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>> Home > Tags > plywood

plywood
plywood
Fitting the side skins. by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 22 days ago
Robbob, Looking back again on some of your earlier posts, I see the plywood skinning that you did. I will be doing this on a future build as I am not the best at planking a hull. Your reference to HEATING THE PLYWOOD is a great tip, I have never tried that. Thanks, Joe

Crack in seam Repaired! by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 22 days ago
Ed, I have the plastic hull. I used a strip of fiberglass per instructions and never have had a leak issue. At the time I did this, about 4 years ago, I was doing a lot of fiberglass work so I had the proper supplies. Adheres to plastic hull well. My current build is a Springer Tug Rescue Vessel, I am hoping to get the plywood hull sealed only with paint. We will see... Joe

Deck, servo mount by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 26 days ago
Put together a pilot house based on some tugs I've seen. Just freelanced it as I went. I build a lot with styrene so I am used to just cutting and building. I use liquid styrene cement that fuses the materials together. See photo, will trim it out as I mount it, need to add some detail at roof and some Navigational lighting. Put on on 3mm plywood deck, same as hull bottom. The deck is also curved (proper term is SHEAR) and I started to build up some wood edge at the opening. Will sand everything well, then start sealing and priming all surfaces. Made a bracket for the rudder servo mount and an adjacent platform for the ESC and RX. Ordered two 6v 5ah SLA batteries. I will wire in parallel to stay with 6v and get 10ah. I like to stay with 6 volts as I want the motor to run slow like a tug should. Will wire in an in-line fuse. Haven't decided where I will put switch, up high somewhere to avoid water. I will show the wiring once I get to it. This build is going fast because it's a simple design, just what I was looking for. I work on it late afternoons and into the evening while I watch basketball games. About 4 hrs a day. Looking forward to building the hatch and getting some primer started tomorrow. Regards, Joe 👍

Moving along by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 28 days ago
Merry Christmas to All! Yesterday I made a brass strap to secure the motor, then aligned the drive shaft and stuffing tube. Tacked tube in place with a gel superglue, will be covered with epoxy later. Used a short piece of aluminum tube to help align the motor and shaft. A coupler will be placed here. Cut some plywood pieces to create keel at the shaft tube. White stuff is marine epoxy by locktite, just enough to set everything. I will then coat and finish this assembly. Finished the day's work by constructing a rudder, no photo yet. Enjoy Christmas! Joe

Day Three by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 30 days ago
Hi, Using 3mm Baltic birch plywood, I skinned the hull. Used Titebond III wood glue, bent by hand, drilled and tacked in place with small brads. I cut the bottom oversized so it was easier to position, after drying 16 hours I cut the edges flush with the sides using a Japanese pull saw. Built the core for my rudder, see photos, solder my own arm as I did not have one. Used a 3/16" set collar, filed the surface to expose brass and solder a piece brass. Will drill the second hole later. Attached brass plate that will be inside the actual rudder, will build from either plastic or wood. Next, laid out the placement of the stuffing tube, then drilled the hull then I built a motor mount from wood and added some green foam to limit mount vibration and sound transfer. Set the rudder post and block. Time to let everything overnight. Joe

Day Two Springer by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 30 days ago
Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. If you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe

Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
Void

Pretend deck planking by Zdenek Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
The bend was done using a "jig" and two strips of a thin plywood as a protection of the planks (nor to distort them by clamps as it happened for the first time). First, I cooked them a little, of course. When dried, they kept the shape nicely. For caulking, the epoxy (or aliphatic wood glue) could be "injected" into the gaps left between the planks. I have tried all three methods (black paper, epoxy and aliphatic glue) and went for paper, at the end.

Pretend deck planking by steve-d Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
I found the pencil did not give enough definition to the plank join. A fine fibre tip pen produced a good line but the ink still tried to chase the grain of the wood. I managed to smudge a couple of lines before they had dried. But finally, the grain of the plywood looked 'wrong' on the planks which would not be too bad down the side of the cabin but the foredeck planks will have a quite significant curve and a large surface area to see how 'wrong' the grain is. I have a wallpaper steamer somewhere in the garage so modifying that will be the next job. Steve

steam water pump by GaryLCoupland Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
You don't need to buy a water tank, simply build one into your hull using plywood and fibre-glass, the favourite is the sharp end simply fit a wooden bulk-head and cover it in fibre-glass.

Vintage style yacht designed by "Vic Smeed" by lhpen Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Any one interested in buying my Yacht ? ''Starlet'' Vintage style yacht designed by "Vic Smeed" all plywood construction, 11" beam x34" length, sail area 465 Sq inches. Complete with heavy duty sail arm large servo and rudder servo installed. Good sails although slightly marked and rigging. Install a receiver ready to sail. PRICE REDUCED NOW £105 Best if collected in person. Located in West Surrey. 01252 727028

36" Thames River Police Launch by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
After the successful build of the ‘Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.

Pretend deck planking by sidley70 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello from Australia, First start off with a scrap piece of plywood the same as you intend to use for the deck. Work out the width of the planks and score lightly with a scriber (not to deep). Using a ruler or suitable guide ,mark the lines with a no 3 fine tipped marker pen. wait till dry(usually 24hours to stop bleeding) then either spray or paint on satin laquer. (3coats). Always works for me. Good luck. Sid

Cast keel bulb by steve-d Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
No mounting points yet. I thought I was pushing my luck trying to DIY mould 6.5Kg of lead without making things worse with fixings. Plan is that the fin will be between 12 and 30mm thick with a 10mm plywood core which I will set into the lead. Then an 8mm diameter carbon rod right up into the hull finishing above the waterline and two M6 stainless steel studs to hold the keel on. One of those studs will pass right through the lead. There will not be space for the second stud to do the same.

Deans Robert E. Perry Libertyship by Sanddancer Apprentice   Posted: 4 months ago
I am presently very slowly building the Deans City of Ely which is very similar to the Robert E Perry. I have got the motor and the prop installed and I have cut the decking and picked up some good points from your pictures, ( i hope you don't mind😡), I particularly like the plywood under deck and noted that you built up the stern where the rudder post is fitted. I think I shall follow your lead there.👍