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    mturpin013
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    Member No.#4473
    RegisteredπŸ“…15th Sep 2017
    Last OnlineπŸ“…15th Jun 2019
    CityπŸ“Leeds
    CountryπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§United Kingdom
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    AgeπŸ‘ΆNot Provided
    PostsπŸ’¬300
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    Recent Posts
    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    3 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Here is one of Robs original drawings
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    3 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Steve your right I did think of this but "too late" next time Ill do some planning before sticking!
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    πŸ“ Suction hose fittings
    4 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Well what can I say about suction hoses other than thanks to Rob for doing all the leg work to a great standard, all the drawings are well done and easy to follow. I’m a retired engineering toolmaker so the components are quickly machined, as Rob says the hardest part of this job is filing the square holes of the underwater part, which has the stainless steel mesh inside.
    One tip for drilling the 4 holes around the periphery is to leave the finished component on the parent material, this allows the component to be held in a vice or dividing head on a drilling machine or milling machine table without any damage to the finished surface, they can then be parted off when drilling operation is finished.
    I decided to drill the holes to a depth rather than through to make it accurate when fitting the four turn handles. The small handles were machined with a small ball end and parted off to an exact length.
    The fitting of the handles was a dilemma; should I solder then in or use an adhesive. I knew solder would be secure but cyno needed to be tested, so a dummy handle and hole were glued and after a few minutes I tried to pull it out, all I managed to do was destroy the handle and snap it. The solder option would result in some amount of cleaning up after with little chance of getting all the visible solder removed without an awful lot of fettling.
    I decided to use cyno being the quickest and cleanest, each handle was cleaned/degreased and a drop of cyno down each hole then quickly push the handle home (hence the accurate length of handle and depth of hole).
    Finally the stainless mesh was fabricated into a tube to slide inside the body, the end was formed using a 10mm flat bottomed hole, and an 8mm punch, and this was then formed in the press to form a cup. The end was then pressed into the body and both secured with a drop of epoxy.
    Now all the parts are finished they all get a coat of spray clear lacquer. Next on the list are the pipes.

    adhesive
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    πŸ“ Have I been Demoted
    9 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Doug, totally agree
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Maiden Voyage
    9 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Stuart you must be really pleased with how the boat has performed, I agree the speed looks about right and realistic so congratulations on you maiden voyage.
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    πŸ“ Site glitches!
    11 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Thanks Steve for your continued persistence in solving problems
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    πŸ’¬ Re: The ladders
    11 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Sorry Rob, (and any others wishing to purchase) IKEA don't sell disc sanders but LIDL do that's where I bought itπŸ™„
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    πŸ“ The ladders
    12 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Next in the line of adornments in the aft deck are the ladders, these were made from 2mm mahogany to the plan included in the kit. To make sure that all parts were identical I cut pieces to slightly longer and wider than required then clamped them together and drilled two 0.4mm holes through them all and tapped a 0.5mm brass pins through to hold them all together for machining. I made use of the Lidl disc sander and shaped the sandwiched block to the dimensions/profile taken from the drawing. I now disassembled the four pieces in preparation for drilling the holes which will determine the position of the stair runs. I need only to mark out one side piece so I can set the drilling machine stops to hold (by hand) each piece for drilling a single hole, then reset for the next hole/s until all pieces have a set of 4 identical holes. Next the stair pieces need to be made, again to the correct sizes as marked on the drawing (out with the sander). Having made the hole position of the sides so precise the same needed to be applied to the pre drilling of the stair runs, so I made a small jig to drill the pilot holes, just clamping each piece under the aluminium angle and spotting through each hole. Some final sanding of the individual pieces and then the assembly was put together using cyno adhesive. I wanted to include a brass stair lip on each step, so using some small angle brass, these were cut to extra length and then again using a small jig they were sanded to exact length; (trimming this small section brass is difficult for all the available sections so using the sander and an appropriate jig give a great finish). The brass pieces were stuck on each stair front using cyno. The ladders now need to be fitted in place, I used some brass angle on the rear of each step and then drilled and tapped the rear of the step 10BA. I could now drill a hole in the rear wall to clamp each step in place.

    kit
    cyno adhesive
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    πŸ“ Hints and Tips.
    12 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Sorry I didn't share!! but I've been doing this for some time. great idea. I must think more of my fellow modelers re good ideas
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    πŸ“ Problems uploading photos
    13 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I agree with Mouldbuilder if a cash injection is needed
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    πŸ“ Site glitches!
    14 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Still having this issue no pictures uploading
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    πŸ“ Re visit Rear upper deck & Aft cockpit deck
    14 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I have decided that the rear upper deck and the rear aft cockpit will be a one piece unit. After see another boat with a similar set but not both decks were joined. This means that the upper deck and lower deck and the sides of the cockpit will all be joined forming a box. This has a number of benefits these are:-
    1. It makes a water tight compartment which can be emptied if required. (except for the removable hatch I did in the initial build, this will have to have an β€œo” ring type seal)
    2. It makes it easier to get to the servo area without taking all the smaller parts out e.g. foam tanks ladders etc.
    3. Fitting the ladders made easier with a single 10 BA bolt
    Disadvantages
    A lot more work!.

    Because the individual parts are already made and in some cases painted I need to make sure that all surfaces that will require gluing are suitably abraded before applying any type adhesive. Additional work will be required around the top edge of the cockpit to give a lip to stop any water from entering the servo area. I decide this would look nice in mahogany to match the floor edging, along with some corner pieces in polished brass this edging will also add substantial rigidity to the whole structure.
    The mahogany was cut from a spare piece of old table top to 9mm by 6mm and then a 1.5 mm x 2mm deep groove was cut along the length to slot onto the top of the box section. The corner brass pieces were fabricated from 0.5 mm brass sheet and the joints soft soldered with a strengthening piece underneath.

    The box section sides were already made and painted so had to have their edges prepared for gluing by removing a 2mm wide strip along each edge. The area where the box fits had to be prepared with spacers of 0.6 mm card and strips of baking sheet to stop the glue sticking to the sides of the boat. This method ensures that the box fits exactly in its hole.
    After epoxying the box section to consolidate the Rear upper deck & Aft cockpit deck I could then glue the mahogany rail to the top along with the brass corners this was left to set overnight. The top rail was then radiused to finish it off and a first coat of varnish applied


     

    hatch
    piece
    baking sheet
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    πŸ“ 48inch Fairey Huntsman
    17 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I assume you have been following blog -"Fairey Huntsman 31"
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    πŸ’¬ Re: The Life Ring.
    21 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Nice job, there's a lot of satisfaction to be gained from doing a job when time is of no importance but the finish is
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Paint prep
    21 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Rob you've heard of a tight squeeze, well this is it. however its not really a problem as I also have a larger spray area in my garage with extraction so ill probably do it in there especially with the prospect of some warmer weather on its way.
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    πŸ“ Paint prep
    22 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    It’s time to start looking at some paint preparation as this is something that can be done alongside some of the remaining jobs. I have spent hours glassing the hull and deck and the cabin roofs and then finishing to a standard for the first coats of primer, this was achieved by progressing through various grades of wet and dry from 400 to 800. This gives a good adhesion surface for the first primer coat. As I have said in previous posts I made as many parts detachable as was practical, so on the forward cabin roof (which is in itself detachable) all parts are removed leaving a relatively flat surface to prepare, the underside was masked and then put in the queue for painting. Mid cabin and rear cabin roofs - again all parts were removed and placed in the queue/turntable,
    Spraying is a hazardous process whatever type of paint you use, so it’s essential that some sort of extraction is used and an appropriate face mask ( I use a P100 rated mask because it gives the highest level of protection in the widest variety of situations and will filter out 100% of both oil-based and non-oil-based particles.). This can also be used for most of my wood working activities, however; if this isn’t an option for you then I suggest you spray outdoors. My spray booth is made from an old cooker hood mounted in my workshop with a table below. On this I used plain sheets of hardboard which I made temporary fixings to hold a box together. The extraction element was a piece of old clothes dryer flexible 4” pipe which when I’m spraying hangs out of the window.
    Back to spraying, I use a compressor and small spray gun for this size of work so I purchased a litre of grey primer and 5 litres of thinners. I am no professional sprayer but have sprayed a number of cars in the past and I have learnt that once again ”Less is more” so a number of light coats is better than one thick coat that runs, meaning lots of sanding and a repeat performance of painting. First three coats of grey primer applied and I’m pleased with how it’s going. I took the opportunity to spray some of the other parts that were finished while the gun was full of primer. Spraying is one of those jobs which is over before it’s begun yet the preparation seems to take weeks but it always pays off in the end.
    Next will be a top coat of Appliance White.

    sprayer
    primer
    box
    turntable
    gun
    spray gun
    clothes dryer
    compressor
    cars
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    πŸ“ Finding a supplier of 2.00mm 2.5mm Ply
    24 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Raggie my local model shops has online both 2.00 & 2.5mm

    http://www.modelshopleeds.co.uk/catalog/advanced_search_resu...
    http://www.modelshopleeds.co.uk/catalog/advanced_search_result.php?keywords=wood
    πŸ”—
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Almost finished
    26 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Stuart the ply base jig you've made looks ideal, however you need to support the uprights so they cant move this can be done using small crocodile clips the type you get with a heavy cast base for electronics work. Deal with one joint at a time and silver solder the joint making sure your pieces are spotlessly clean (don't use abrasive paper, as the adhesive used to retain the grit can contaminate a clean joint) use fine grade steel wool 0000 grade. flux the joint, clean the solder and dip in flux. Heat the joint slowly watching for the flux bubbling and then becoming transparent this is then followed by the Joint starting to turn dull red. this is the point you start to introduce the solder to the heat - gently touch the joint with the solder and it should immediately melt onto the joint, remove the solder immediately. move the next joint.
    Stuart if you want more instruction send me a PM

    ply base jig
    adhesive
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    πŸ“ Post code
    28 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Hooton Park Trust
    Airfield Way, Ellesmere Port CH65 1BQ
    I think
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    πŸ“ Cruise Liners
    28 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Not sure about being alone, 3 out of 5,285 members seems alone to me, but have you ever been on a modern day cruise ship or cabin cruiser ? I would say "don't knock it unless you've tried it". However I have and would tend to agree that the older ships have some sort of character about them but to be fair the 20s and 30s travellers were a different breed to that of today's cruisers
    PS that's now 4 out of 5,285
    Keep smiling

    ships
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Rebuild rear deck Yorkshireman
    1 month ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    That's a job and a half, the results are looking really good keep it up
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    πŸ’¬ Re: WTC/Sub Driver.
    1 month ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    As far as I'm concerned its a boat that occasionally goes under the water by design not by accident.
    I look forward to further installments

    boat
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    πŸ“ Site glitches!
    1 month ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Dear camyaj
    I agree wholeheartedly with Doug, Stephen does this web site as a favour to us all and unfortunately there are quite a few people who don't appreciate it, we can all help by being patient and helping out by donating to the upkeep of the site.
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    πŸ“ Glue
    1 month ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I think this is a subject that many of us have pondered and discussed. I where possible try to use a single material for a particular structure so that the adhesive used is the recommended one for that material be it wood, metal, plastic, or glass plus the many variants of each. Then comes the issue of joining dissimilar materials for example styrene to wood styrene adhesive, so a contact adhesive or a specific epoxy could be suitable. However now you should also consider the type of joint you are using and the resultant forces that will be applied to the joint as this will greatly affect the adhesive used. I have uploaded a couple of charts which are just very basic concepts of joint type and possible adhesives but this is a subject that cant be covered in a simple blog
    PS Gorrila glue makes some interesting claimsπŸ™ˆπŸ™‰πŸ™Š
    good look

    adhesive
    contact adhesive
    wood styrene adhesive
    adhesives
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    πŸ“ Pictures
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Re-order, 'drag & drop Yes Please
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    πŸ’¬ Re: The Radio Aerial
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Hi Rob another great piece. I notice you use a plumbers mat for silver soldering, have you thought of using soldering blocks, they reflect the heat back onto the work allowing the required temperature to be achieved much quicker. Another even better type of block is the compressed charcoal blocks, although they are a bit more delicate, but some of the atmospheric changes in the heated/soldering area are an advantage to reducing oxidising elements in the joint area.

    plumbers mat
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    πŸ“ Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Been away on holiday for a few weeks so not been doing much but back at it again -

    Pulley blocks
    The mast has a small pulley block on each end of the cross bar, but I wanted to have a go at making them so using some 0.5mm I marked out the profile and then bent the flat pieces into a channel this was followed by drilling an 8BA clearance hole through both sides. Next I machined the centre pulley out of brass with a 2mm rad to suit the rope I will be using; I also did an extra round dummy pulley in steel to use as the template to file the radius on the frame and use as a guide for the width of the block. Using a smooth file I carefully filed the radius on each piece using the dummy pulley as a guide and trimmed the width, this was followed using wet and dry paper to finish. To fasten the blocks to the cross bar they need a screw fastening on the top, this was done by soldering an 8BA nut on the top. Finally the brass pulley wheel was secured in place with an 8BA nut and bolt, with a threaded stud in the top.


    Deck rigging screw eyes - can be bought, but again, I had to have a go, so first I ground a tool to form the end ball which would also part the piece off after it had been turned and threaded. The bar was turned down to the thread o/d and then using an 8BA die the diameter was threaded. I then used the form tool to produce the ball end, this worked OK but could be improved on as the final turned finish wasn’t as good as I’d hoped for, but I don’t have time to spend on this as I only wanted six eyes so the diameters will be finished with a small file and wet and dry. Turned pieces finished, next I set up a gang of slitting saws to mill the flats, holding each part in a split threaded clamp in the machine vice the flats were milled in parallel. Finally using the same clamp jig the ball was drilled with a 2mm hole again to suit the 2mm rope. There’s some final dressing to do before the parts are clear lacquered.

    pulley
    nut
    2mm rope
    machine
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Bollards!
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Well done that man, an innovative solution well executed. Have you considered a letter to Santa?
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Clamp widget
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Harvey just come across your build blog I am a bit further on with mine, just doing some paint experiments at present.You comment about your ability level, judging by your approach to prep before gluing and your innovative solution to clamping that doesn't seem in doubt. any way there's enough builders on here that have experienced everything you will come across in this build, so if in doubt give them a shout. I've just signed up to your blog - never stop learning
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Hull Pint job complete
    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Each modeler has different abilities and you should be proud of your achievements the paint job looks OK but you could easily improve the joint lines with some pinstripe tape a nice 2mm yellow would look good.
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