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    Black Shoe
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    Member No.#5969
    Registered๐Ÿ“…30th Aug 2020
    Last Online๐Ÿ“…10th Dec 2022
    City๐Ÿ“Portland Maine
    Country๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธUnited States
    Genderโ™‚๏ธMale
    Age๐Ÿ‘ถ79
    Posts๐Ÿ’ฌ129
    Followers๐Ÿ“ฃ4
    Likes Received๐Ÿ‘488

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    ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง Rookysailor ( Commodore)
    ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ EdH ( Midshipman)
    ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง Scratchbuilder ( Captain)
    ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ Ron ( Rear Admiral)
    4 Followers
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    Liked Swampscott Dory 3 days ago
    Liked More detailing up to the current state of the build 1 month ago
    Liked The Schooners arrived in Mahone Bay 4 months ago
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    "Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment." Will Rogers.
    About
    Just an old retired duffer who's primary job is to let the dog out, let the dog in, let the dog out, repeat.......
    Members Harbour
    Harbor Tug "Fort Valley"
    Tug "Fort Valley" was the recent subject of a build blog. She's scratch built plank on bulkhead/frame and sheathed from the deck down in 2oz fiberglass cloth. She's not of any particular tug, but rather representative of a class of harbor tug found in the early 1900's.
    U.S. Coast Guard 40' UTB 40535
    This is a 1:12 scale 40 footer that was part of the US Coast Guard's main harbor and inshore search and rescue (SAR) fleet. I served as engineer on a couple of these in the early '60's. They had a pair of GM 6-71's and the water expansion tanks actually had "GM" cast into them. At some point it was deemed PC to change that to "Detroit". The figures are modified action figures. Some plastic surgery, Squadron Putty, and a couple of old school "Dixie Cup" hats made them into sailors. This boat represents the MK IV version, but the boat's number won't show up in any archive as for some reason the 40535 number was skipped. I thought I'd fill the gap.
    The River Supply Company (RSC) Docks
    This isn't actually a boat, but it floats and boats use them, so with your permission I submit the River Supply Company headquarters. This isn't a diorama in the strictest sense, but allows a little imagination and some story telling. The "barn doors" open and close, the dock lights and "office" lights are on two separate circuits, The fish cleaning station is actually plumbed for water, there is the obligatory shop radio, and there is an anchoring system all remotely controlled. It is rather a nuisance to launch and retrieve, but if the weather permits during the summer it may stay in the pond for two or three days at a time. There is another dock that augments this one creating a total of 16 linear feet (32' using both sides,) at 1:18 scale for "fleet" dockage.
    "Nonesuch" and barge "Asset #1"
    "Nonesuch" is a 1:18 scale typical inland river pushboat found on most waterways in the US. She pushes a scale 75' barge equipped with a boom for hauling snags (fallen trees and other hazards to navigation,) and gear aboard for servicing the larger line boats. Two wheels, steering and flanking rudders, lights, sound, and the normal clutter found on these vessels. The towboat can be operated independent of the barge.
    Galley News
    This boat represents a small inter-island coastal freighter that would carry almost anything from the mainland to the islands of any coast. I don't know what the actual speed is, but it is just slightly faster than scale. It has a 6V battery that I have never run down on an outing. Galley is hard chined, very responsive, and (I think) presents well on the water.
    Recent Posts
    ๐Ÿ“ Swampscott Dory
    3 days ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Looks good Ron!

    It might be worth saving the pieces that your "good parts" came from and use them as templates to trace out for another dory.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Re: Samuel B Richmond
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Hi Stan,

    Welcome aboard!
    I just happened onto your build of Sam Richmond. This is a subject close to my heart. In the late '60's I was stationed in CGC Lantana out of Owensboro. One of our regular stops was Paducah. After Lantana it was Kanawha out of Memphis on the Mississippi. Good duty.

    It always amazed me how many acres of barges these boats could push.
    The only problem I've come across with these subjects is if one built a set of scale barges to replicate a full tow, they'd cover an awful lot of model pond๐Ÿ˜Š.

    I'll be following your build with interest!
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Yeah, but it was a package deal with the Cranberry Isle Lobster Boat, Honey
    5 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    I haven't learned much in my dotage, but have developed a system to divide "wants" from "needs".
    When I see something I really, really "want", I tell myself I can have it in three days. After two days I revisit the item and if it's gone I didn't need it. If it's still available and now I only "really" want it, some of the pressure is off, and if I wait one more day and still "want" it, the item becomes a "need". Then I rationalize that since I can't take the $$ with me when I go, I may as well do my civic duty and spread it around while I'm here.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Judy B
    5 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Good looking tug!๐Ÿ‘
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    ๐Ÿ“ Sea trials next week
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Very nice profile photo! I too am looking forward to your trials....
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    ๐Ÿ“ Graupner 638 lamps also called caged bulbs
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Thanks Doug. I'll check those settings.

    If my CCD's become OCD, I'll be SOL. ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ˜

    (Sorry for the hijack Len.)
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    ๐Ÿ“ Graupner 638 lamps also called caged bulbs
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Thank you.

    Dang! Doug beat me to the draw again!๐Ÿ˜Š

    Evans is indeed the source. Very cool stuff available through them. A worthwhile address to have.

    The 3mm LED's would fit in the printed globes, but may prove to be too bright unless you lowered your voltage. I used the "nano chips" rated at 12V, but run them on 6V. The chips are on one side of the leads and if you install them facing the bulkhead that the light fixture is mounted against it seems to diffuse the light a little more. I'm not a photographer so don't know all the proper settings, but my point-and-shoot seems to make the lights in the photos brighter than they really are.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Graupner 638 lamps also called caged bulbs
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    That's the one. Thank you Doug.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Graupner 638 lamps also called caged bulbs
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Here's the link provided by ToraDog:

    (Sorry, the site won't let me post the link. The information in my previous post is the work-around. It'll get you to the same place.)
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    ๐Ÿ“ Graupner 638 lamps also called caged bulbs
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Hi Len,
    ToraDog gave me a head's up that you were looking for deck lights.
    I haven't seen any of the Graupner fittings you've requested, but maybe an acceptable alternative would be some printed globes. I got mine from a Jan De Witte through Shapeways. I forget the actual size, but I asked Jan about a specific height in mm because I'm working in 1:18 scale. If you go to Shapeways and search for "Caged Deck Lights" they should be on the first page listed as 1:25. I used nano LED chips to light them for a couple of reasons. They don't get hot, they're not super bright, and as the name implies are very small. As for the cage I went to a craft store and bought a super fine paint pen. These come in colors and I found them to be the easiest to paint the "cage" part. The gold color looks enough like bronze to work well I think.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Harbor Tug "Fort Valley"
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Thank you.

    "Fort' does look a lot like Chippewa, but I don't think it's near as clean!๐Ÿ˜Š
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    ๐Ÿ“ Island Freighter
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    After installing and proving the running gear and electricals, work could begin topside. To this point the ship didn't have a name and wouldn't until it started to develop a personality.
    Creating a couple of hatches 'midships allows access the internals. I moved the deckhouse aft and added a table and awning on the 01 deck for the crew. The bos'n has a lounge chair, book, and bottle of wine on the 02 deck.
    Down and forward of the house there's a crewman doing some hot work on the main boom. The gas bottles are just turned dowels and the "hose" is a piece of wire. The mast was reconfigured as was the fore deck. The winch that the main power switch is under is located forward of the mast, and just aft of the fo'csle deck.
    A printed wooden deck, metal stanchions, and some non stock details were added forward.
    The mounting/cradle has a little activity under the stern repairing a wheel that has apparently come up against hard times.
    Although this build was ten years ago, it still runs.
    It's a little faster than scale, but that's fine, using the kit wheel has proven more than adequate. It will heel a little at full speed and a crash turn, but recovers very quickly with the ballast installed.
    The "rust" is simply rusty water brushed on from a jar full of salt water and nails that is left on the shelf then shaken up when needed. The paints are all acrylic water based.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Harbor Tug "Fort Valley"
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Tug "Fort Valley" was the recent subject of a build blog. She's scratch built plank on bulkhead/frame and sheathed from the deck down in 2oz fiberglass cloth.
    She's not of any particular tug, but rather representative of a class of harbor tug found in the early 1900's.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Tramp Freighter
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    The electrical system is very basic. The main switch is under the forward winch. Sliding the winch port turns everything on, to stbd turns the main power off.
    Although it looks pretty grim in the photo, the ballast used was buckshot spooned in to strategic places, then a lit candle held over the area allowing the wax drippings to encase the shot and prevent it from moving. Should the need arise, it'll be easy to remove the ballast with the same spoon.
    The lighting is rather crude as I hadn't been introduced to LED's at this point and was using grain of wheat bulbs. Running them at a much lower voltage provided the visual effect even though they didn't project any significant amount of light and didn't get warm.
    One switch is running lights, the other was deck lights.
    The ESC is an early "Action" unit (Now "Component Shop".) The motor was something rescued from the junk drawer. A standard rx, and mini servo for steering.
    The rudder was enhanced a little from the kit size, but the propeller from the kit proved adequate and actually provided more than scale speed without causing any issues with the rest of the system.

    I'll explore some of the external details in the next post. Thank you...
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Island Freighter "Son Of Jamaica"
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    No worries. I use one radio capable of several different models, but only attempt operating one at a time. I do OK with right and left when the model is going away from me, but have to think when it's coming towards me. I can't imagine two at a time.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Island Freighter "Son Of Jamaica"
    6 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Thank you Roy.

    You're right, there can't be much more than a ripple on the surface of the pond, and nothing more than a light breeze either. One also has to be aware of wakes from other operators as well.
    Although these can be sealed to prevent any water getting inside, operating in adverse conditions takes some of the satisfaction out of the equation. On the positive side, a model of this size can be kept in a ready state in a special built box in the back of a car and at a moment's notice can be underway in any suitable small pond one comes across.
    There is a shallow water garden out back that is my wife's hobby. Although it's not deep or very large it's fine to put a boat this size over the side and operate for a few minutes. I tell her it's my therapy.๐Ÿ˜Š
    I'm sorry, I don't know "Tx's"?

    A few images of the boat in a small body of water.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Island Freighter "Son Of Jamaica"
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    This correctly titled would be considered a "Built Log".
    The subject is a heavily kit-bashed Lindberg North Atlantic Fishing Trawler.
    It was built in 2012 and modified from the described kit not only in appearance, but also to include basic RC capabilities. Forward, reverse, rudder, with port and starboard lights.
    This was an exercise undertaken on a whim to discover if the Lindberg "fleet" of this scale could be successfully RC'd. The kit-bashing aspect was just to create something different. Utilizing the trawler, tuna boat, tug, lightship, and shrimper and building each stock, then building a second model of each one to a different style/configuration, would create a fleet of boats that could easily fit in the back of a standard sedan with room to spare. Another plus is the ability to carry the boat and radio to the water in one trip.
    The only real downside is the pond being run in has to be pretty flat as a duck wake could be problematic.๐Ÿ˜Š

    Photo's

    1. An image of the final result.

    2. & 3. Accomplishing float tests in a wall paper wetting trough. This hull comes in two parts and is designed for a static display. The first test included checking for any leaks after joining the hull halves with epoxy.

    4. & 5. Adding the electronics and superstructure parts that will be used during the build to establish a working waterline and determine a guesstimate as to how much ballast will be needed.

    6. Comparing a box stock quick build as Lindberg provided, against the potential deviations.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Tug Fort Valley
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Good idea! A couple of of 1:96's would do nicely. I could run year 'round, easy in, easy out, and when done with the model I could give the dog a bath!

    Sounds like a plan!๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ˜€
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Tug Fort Valley
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Thank you all!

    ToraDog, The "Launch System" took a nap when he got home. ๐Ÿ˜€๐Ÿ˜€
    Hip boots, carry the hull to waterside, then the deckhouse, then carry the ballast. Put on the hip boots, launch the hull, (apologize to the tadpoles that didn't move quick enough,) place ballast, check the propulsion system, install the deckhouse, and get underway. ๐Ÿ‘
    (After everything was loaded into the car there wasn't room for the cart, so had to fall back to the "Old School" system.)
    When it was time to pack it in, the procedure is reversed, get home, unload the car, and this old man crashes for an hour.๐Ÿ˜ด
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    ๐Ÿ“ Tug Fort Valley
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Finally had a chance to put the tug overboard for some extended running today. The weather was breezy with occasional gusts, but not so bad as to stir up too much wave action. Having recently scaled all of the components (hull, deckhouse, and added ballast,) it was discovered the complete unit weighs in at 61lbs 4oz. and being relatively heavy the boat was very stable.

    I wasn't able to get any videos, but did manage a few stills...
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fisher 44
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Don't despair Graham. The time wasn't wasted. I have experienced those dead ends more than I care to admit, but have come to believe that these are learning experiences. I call them positive negatives. They have taught me what not to do next time.๐Ÿ˜Š

    Your hanging basket idea will indeed be a novelty!๐Ÿ‘
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    ๐Ÿ“ First Post . Paint Advice for 1900s tug
    7 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    I'll agree with the others concerning the matte/flat colors. My only other suggestion would be to visit a big box store that will mix color samples of house paint. (Here in the US, a sample large enough to paint a large hull twice runs about $4.00 US.) I've recently painted a tug with acrylic paints by brush in a very dark - nearly black - brown color called "Fired Earth ". It looks like a sun faded, salt water abused black. These stores have racks of color sample cards and in them you can find any color under the sun. One of the side benefits of matte paint is touch up is easy, brush strokes don't show, and since the model won't live in the water full time, the acrylic stands up very well.
    The deckhouse could also be a matte color.
    The "Hot Rod" red primer is good for the bottom as mentioned, as well as a verdigris (blue/green color) which would have been a copper-ladened coating to discourage marine growth.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fisher 44 (Motor sail )
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Will the fantail stern be vertical, or have a little tumblehome? If it's vertical, maybe soaking two layers of thinner material (half the thickness of the planking,) will make the radius. If there's a little tumblehome your planking will have to have a crescent shape to lay flat on your deck frames.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fort Valley
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Thank you all for your positive comments. They're very gratifying. Thank you.

    Stephen, the helmsman is leaning against the chart table waiting for everyone to get their act together so they can move in and pick up their tow.๐Ÿ˜Š

    Thank you Ron. These details are usually gleaned from the day to day workings of another life several years ago.

    Len, you're more than welcome to use anything you see. Truth be told, I most likely plagiarized the ideas from photos, or previous work experiences anyway.๐Ÿ‘

    ToraDog, My efforts are not nearly as intricate as your builds, but thank you! Your research on your builds far exceeds my efforts.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Fort Valley
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    This is an overdue semi wrap-up of the scratch built tug Fort Valley. As things "to do" occur to me, they may be added, but with the float season approaching I thought I better tie up all the lose ends and make ready for the better weather.

    The lighting may be enhanced next building season with a few interior lights, and more "required" nav. lights, but unless FV is towing a barge, the towing lights wouldn't be exhibited, so at the moment these lights aren't necessary. The deck lights, normal running lights, pilot house lights, and the last post's stack lights are all installed and operational.

    A separate control board was designed for installation in the deck house with it's own receiver for these circuits which precludes any need for an umbilical cord from the hull to the house. (The rationale for this was mentioned in an earlier post.)

    Several crew members have been modified with "plastic surgery", "told off" (assigned tasks) and are busy checking gear in the small boat, scraping and painting, and stowing gear.

    I anticipate building a Whitehall-type small boat and will add it to the 01 deck in the future. Although the dory seems a little atypical, it wouldn't be out of the ordinary in a workboat venue being seaworthy and inexpensive to replace.

    I've included a few photos of how I create a "tarp" boat cover that I hope may be helpful.

    The photos:

    1. & 2.
    A couple of interim images taken early last summer.

    3. Through 8.
    The line handling boat. The tarp is created using tissue paper of the type found in a new shirt box. This is cut to roughly the finished size leaving ample for hanging over the cap rails of the boat. A strong back is made to support the paper down the middle, then the paper is put in place and dampened to create the desired rough shape. When the paper is dried, it's sprayed with a matte finish from a rattle can. While this is still wet, the "tarp" is given it's final shape. (The paper is very fragile at this point) Once the matte finish is dry the paper is strong enough to support a couple coats of acrylic artist colors mixed up by the droplet and just enough water to create a wash. The underside is deliberately darker because of the outside "fading" from "sun exposer".

    9.&10
    A deckhand is checking the equipment in the dory.

    11.
    Here we have the heaving line fastened to the messenger, which is in turn fastened to the light hawser, all of which is laid out on the drying grates.

    12.&13.
    Another deckhand is scraping, sanding, and painting an 01 deck storage box. There are two of these one port and one stbd. The paint brush and paint can is made up of scrap cut-offs. The bos'n insisted on the drop cloth.

    14.
    The ubiquitous swab rack with a splayed swab, scrub brush, and broom.

    15.&16
    An oil drum, with a hand pump and measuring can.

    17.&18.
    The owner on a day trip, and another angle into the pilot house.

    19.
    A deckhand laying out the bow line. Under the grating in the square hatch are the switches to activate the main and auxiliary electrical circuits.

    20.
    "Cap" keeping an eye on things.

    21. Through 24.
    General deck lighting.

    25.&26
    The panel made up to control the lighting and maybe future auxiliary systems. This consists of a couple of voltage reducers and a set of Pico switches which are controlled by the transmitter through
    an additional receiver incorporated in the panel.
    The panel actually lives in the deckhouse on a couple of shoulders built in for the purpose. Power to the panel is delivered through the clips seen on the forward coaming edge.

    27.
    Although a little too bright in this image, (The camera seems to exaggerate the ambient light,) the stack lighting is prevalent although not as intense as it appears.

    Fort Valley has been a fun build. Thank you for your patience through the "Never ending story".๐Ÿ˜€
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Sail making
    8 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    Sorry to jump in so late, but it may be worth a try to use a heat gun, (hair dryer, or maybe even an iron on low heat) to soften the tapes glue. Then gently peel the layers away and replace the offending area.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Teak decks
    9 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    I don't know if it's any help, but USCGC Barque Eagle has (had in 1980) teak planks essentially a nominal 2X4. (1 3/4" X 3 3/4").
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    ๐Ÿ“ Another excursion
    10 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    When I worked on the rivers every once in a while an old boat would pass by and there'd be the faintest hint of orange color at the top of the stack at night. If there was any exhaust smoke at all this would have a hue to it as well, although the color was invisible during the daylight hours. Of course this was years ago and the current rules and regulations would probably prevent anything remotely close to this happening today.

    I decided to try and duplicate the look of a coal fire deep in the bowels of the boiler whose fringes just barely lit the exhaust in the stack.

    Having a light (LED) too close to the top of the stack produced a too bright light. Having it at the base didn't provide enough. My solution was to mount two lights port and stbd in the stack base, and mount a couple of acrylic rods on top of them terminating a couple of inches below the top rim of the stack. The rods were lightly (๐Ÿ™„) sanded and rounded on top to diffuse the light making it softer and much less directional.

    The mounting "hardware" is just a lash-up of available piece/parts to accomplish the desired end result.

    1. The base with the LED's. The black taped cylinders are "light traps". These are just tubes that fit over the LED and stabilize the bottom of the acrylic rod over the chips.

    2. One side lifted to demonstrate the "trap" effect.

    3. Both traps engaged.

    4.&5. Off, and On.

    6. Light showing from the top of the stack. If the light proves too bright a turn of tape, a lower voltage, or both may be used.

    The actual smoke discharge is through an aluminum tube that exits an inch or so above the tips of the rods which hopefully ๐Ÿคž will keep the ends of the rods from sooting up.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Fort Valley Deck Lockers
    10 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    .....and already it's February. The cold days are long, but the weeks seem to be moving faster and faster. It must be the age thing old people talk about.๐Ÿ˜Š

    I've added a couple details to Fort Valley.
    The deck boxes were a place where all the "stuff" went. These lockers are on the 01 deck on either side of the stack.
    As you see, there's deck equipment and parts in the stbd locker and there's a crew member sanding and repainting the port one. He is being careful of the deck with a drop cloth and was careful to put his paint can and brush on it before he incurred the Mate's wrath.

    In images #'s 1,2, and 3, it doesn't appear so, but the boxes are identical in size.

    Image #4, is the stbd locker with bosun's stores.

    Images #5 through 8 are the port locker being repainted. The deck hand in these photos has had some "plastic surgery" and is yet to be completed with the proper shirt and trousers.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Doing a barge for my tugboats
    12 months ago by Black Shoe ( Warrant Officer)
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    That was a lame comment about the hydraulics...๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ‘
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    ๐Ÿ‘€ 58 Views


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