winter came and stayed until April. Meanwhile I hemmed the rest of her sails.

Triton by Krampus Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
With my boats getting routinely stranded in the middle of nowhere, I felt compelled to commission a rescue vessel and "Triton" was born. "Triton" is a Springer-type tug push boat. With a hull and superstructure consisting of an “Indiana” style command cabin, it was built using a pretty basic birch plywood American kit designed for swimming pool water polo. Kit altered to resemble a fictitious Salvamento Marítimo (Spanish Coast Guard) unit following Salvamento Marítimo’s actual boat markings. Equipment and deck layout inspired on actual Springer tug push boats supporting larger vessels and barges found in US and European ports and rivers. Model built during September – October 2015. Approx. 1/18 scale. Real life boat could be a 30-footer (9.14m) vessel. Equipped with 9v LED navigation lights and sound system. Powered by an HPI Racing 1145 Gt 550 Motor, NiMH 7.4v battery, a 3-bladed 44mm propeller, and a 6-12V 320A RC Ship & Boat R/C Hobby Brushed Motor Speed Controller.

Masts, mast steps, inside the hull, the rudder by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
The model's lower masts are made of white cedar. These were cut square, a taper hand-planed in, made 8-sided, then round. The bands are the same brown paper tape the hull was covered in. A visit to the real ship in Baltimore to get measurements, and look at some artifacts netted me some bits of live oak original to the ship. The Navy began stockpiling live oak for ship-building in 1816 with the Gradual Increase Act. It was from these stockpiles that Constellation was built. These trees were as much as 200 years old when cut, so this wood I have could be as much as 400 years old. I wasn't sure how to incorporate this bit of the ship into the model, and opted to make the mast steps from it. One piece is the size of a business card and stamped USS Constellation 1854. I'll stamp the year she's finally finished and my name into that and install it as her builder's plate. The masts step on what I call her mechanical decks. These are simple 3/8" plywood panels where her mechanics and controls will be mounted. Beams were epoxied into the hull for them, and they are held in place with brass wood screws. The aft deck is where the mizzen steps and the rudder servo is mounted. The battery lies on it's own deck just abaft the main mast as low as it can possibly be inside the hull. The cross-section drawing shows deck beams, decks, ballast rods, the external ballast, etc etc etc. The rudder is made from Plexiglas as shown in it's drawing. A brass tube passes through the stern that the rudder's head just fits into. There's no room behind the rudder head for a bell-crank setup to work, so I again went with real boat tech and installed a tiller, made of copper plate soldiered to a set-collar. There's a couple of pictures of the aluminum tubes for the ballast rods in there. You may want to right-click on an image, like the drawings, and "View Image" then click on it to see it full size and legible. Use the browser's "back" button to get out of that.

Constellation by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
This model was started in February of 1999, and has been worked on, at best, in fits and starts. While progress has been made, and it's capable of sailing, it's far from finished. It began as plywood paneling pulled from the walls of my first house and cut into frames. It was to be planked with white pine strips, also scraps from remodeling, but I was distracted by a book. Nasty things books, put all sorts of ideas in your head. I got the idea of making a plug for a mold so I could turn out THREE hulls! One for me, one for sale, and one to be donated to the real ship. To that end, and with the inspiration of the book, instead of planking, I battened the hull and sheathed it with brown paper wet-n-stick packing tape. Let's just say, that wasn't a good idea and leave it at that. A lot of life changes happened; moved to a farm; got unmarried, sold the farm, got an apartment, got a house with a workshop, and 10 years later, recommenced work on the model. I continued on with the original plan for about a day when I shifted gears and decided to glass the "plug" and make it a hull. I proceeded to prep it to that end, but looking back, what I should have done was strip it down the the forms and start again, planking it properly. Instead, I covered the outside with 4oz cloth, filled between the battens with poly resin and glass matting. The images show the model from it's start to it's glassing, though the site won't allow me to dictate the order in which they're presented - sorry for that. The model is of the American sloop of war Constellation launched in 1855, and as she appeared in Naples in 1856 based on a painting of her by Thomas deSimone. She is 1:36 scale; 1 inch = 3 feet. Beam: 13-5/8" (34.6 cm) Length on deck: 61" (154.9 cm) Length between perpendiculars (American): 59-1/8" (150.2 cm) Draft, without ballast keel: 7" (17.8 cm) With 3-1/2" ballast keel: 10-1/2" (26.7 cm) Weight, with ballast: Approx. 100 pounds (45.36 kg) Length over the rig: 95" (241.3 cm) Width over the rig: 30.5" (77.5 cm) ~ Main yard w/o stuns'l booms. Height bottom of keel to main truck, without ballast keel: 65" (165.1 cm) With ballast keel: 69" (175.3 cm) Total Sail Area: 2,807.01 square inches in 17 sails (19.5 sf, 18,110 scm, 1.8 sqm) Working Sail Area: 1,836.1square inches in 13 sails (12.75 sf, 11,845 scm, 1.2 sqm)

3D printing by Delboy Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
That's a fair comment but you could say the same about buying a pre-moulded hull or a kit. But, take it to its logical conclusion, do you fabricate your own plywood? Cultivate, and harvest your own balsa wood/bass wood/mahogany? Be a purist if that's what you want but is it right to sneer at others who find their own path to tread?

Steaming ply- good idea or not? by Peter47 Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
So glad they worked for you, have been back to PB site and added link to all folders on OneDrive as well as google+, just to cover all the bases. Thanks for the idea 😁. Most of her cargo LCAs and LCMs and launch ramps, I did in mainly plastic card, bar the Keel of the LCAs were constructed in balsa, for ease. One or two of the LCAs had plywood sides & deck, but which even I couldn't say 😋