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>> Home > Tags > plywood

plywood
plywood
Sea Commander restoration tips by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Get yourself a small pack of epoxy resin from ebay and seek out all slight delaminations of the plywood frames. Get the epoxy in those split bits and clamp them up. A clothes peg is sufficient if you're short of space. You can put a piece of cling film twixt peg and wood so the peg doesn't stick. Then use the rest of the epoxy to waterproof the insides. Be thorough and methodical. If you sand the model back to wood, use epoxy on that, either through fine model aircraft fibreglass cloth or just squeegee epoxy on all over with an old credit card. It goes much further and gets forced into the grain. It's not necessary to use GRP cloth on everything if it's well built. I have several over-50 year old model boats that are perfectly water tight with decent paint jobs (enamel, of course). Cheers, Martin

RAF Fireboat (vintage) Aero by CB90 Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 9/10] 34"/2500g RAF Fireboat (vintage) Aero Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 40mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 45mm) Direct Drive to a Bullet 30 (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through 24v 15A Electronize (15Amps) ESC - Comments: Ebay job £50 Old Vintage Aero kit 34in Fire boat needing a lot of attention, with delaminating plywood, old glue, old glow-plug engine mounts with electric conversion, and after removing a metal shield I discover an vintage (1970,s Ripmax Bullet 30 Motor the dogs bollocks of electric racing of its time capable of running 24v at 15A. 300W for a brushed motor. Started by revamp rear pit by lowering servo and rudder and building sub deck, storage lockers, tow hook and ladders. Remount the motor with an aluminium mount with custom screw positions. Block windows with 1mm ply. Foam front half of hull to make unsinkable. Make centre decking area. Repair and build up on cabin roofs and walls to centre deck. Rewire add ESC and servo. Remove broken and unusable fittings such as large vents, some missing unable to match again. Problems with old gloss paint crazing the modern spay paints. Build some fittings eg Water cannons, life belts, Build new battery trays, Painting the boat now in progress as of 20/04/2018 Boat has be roughly painted but is not finished, as fittings are now required, added a RC system an gave it a test run. the performance was adequate on 14.4v and great on 17.2v see latter pictures on the pond. the motor did get hot after about half hour of use. the motor is rated at 24v but I think a smaller prop will be required for that voltage. Excellent performance from a brushed motor. Added some stickers and I have now added a 12v fan and ventilation between cabins as the motor required some cooling and was in a sealed compartment.

Building the Control Room Part 1 by NickG Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
Haven't had time to go to the model shop to buy some plasticard so I decided to keep the project moving by starting to build the control room. Firstly I carefully cut out the plastic base and plywood pieces before using some Deluxe Material Roket glue to glue everything together, however some sanding is going to be required once the glue has set to make all the edges smooth.

Higgins PT Boat by boaty Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Good to see a model of the Higgins PT Boat and a scratch built one at that. I had a Revell 1.72nd one back in 1961 when I was 9 but these became eclipsed the following year when the PT 109 film was released. Love the background music and your sailing water in Albert Park. The boat looks so realistic and you've now got me thinking of building one. Never yet seen a model of a Huckins P.T boat. Is there anyone out there who has built one? Long live the plywood dream. BOATY😁

MTB741 Fairmile D by reilly4 Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 58"/9000g MTB741 Fairmile D Capable of 9mph and a runtime of 65mins Twin Propellors (2 Blade S Type 40mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner 700BB 12V (2 Blade S Type) Powered by NiMH (12v) 9Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through MTroniks 30A Tio x 2 (10Amps) ESC - Comments: 1/24 Scale. Scratchbuilt from John Lambert Drgs & photos. It took 3.5 years. Plywood bulkheads, pine stringers & balsawood planking, then fibreglassed. Superstructure balsawood. Guns scratchbuilt from tinplate and brass. There are 2 motors and drive trains powered by 2 x 9cell NiMH D cells x 9Ah. 6 pdr guns rotate. 20mm oerlikon rotates and elevates. Radio is Futaba 2.4 GHz

Bulwark capping by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
So, here we go again. Bulwark capping, I didn't have a piece of teak wide enough to cut these out off, so two strips of teak were cut to the relevant size on the band saw and sanded. A large piece of plywood was laid on the top of the hull, the hull outline was drawn onto the plywood, blocks of wood were secured to the plywood to hold the strips of teak in place but exaggerating the curve. [To allow for spring back] The teak was soaked overnight, the next day it was soaked in boiling water a few times, whilst still hot and wet it was placed in the blocks to dry. I had to alter the blocks once to gain a bit more curve. After the strips were properly dried, the top and sides of the strips were given two coats of finishing resin and left to dry, then the underside was coated with super glue and left the dry. Then the tricky bit, wearing my best glasses I applied with the aid of a tooth pick super glue to the tops and bulwark supports and fitted the capping's. The piece around the stern was cut out of one piece and looks alright.

Sail Winch Servo Identification by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
In a Marblehead Sailboat the sail servo has a sticker on the side. It reads: D.H.Andrews 48 Aberdale Road Leicester, LE2 6GE England The Servo is glued in the plywood base so the phone number cannot be read. The Servo indentification number is missing. Can anyone assist with identifying this Servo, and who D.H.Andrews is? This Marblehead Sailboat built and purchased in Toronto,Ontario, Canada.

spares please by BigChris Seaman   Posted: 3 months ago
I recently acquired a Mantua Bruma part kit off e-bay. The three sheets containing the laser cut hull frames are missing. Can you buy these sheets from anywhere or does anyone by any chance have these sheets lying around. I have a full set of plans. The alternative would be to cut out new frames using the plan as a template. What technique/tools would it be most adviseable to use to cut the plywood

1st Gunwhale stringers by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
This boat looks like it will be very heavy using those plywood bulkheads.

Dumas 1203 Coast Guard Lifeboat (RNLI Waveney conversion) by Bobatsea Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Agreed. The plywood is poorly stamped and requires much sanding. The Canadian 44 had an enclosed cabin, so for me I've scratched build the cabin and didn't use any of the supplied wood for it.

Riva boat launch by Alan999 Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Riva was finally launched in the Torrevieja boat clubs water last Sunday after eleven months work. Fifteen coats of yacht varnish and final Polish of Turtle wax she went like a dream.Plans came from America and the plywood from local woodyard.Graupner 37 motor pushed 31 inches smoothly. Dumas supplied the chrome fittings

Clyde puffer by Alan999 Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi Marky Plans came yesterday. I think it's what I want and will copy and put on plywood. Many thanks Alan

Marblehead Sailboat upgraded by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
My friend bought this sailboat build in 1996 along with 15 other boats at Port Credit, Ontario. My friend Ewald Bengel and his brother Fred, bought the sailboat with R/C equipped, but older Futaba AM but usable. The boat needed structural reinforcements, several new bulkheads, R/R rudder block and repair the rudder. They are not racing the boat intending to keep it at their summer home on the lake. They had me add a Birch plywood deck and hatchway. Progress is being made.

Riva Chris Craft by Alan999 Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
Finally the Riva completed. Numerous varnishing and rubbing down Dumas sent from America chrome fittings which gives really good finishing touch Built from plans and scrap plywood and veneer. So much more pleasure making than from kit. Will launch at Torrevieja boat club second Sunday of the month .

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D printer. That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail stanchions are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire stanchions are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!