|||
Current Website Support
57
Contributors
19
Subscribers
You are Not Registered
Subscribe for your gold medal πŸ…
Ads
Ad Free
Until Cancelled
Β£1
Β£2
Β£3
Β£5
Donate for your silver medal πŸ…
Ads
Ad Free
12 Months
Β£10
Β£15
Β£25
Β£50
You Will Be Helping Towards:

  • Domain Fees
  • Security Certificates
  • iOS & Android App Fees
  • Website Hosting
  • Fast Servers
  • Data Backups
  • Upkeep & Maintenance
  • Administration Costs

    Without your support the website wouldn't be what it is today.

    Please consider donating towards these fees to help keep us afloat.

    Read more

    All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

    Many thanks for your kind support
  • Join Us On Social Media!
    Download The App!
    Model Boats Website
    Model Boats Website
    Home
    Forum
    Build Blogs
    Media Gallery
    Boat Clubs & Lakes
    Events
    Boat Harbour
    How-To Articles
    Plans & Docs
    Useful Links
    Registered
    30th Aug 2020
    Last Online
    28th Nov 2021
    Black Shoe
    Member Stats
    Stats
    Member No.#5969
    RegisteredπŸ“…30th Aug 2020
    Last OnlineπŸ“…28th Nov 2021
    CityπŸ“Portland Maine
    CountryπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈUnited States
    Gender♂️Male
    AgeπŸ‘Ά78
    PostsπŸ’¬90
    FollowersπŸ“£4
    Likes ReceivedπŸ‘351

    πŸ’¬ Send Private Message
    Members Following
    Follow Black Shoe
    πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ EdH ( Midshipman)
    πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺ RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
    πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Scratchbuilder ( Captain)
    πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦ Ron ( Commodore)
    4 Followers
    Recent Activity
    Liked Time to call it complete 3 days ago
    Liked Re: Tedium at it's best..... 30 days ago
    Liked Re: Tedium at it's best..... 30 days ago
    Warrant Officer
    Ranks Points
    Fleet Admiral 10,000
    Admiral 8,000
    Vice Admiral 6,000
    Rear Admiral 5,000
    Commodore 4,000
    Captain 3,000
    Commander 2,500
    Lieutenant Commander 2,000
    Lieutenant 1,600
    Sub-Lieutenant 1,200
    Midshipman 900
    Warrant Officer 600
    Chief Petty Officer 1st Class 450
    Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class 300
    Petty Officer 1st Class 200
    Petty Officer 2nd Class 150
    Master Seaman 100
    Leading Seaman 50
    Able Seaman 20
    Recruit 0
    295 Points Away From Midshipman!
    Points
    ActivityWorthAwarded
    πŸ‘ Likes (rcv'd)1351
    πŸ’¬ Forum250
    ✍️ Comments282
    ✏️ Blog480
    πŸ“· Photos40
    πŸŽ₯ Videos100
    πŸ“ Place80
    🚀 Harbour832
    πŸ“ Guestbook100
    😊 Avatar1010
    605 Total Points
    Contributor
    United States
    Signature
    "Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment." Will Rogers.
    About
    Just an old retired duffer who's primary job is to let the dog out, let the dog in, let the dog out, repeat.......
    Members Harbour
    U.S. Coast Guard 40' UTB 40535
    This is a 1:12 scale 40 footer that was part of the US Coast Guard's main harbor and inshore search and rescue (SAR) fleet. I served as engineer on a couple of these in the early '60's. They had a pair of GM 6-71's and the water expansion tanks actually had "GM" cast into them. At some point it was deemed PC to change that to "Detroit". The figures are modified action figures. Some plastic surgery, Squadron Putty, and a couple of old school "Dixie Cup" hats made them into sailors. This boat represents the MK IV version, but the boat's number won't show up in any archive as for some reason the 40535 number was skipped. I thought I'd fill the gap.
    The River Supply Company (RSC) Docks
    This isn't actually a boat, but it floats and boats use them, so with your permission I submit the River Supply Company headquarters. This isn't a diorama in the strictest sense, but allows a little imagination and some story telling. The "barn doors" open and close, the dock lights and "office" lights are on two separate circuits, The fish cleaning station is actually plumbed for water, there is the obligatory shop radio, and there is an anchoring system all remotely controlled. It is rather a nuisance to launch and retrieve, but if the weather permits during the summer it may stay in the pond for two or three days at a time. There is another dock that augments this one creating a total of 16 linear feet (32' using both sides,) at 1:18 scale for "fleet" dockage.
    "Nonesuch" and barge "Asset #1"
    "Nonesuch" is a 1:18 scale typical inland river pushboat found on most waterways in the US. She pushes a scale 75' barge equipped with a boom for hauling snags (fallen trees and other hazards to navigation,) and gear aboard for servicing the larger line boats. Two wheels, steering and flanking rudders, lights, sound, and the normal clutter found on these vessels. The towboat can be operated independent of the barge.
    Galley News
    This boat represents a small inter-island coastal freighter that would carry almost anything from the mainland to the islands of any coast. I don't know what the actual speed is, but it is just slightly faster than scale. It has a 6V battery that I have never run down on an outing. Galley is hard chined, very responsive, and (I think) presents well on the water.
    Recent Posts
    πŸ’¬ Re: Time to call it complete
    3 days ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Looks great Bill! I agree with Tora Dog - looking forward to seeing "Asterias" in person!

    What's next?
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 28 Views
    πŸ’¬ Re: Tedium at it's best.....
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thank you all!

    Doug, you're way beyond my simple system! Your bench looks like the lab at a rocket control manufacturer.πŸ˜‰

    Tug Hercules....phew! I couldn't remember who I got Ms Maude from, so scanned the pages myself. Turns out "Printle Shop" printed her. There's two (maybe more) versions. If you go to SW and search "1:18 scale female figures" you'll get a lot of totally unrelated stuff too, (they have the worst search system going I think,) but go to pg 43 and Maude has a lunch basket under her arm, and pg 45 has the Maude on "Fort Valley".
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 18 Views
    3
    πŸ“ Tedium at it's best.....
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    A little preamble here.......when seeing a boat at night with the deck lights on it's seldom a stark white light illuminating a vast area unless it's a light on a work boat and even then the work deck seems to be surrounded by an aura making the area out of the light even darker. Seeing the deck lights on a ship or boat a little distance off appears to be a lighted area, then a darker space in between the lights, then brighter, then darker, then brighter and so forth as one scans down the deck. I don't recall seeing a deck evenly lit all along it's length. Another aspect of deck lights (to me anyway,) is they're seldom white. Most of what I recall were an off-white leaning towards a pale yellow. This may have been atmosphere, the globes the lights were in, or perhaps my fuzzy focus, but my mind's-eye sees them as off-white a little, and not terribly bright.

    I suppose all of the fore-going was to excuse or explain my rational for how I'm approaching the deck lights on "Fort Valley". These lights are for the observer ashore so they didn't have to be so bright as to actually light up an area. I also didn't want a lot of power being used for the system with the attendant heat of an incandescent bulb so elected to go with LED chips. Using these posed another issue as they have a strong focal point and I wanted the lights to be more diffused. The answer here seems to be using a piece of 5mm acrylic rod lightly sanded to make the "globe" opaque. A chip light glued to the top provides a glow that from a short distance provides a suitable amount of light that isn't over powering. I'll run these off 6V and a Pico switch through the receiver.

    Building one or two of these isn't much of an issue, but build 18-20 and having them come out looking somewhat like the previous one is the tedium part.
    I've built six to date, (the first five being fails,) but think I have a system now that may work and keep them relatively the same.

    I hear someone saying "you could have ordered some printed cages and painted them...." Yes, I could, but that would have been against my masochistic nature. πŸ˜‰

    The following photos are the progression of building one unit. The only thing not included is the base. Another attribute of the nano chip is the small hole required in the deckhouse to pass the chip through. once the chip is passed through it is glued to the top of the acrylic rod with fabric glue. This glue is flexible, waterproof, and if the need arises can be cut with a razor blade unlike CA. It takes a little longer to cure, but worth the extra time IMHO.

    The procedure: pre-determined lengths of "cage wire". Wire bent to shape, then installed in jig. Top ring installed, then spacer slid into place to allow the lower ring to be consistent. CA is sufficient for these pieces as they're tucked up under the upper deck and are frail enough that soldering isn't necessary.
    Once I get them all built and installed I'll follow up here.....
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 21 Views
    7
    8
    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    Thanks for the comments!

    Tug, the figures on the 01 deck came from American Diorama found on Ebay. They have two sizes and are designed primarily for the 1:18 and 1:24th model car enthusiasts, but a little "plastic surgery" makes them useful aboard ships and boats. The skipper on "Galley News" is from them too. (Images below.)
    Ms Maude (the cook) is from Shapeways. I needed someone with attitude for her position.πŸ˜€

    The stanchions came from Harbor Models in CA. however they had to be modified. They were 55mm from the top ball to the bottom of the threaded portion of the mount, but weren't quite tall enough (from the bottom flange) to be ergonomically correct for the scale (1:18 height) of the figures. I needed to modify them so they'd be correct to an average person's height. The fix was some small brass tubing cut to length, the stanchion was cut in two below the lower ball, then the bottom half inserted into one end of the tubing, the top half inserted into the other end, and a touch of solder to hold it all together. This operation netted stanchions of 52mm above the mounting flange which is within the allowed "specs" for a shipboard hand rail. The images below show the difference in stock and modified units. Few observers notice the larger diameter below the lower ball .....small difference in overall height, but necessary IMHO.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 26 Views
    1
    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    There's more to be done with Fort Valley, but with our winter season nearly upon us I've had to concentrate on household projects so I don't suffer any guilt this winter at the bench.
    There's lighting, interior furniture, and several additional details to be done all the while contemplating the next project and what would compliment this build.
    Having thought it over and Fort Valley being primarily a harbor tug, it seems appropriate that she have a "stick lighter" to shuttle around a busy waterfront. Googling "Stick Lighter" will net a host of pictures of long BBQ lighters, fire starters, and appliances to remove the stigma of using everyday common matches to start a fire.
    In the maritime context a "stick lighter" is merely a barge (lighter) to offload ships in the stream which is virtually self sufficient sans propulsion power (although this was also common.) The "stick" was a colloquial term for the mast, boom, and associate equipment. These were sometimes steam powered, carried a small three man crew, and in an RC model will allow a modest amount of animation. A lot of possibilities for a tug/lighter combination....

    In the mean time, here's a few photo's of Fort Valley's latest outing.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 30 Views
    8
    4
    πŸ“ model finishing.
    2 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    I'm not sure of the brand you're using Jim, but in my limited experience I've not soaked the sand paper. What I have done is use a small bucket or sauce pan full of water and just a drop or two of dishwashing soap mixed in. I also have a small bottle of water that I can mist the surface that I'm sanding. As the "sanding mud" builds I wipe it off with a paper towel, and rinse the sand paper in the bucket to prevent a build-up of "mud" in the paper's grit. Keeping it rinsed and the work wiped off but damp seems to work pretty well. One caution: very little pressure is required when going for a smooth finish as the paper usually cuts pretty fast when clean.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 31 Views
    5
    πŸ’¬ Re: Fletcher
    3 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    I'm betting Mrs Tora Dog was thrilled with that smoke in her house!πŸ˜€
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 71 Views
    πŸ“ Tug Fort Valley
    3 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    Where does the time go?

    I've added a few details here and there on Fort Valley. None of them are super sophisticated, just adding what I suspect may be found on a tug of this vintage.

    1. The dory is a temporary expedient. There should probably be a Whitehall or peapod type of boat up there, but until one of them happens the dory will do.

    2. The oil drum with a hand pump.

    3. Aft stbd corner of the deck house roof.

    4. Aft port corner of the deckhouse. If davits and another boat go here, the chains will be removed. Also apparent in this photo is the mounting and stay of the aft mast.

    5. Some of the deck clutter. A pallet with a few fathoms of wire, and a couple five gallon cans.

    6. A shot of the deck downspouts. A lot of the early boats had a raised perimeter around the roof of the deck houses and pilot house to direct rain water so it didn't just wash over the edge and down the bulkheads. There were downspouts fitted to carry the rain water off to the next lower deck and ultimately to the main deck and the scuppers. There will be downspouts fitted aft of the skipper's house, and two places on each side of the main house.

    7. The galley stack. Since the smoker is on it's own ESC, I'm contemplating a valving affair to shunt a little smoke to this stack as well. (Too bad I couldn't make it smell like bacon, eggs, and biscuits!😊)
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 40 Views
    7
    2
    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    5 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thanks for the comments!

    Newby, it'll take a lot of cans to make any upgrades to this old bucket! 😊
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 55 Views
    2
    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    5 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    A quick update on the engine room ventilators.

    The main tube is just plastic water pipe with the bell being a resin cast from a custom made master.
    The screens would have been galvanized and removable.
    ToraDog asked me how many birds did I anticipate encountering while out at sea. Picky, picky, picky. 😊
    Actually, it wasn't birds that I was concerned with, it was the candy wrappers and empty beer cans from the deckies that became a nuisance.
    I have rarely seen these screens, but they seemed like a good idea and another unusual attribute to add to "Fort Valley".
    The plenum boxes were made up of scrap material and provide a firm base allowing the vents to rotate which will indeed funnel air to the "engine room" spaces.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 56 Views
    8
    2
    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    With the good weather and the gardens to tend, bench time has been scarce. Nonetheless, I have been able to get a little time here and there.
    All of the changes/additions have been subtle, but I like to think add to the whole.

    Images:

    1. Checking out the distressed vessel.

    2. Engine room ventilators under construction. The "ears"
    are grab handles to allow turning the ventilators to best
    advantage.

    3 & 4. Boarding ladders. One new, one with a little
    weather on it.

    5. Everyone was complaining the step into the pilot house
    was too high so now there's a couple steps.

    6 & 7. The emergency steering block and tackle. The tiller
    will be mounted on brackets fastened to the after
    house bulkhead.

    8. Certainly some need for a little house-keeping here,
    but the steering tackle, tiller, hawser, heaving line, and
    messenger are all visible.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 60 Views
    10
    4
    πŸ’¬ Re: Maiden voyage
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Congratulations!
    Beautiful build and "Ellen" looks wonderful afloat!

    Well done!
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 86 Views
    3
    πŸ’¬ Re: 39' Windboats Fairwind. Decks, cabin sides, companionway steps.
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Looking good Ed!
    The clever engineering is even more apparent in person.πŸ‘
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 102 Views
    2
    πŸ’¬ Re: Mast hoops
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Another method I've used is to plane down an ash board to the thickness of the height of the proposed mast hoop then using a hand plane cutting (shaving) strips off of the edge. These strips come off with a natural curl and can be installed on the mast then glued.
    The prototype would add one extra hoop as a spare in the event one gets broken.

    I'm thoroughly enjoying this build Graham!
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 128 Views
    3
    πŸ“ Smoke/Steam Generators.
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thinking about this, it's ironic that we put smokers in our models to prove the stacks work. In reality, an engineer takes pride in how clean he can make steam, (with the exception of blowing tubes which is generally done at night with the bridge's permission. Often we'd change course for a few minutes so the blown soot wouldn't get all over our decks or heaven forbid get into the pilot house!)
    There are usually stack mirrors installed on ships so the fire room can see up the inside of the stack how clean their fires are without having to go topside.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 34 Views
    4
    πŸ“ Smoke/Steam Generators.
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    I don't have any video of "Fort Valley" underway, but here's a couple of stills with the smoker operating.
    It's a petrol based unit that is controlled on a rheostat independent of the main motor RPM. (There's a "chapter" dedicated to this in the "Phantom Tug" build blog.)
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 36 Views
    7
    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thank you Martin. It's still a work in progress, but I'm gaining on her.

    Ron, my puddle is just too small to get a good feel for her characteristics. Good for testing ballast, and controls, but not sufficient for a good run.

    Brightwork, "Fort Valley" is a composite of things I liked from a search of images on the net and books. She would remind one of "Chippewa" for sure!

    Thank you Stephen. My waders help make the photos possible. Launching, ballasting, then walking around or turning her taking photos from water level make all the difference as opposed to standing on the bank looking down.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 69 Views
    3
    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    Fourteen,

    Not exactly any building, but more of a proving what's been built.
    Fort Valley went overboard today for the first run of the season. She did well without making a drop of water with all of the systems working and nothing got hot. The only place smoke was let out was through the stack 😊

    I use "bean bags" of lead shot (diver's weights) for ballast and have decided I need to build cribs to place them consistently. I know "two red, one blue forward of the battery, and "two red, one blue, and a yellow aft of the shaft log oiler". Even though they don't shift underway, the correct placement is important for trim and list. There's no way this old man is going to ballast the boat on the hard then launch it, so ballasting afloat is mandatory and it's discouraging to get her all set, and head her out with a four degree list only to bring her back and move a yellow bag an inch inboard towards the centerline.

    A few of images from today.....
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 71 Views
    11
    6
    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thank you.

    I'm getting a little anxious for a float too. The weather hasn't been very accommodating, and when it is good there's other things that have to be done. I may end up putting her overboard in my own little puddle just for a minor shake-down run.
    There's still some items on the "to do" list. A few more months of tinkering........
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 78 Views
    1
    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thank you all for the positive comments!

    "Fort Valley" is still a work in progress although it will make several outings this season.
    There's still a lot of detailing to do which hopefully will add to the character. Lighting, deck clutter and visible interior spaces will be furnished next winter.

    Steve, that's the engineer trying to explain to Ms Maude why she can't hang the galley towels and ship's laundry in the engine room to dry. 😊
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 82 Views
    1
    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    Thirteen

    Finally! Pilot house windows and the railings on the 01 deck (deckhouse roof).
    The corner windows of the pilot house are curved and it took a little experimenting to get them to, then stay in the proper arc. Trying a couple different plastics and methods with several failures at least showed me what wouldn't work. Some had too much memory and would bend fine, but wouldn't stay curved, some was too brittle and resisted bending at all.
    I usually use the plastic one finds in a blister pack that is the packaging for something found hanging on a peg in the hardware or big box stores. Sometimes these packs are already the proper shape and only need trimming to become their new purpose. (A small square or rectangle clear plastic bubble containing a half dozen #2 screws can be cut around the edge, painted, and be reincarnated as a galley sink. A small round one can become a radar dome. I am guilty of buying something that I "may use someday" just for the packaging which was perfect for the project at hand.😊)
    I digress. What I ended up using was a "jewel case" that started out as the home for a CD or DVD. This plastic is crystal clear, cuts easily by scoring several times and snapping apart, and although a little thick for the scale of the tug, doesn't show once installed in the window frame. It will not bend in a cold state so building a buck with the proper arc was necessary then using a heat gun (hair dryer) gently warming the piece and forming it to the buck. Discovering the right amount of heat was trial and error. Too little and nothing happens, then all of a sudden there's too much and the plastic curls and deforms. Another issue was although the plastic looked clean, the heat brought out any fingerprints or imperfections. Cleaning thoroughly with alcohol was necessary. Fortunately I only needed two!

    The stanchions needed to be 55mm tall to have the correct height for the top rail. When they came in the mail they were in fact 55mm tall, but that included the threaded mounting stud on the bottom. I ended up using some .043 ID tubing cut to length that would allow a 6mm taller stanchion. After cutting the lower section of the stanchion in two and inserting the cut pieces in either end of the tube and soldering, the top rail was the required height to scale. After drilling and tapping all of the holes, the stanchions were screwed into the deck and checked to be certain the railing holes were lined up. All that remained was inserting the railings then painting the installation.

    The photos:

    1 & 2. The curved corner windows. This vintage tug had
    windows that slid down in a track. They were lifted
    and secured with a leather strap.

    3 - 5 The railing installed and painted

    6 The over all state of the build to date.

    7 Although only a slight difference, the shorter
    stanchion would have made the figures look too
    tall for the scale.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 83 Views
    9
    9
    πŸ“ Mental Health & Wellbeing Volunteers
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Ron, my daughter is in Toledo and sent me a photo of her snow in exasperation. Her comment (in all caps...)

    I'M DONE WITH IT!!

    I suggested she move to Maine where it was sunny and bright. 😊
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 52 Views
    2
    πŸ“ Advice request regarding Prop dimensions
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    I'm certainly not an expert on the matter and can't provide the marine engineer's explanation of the pro's and con's of outboard vs inboard turning wheels, but can say from experience that in a scale model the inboard turning wheels provide the best looking wake. (Aft looking forward, port turning clockwise, stbd turning counter clockwise.)
    I don't know if the better performance of either direction could be determined (that is to say would we notice any difference either way...) on our scale equipment, but my gut feel is in-turning wheels throw the water towards the center creating more of a stern wave.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 37 Views
    4
    πŸ“ Sea Commander
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    I mounted a receiver directly to a speaker box with velcro with no ill effects.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 34 Views
    1
    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug (Fort Valley)
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thank you ToraDog!
    It was a conversation we had quite a while ago that prompted the stand-alone ESC for the smoker.

    The best part of the last snow was it couldn't last!

    As for the tug, it's fast getting to be time to tidy up a couple of items and even though it won't be finished, it'll be sea worthy for this coming season. Next fall will see it back on the bench for some more detailing. There's a couple of idea's I have rattling around in my brain bucket that I'd like to experiment with....
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 88 Views
    3
    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug (Fort Valley)
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Thank you Ron. For me, half the fun of this hobby is figuring out another way to accomplish something.

    Steve, you're absolutely right! In the original configuration there were places under the smoker that were virtually inaccessible, (my poor design,) and although not very "hot" the fuel for these if spilled, or if even a few drops somehow found it's way to the bilge certainly makes a mess. I've just about come to the conclusion that any build I do in the future will have a metal catch can/tray under the smoker if one is installed.

    Martin, so glad to see you back! You're right about the dog and the sardines. If he got a whiff of them he'd come and sit in front of me smiling until I gave him some. Nothing worse than a dog with sardine breath!😊
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 94 Views
    2
    πŸ“ Phantom Tug (Fort Valley)
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    View All
    Twelve...

    The weather has finally broken in the NE US and a lot of time has gone into spring clean up and getting ready for the new season. During the winter there's no incentive to go outside at all, so the tug building can progress at a steady albeit slow pace. (I'm not very fast, but I sure am slow....).
    The smoker relocation was done in anticipation of this season's running.

    There were a couple of factors leading up to the new mount for the smoker. One was to eliminate a nuisance, another was to take a little heat out of the "engine room" (although in the space it was in and the volume of fresh air circulating through, heat wasn't a real issue. Potential leakage and visibility around the unit was an issue to me, and this modification helps in that aspect.)

    The unit was originally mounted adjacent to the main motor with a pipe extending from the top of the unit towards the centerline at a slight angle then vertical to penetrate the 01 deck and engage the stack. This seemed a little cumbersome. Every time the smoker needed fuel, or the fuel level checked, the deckhouse had to be removed and set aside to accomplish this. Once completed, resetting the house while lining up the stack and doing this all while the tug was waterborne was sometimes a troublesome proposition particularly if there were wakes, a light breeze, or any wave action. (before I hauled the 50 lb boat out of the water just to check the fuel I would turn off the smoker and claim the engineers were burning anthracite coal in harbor mode!)

    Another issue was this scenario; you've been operating the boat for a period of time. The boat is on the far side of the pond, and you've been running pretty good - not hard, but perhaps 2/3rds. The smoker manufacturer recommends wiring the unit in parallel to the motor so the ESC controls the smoker in concert with the main motor. You notice there's not much smoke coming from the stack and you're a pretty good run back to the landing. Decision: run hard to shorten the run in a potentially dry condition, or take twice the time idling back hoping to keep the smoker coil at a minimum temperature so it doesn't damage itself or the boat. (This particular unit has no failsafe and in the instructions in all caps "DO NOT RUN DRY!") Well, Cap' what'r'you gonna do?

    Here's my solution after actually experiencing the above situation. (I did burn a hole through the bottom of the unit for this boat.)

    Figuring the warranty was probably shot anyway,(πŸ˜€) I cut and glued a metal plate to the underside of the smoker with "JB Weld". I have used this stuff in several situations and it has proven worthy of this sort of job. My dog and I shared a tin of sardines so I could claim the tin for a catch-can since the size was appropriate for the purpose.
    I had a channel on my radio open that used an on/off toggle and a rheostat so incorporated a Pico switch and stand alone ESC to operate the smoke unit.
    With this system I can lay at the dock with just a wisp of smoke and no turns on or increase the smoke to full capacity at will. If the boat is a long ways off and the smoke is declining, turn off the unit altogether and bring the boat back, or turn it off, carry on and service the unit later.

    The mounting of the unit to the underside of the 01 deck has proved advantageous in that the deckhouse can remain in place, fuel can be checked/added easily, and there's plenty of air around the unit. If there is a failure it would be readily apparent and contained. In this build having the few extra ounces relatively high has had no effect whatsoever.

    The photos:
    1. The burned-out bottom of the unit.

    2-6 The fitting fabricated to allow filling and checking the
    smoke unit from above the 01 deck eliminating the
    need to remove the entire deckhouse.

    7-8 The smoke unit and the high-tech catch can.

    9 The assembled unit.

    10 The unit mounted to the underside of the 01 deck.

    11-12 All that shows topside is the fabricated elongated
    mounting studs and the fill pipe.

    13 Fittings covered and disguised under the engine room
    vent house.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comments
    πŸ‘€ 98 Views
    9
    7
    πŸ“ ATTENTION ON DECK.
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    Happy to see you on the mend Martin! πŸ‘
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 36 Views
    1
    πŸ“ Other than boat building, what authors do you read?
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    I remember "Swallows And Amazons", an island, a trusting mother, but don't remember the kids names.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ“ Reply
    πŸ‘€ 47 Views
    1
    πŸ’¬ Re: One more thing
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
    Flag
    To add to Toradog's comments, another detail is too much rudder angle is as bad as not enough. Anything over about 35 degrees of rudder throw begins to become a detriment leading to some of the symptoms you described. In most cases and tight quarters, max rudder (at 35 degrees) and a momentary increase in RPM may help a turn.
    πŸ‘ Like
    πŸ’¬ Comment
    πŸ‘€ 67 Views
    3


    About This Website
    Terms of Service
    Privacy Policy
    Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info