|||
Current Website Support
87
Contributors
11
Subscribers
You are Not Registered
Donate for your silver medal ๐Ÿ…
ยฃ10
ยฃ15
ยฃ25
ยฃ50
Subscribe for your gold medal ๐Ÿ…
ยฃ1
ยฃ3
ยฃ5
ยฃ10
You Will Be Helping Towards:

  • Domain Fees
  • Security Certificates
  • iOS & Android App Fees
  • Website Hosting
  • Fast Servers
  • Data Backups
  • Upkeep & Maintenance
  • Administration Costs

    Without your support the website wouldn't be what it is today.

    Please consider donating towards these fees to help keep us afloat.

    Read more

    All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

    Many thanks for your kind support
  • Join Us On Social Media!
    Model Boats Website
    Model Boats Website
    Home
    Forum
    Build Blogs
    Media Gallery
    Boat Clubs & Lakes
    Events
    Boat Harbour
    How-To Articles
    Plans & Docs
    Useful Links
    Registered
    21st Apr 2020
    Last Online
    30th Jun 2020
    peewit
    Member Stats
    Stats
    Member No.#5827
    Registered๐Ÿ“…21st Apr 2020
    Last Online๐Ÿ“…30th Jun 2020
    City๐Ÿ“Ipswich
    Country๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡งUnited Kingdom
    Genderโ“Not Provided
    Age๐Ÿ‘ถNot Provided
    Posts๐Ÿ’ฌ21
    Followers๐Ÿ“ฃ0
    Likes Received๐Ÿ‘44

    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Send Private Message
    Members Following
    Follow peewit
    peewit hasn't any followers yet
    0 Followers
    Recent Activity
    Liked Bionic Rower 2 months ago
    Liked Final reveal! 2 months ago
    Liked This Site 2 months ago
    Liked Re: "Genie" 2 months ago
    Liked Building Jig 2 months ago
    Liked Sails sewing 2 months ago
    Liked Maid of the LOCH 2 months ago
    Leading Seaman
    Ranks Points
    Fleet Admiral 10,000
    Admiral 8,000
    Vice Admiral 6,000
    Rear Admiral 5,000
    Commodore 4,000
    Captain 3,000
    Commander 2,500
    Lieutenant Commander 2,000
    Lieutenant 1,600
    Sub-Lieutenant 1,200
    Midshipman 900
    Warrant Officer 600
    Chief Petty Officer 1st Class 450
    Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class 300
    Petty Officer 1st Class 200
    Petty Officer 2nd Class 150
    Master Seaman 100
    Leading Seaman 50
    Able Seaman 20
    Recruit 0
    14 Points Away From Master Seaman!
    Points
    ActivityWorthAwarded
    ๐Ÿ‘ Likes (rcv'd)144
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Forum234
    โœ๏ธ Comments28
    โœ๏ธ Blog40
    ๐Ÿ“ท Photos40
    ๐ŸŽฅ Videos100
    ๐Ÿ“ Place80
    ๐Ÿšค Harbour80
    ๐Ÿ“ Guestbook100
    ๐Ÿ˜Š Avatar100
    86 Total Points
    United Kingdom
    Signature
    This user has not added a signature
    Recent Posts
    ๐Ÿ“ The Helen Barnet Gring - the things you find in skips
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    Hi, thanks for the offer. I suspect you mean the ones that Brown, Son and Ferguson in Glasgow have. I did wonder about getting them when I got hold of the boat originally but realistically I never needed to.

    Everything was more or less there when I got it - just knocked a bit flat. There are a number of photos of good static models of the ship about so I gust worked from them. The good thing about schooners is that there isnโ€™t that much string hanging about on the rigs really.

    Although mine is a sailing model most of the rigging as per full size is on it and working.
    These are some of the other pictures of models of the Gring and similar schooners that I used for reference when making repairs. The internet can be really useful sometimes.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ The Helen Barnet Gring - the things you find in skips
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    Hi,

    Thanks.

    Yes used tea and coffey before. The reason I use acrylics sometimes is that I need an exact match to other rigging nd I have sort of got into the habit.

    On a few of occasions over the years I have been asked to renovate very old statics for museums for display. You cannot and indeed shouldnโ€™t replace any more than you actually have to on things like that, you need to conserve as much of the original as possible.

    With acrylics I can play about with things until I get it exactly right. I also then have a small bottle of an exact colour match in store for if I need to do more work on the boat at another time. This I usually give to the museum with notes on things so that if anybody else does it they know where I was coming from.

    I do the same with wood stains. I have a stock of different wood water stains that I mix up to get exactly what I want. Again this is a trick I got from an Anteques restorer years ago.

    You use such small amounts usually that the โ€œsampleโ€ selection that I got from White friers in little bottles years ago is still in use. When I have needed more of any colour I get it by the big bottle and decant it as necessary.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: "Genie"
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Sometimes itโ€™s good to be old - at last, people with as long ago memories as me.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Building Jig
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    Hi,

    Thanks.

    Yes used tea and coffey before. The reason I use acrylics sometimes is that I need an exact match to other rigging nd I have sort of got into the habit.

    On a few of occasions over the years I have been asked to renovate very old statics for museums for display. You cannot and indeed shouldnโ€™t replace any more than you actually have to on things like that, you need to conserve as much of the original as possible.

    With acrylics I can play about with things until I get it exactly right. I also then have a small bottle of an exact colour match in store for if I need to do more work on the boat at another time. This I usually give to the museum with notes on things so that if anybody else does it they know where I was coming from.

    I do the same with wood stains. I have a stock of different wood water stains that I mix up to get exactly what I want. Again this is a trick I got from an Anteques restorer years ago.

    You use such small amounts usually that the โ€œsampleโ€ selection that I got from White friers in little bottles years ago is still in use. When I have needed more of any colour I get it by the big bottle and decant it as necessary.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ Sails sewing
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Really interesting presentation- I got a lot of ideas from it.
    Never thought of using silkspan in that way. Used to use it in preference to tissue on planes.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ The Helen Barnet Gring - the things you find in skips
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Going to do that, problem with me is my ability to find things on my big machine is not good. Itโ€™s a mac with a huge memory and my filing is not up to much. Itโ€™s in there somewhere with the rest of my stuff on the boat so it should surface eventually.

    The model itself is fairly straightforward, simple brain gear steering.

    What is interesting is the keel on the thing, which also doubles up as itโ€™s stand. The chap used a variation on the old Victorian bar keel. Itโ€™s actually quite effective if you want stability and not speed but I have never seen another like it. I am actually surprised itโ€™s not more common.

    I will post on it and take more pictures if necessary later tonight or tomorrow.

    Any thoughts on it when I do or if other people have seen anything like it would be much appreciated.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ The Helen Barnet Gring - the things you find in skips
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    The ship is in sailing condition now and somewhere on my main computer I have got pictures of her sailing at Eastern Park Lake in Norwich a couple of years ago. I actually use one of them as my background screen on my iPad but I donโ€™t know how to get it of the thing to simply post it as a picture.

    Most of the work that needed to be done was done when I got the boat and now itโ€™s just got a lot of old string giving up the ghost occasionally and falling to bits with age. I always try to be very conservative on any type of working restoration basically for two reasons.

    All the cordage on something old like this is linen or cotton thread. It changes colour with age, becomes brittle if it hasnโ€™t been waxed when first put on (because as a sailing model it keeps getting wet and over time degrades as an organic and eventually just disintegrates).

    Take a look at the hoops on the arft mast on the photo I originally posted. This ship sits on a book case in what my wife calls our โ€œlibraryโ€ area at the top of the stairs. I must pass it five times a day and I hadn't noticed that over the last year half the hoops had become detached and dropped down on the arft mast.

    Problem is when you try to replace any cordage it doesnโ€™t match colour wise. If you replace one little bit it stands out a mile. I do age things by running cordage through very very thinned down acrylic paint and then passing it through thumb and forefinger to squeeze most of it out. Let it dry and check for colour match. If it doesnโ€™t repeat until you get it right. Just use bits of cord and when you know itโ€™s a match do quite a bit of it as you will never get exactly the same results again and you know you will need more eventually.

    Second reason I am conservative is that itโ€™s not just the colour match - itโ€™s the cord twist and diameter. My wife complains of my constantly growing collection of spools of linen thread. If I see one going cheap I get it as eventually if I live long enough I will find a use for it.

    Waxing (bees wax) the thread really helps preserve it, just drag it over a block of the stuff before applying. Gets into the fibres, gives them a bit of protection and helps hold knots. I always fix the knot with tiny a dab of matt yatch varnish.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: "Genie"
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Just done a bit digging on Vic, Actually he was very prolific On the boat side indead
    http://modelenginenews.org/people/smeed.html
    ๐Ÿ”—
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: "Genie"
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Hi,

    Just seen this.

    Vick actually designed several boats which found there way into the MAP plans range as well as tons of aircraft. Most of his stuff was aimed at beginners and the less experienced modeller to get them going. He was very prolific.

    Most of his boats were small and free sailing though. I actually thought that the biggest thing he did was Gosling a hard chine R36 which I actually still have.

    I actually met him twice when I was his โ€œhandsโ€ on Blue Peter for BBC television in 1961 when he did a couple of chuck gliders for them.

    I still have my Blue Peter badge somewhere.

    Really a very nice kind man who I suppose was responsible for getting me hooked on model making of all kinds.

    First time I ever had any status For my skills at my comprehensive school in industrial Sheffield actually being on the telly.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    ๐Ÿ“ The Helen Barnet Gring - the things you find in skips
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    I will add to this thread as I get time over the next few days.
    First a bit of history on the ship.

    The HELEN BARNET GRING, was a four-masted coasting schooner built in 1919 by Robert L. Bean of Camden, Maine for the Boston, Massachusetts shipping firm of Crowell and Thurlow.
    Employed as a coasting schooner, the GRING sailed in the coastal and West Indies trade; generally carrying cargoes of stone, lumber, and coal. Captain Francis Bowker, who sailed aboard her said โ€œThe GRING was steady as a rock with a clean swept hold and could carry whole sail and topsails in a good, fresh breeze.โ€ She must have been a powerful vessel as she is forever immortalized by John F. Leavitt in his book Wake of the Coasters for causing the loss of the Schooner WILLIAM BOOTH. Leavitt mentions the 1928 tragedy; when โ€œthe three-masted WILLIAM BOOTH, stone laden, was cut down and sunk by the four-master HELEN BARNET GRING,โ€ three times in the course of his book.
    During her 21 year career the GRING sailed under 4 separate masters; James W. Howard, Clarence W. Holden, George Mohr, and Will Plummer. Captain Plummer, in addition to commanding the GRING, was also the owner, having purchased her in 1937.
    The Schoonerโ€™s career ended on Oct. 22, 1940 when the HELEN BARNET GRING was shipwrecked and lost off Cay Verde, Cuba .
    https://www.leagle.com/decision/193167748f2d6291464
    ๐Ÿ”—
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    5
    ๐Ÿ“ The Helen Barnet Gring - the things you find in skips
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    After a day in the greenhouse when it rained and wiring in grape vines to one of the gardens walls I have decided that itโ€™s time to stop fret-sawing out wooden gears for a clock I am making and have come to bed.

    As a newcomer looking at this site it really is interesting what you have got on it and what you can put up. It would be fair to say I am only semi literate with a computer so it does you credit that I can actually understand how to post things.

    My only real interest is actual sailing models with what I would suppose you would call โ€œcharacterโ€.

    Yes when asked I will tackle the odd restoration of an interesting static but basically I want it to go.

    I also have friends who think of me at odd moments and about three years ago I got a phone call from one of them who lives in Wales while walking his dog.

    โ€˜Dave, there is a chap just throwing a couple of model boats into a skip, one has four masts and the other is a bit over six feet long. Just sending photos to your phone, I thought you might want them?โ€

    Well the answer was obviously yes so three days later I made the 285 mile trip to Swansea in the back of another friends car and we all spent a happy night drinking the bottle of whisky I had taken down and the next day came back with an A class fibre glass yatch hull and most of a 47 inch long free sailing brain gear steered 4 masted American Coasting Schooner - it was being thrown away - really!!!

    I thought people might be interested and took this picture of it on the way up the stairs to bed, I will post more tomorrow if I get chance. It does actually sail; not fast but it looks very impressive when on the water. Itโ€™s also got quite a history behind it both as a model and a full size ship - i notice it also needs a bit of work doing on it again. I managed to keep most of the original rigging where I could but itโ€™s so old itโ€™s breaking up a bit.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    8
    ๐Ÿ“ Rebuilding an antique
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Agree with you on this, it may well be a representational model and not particularly accurate or represent a particular ship particularly accurately.

    Itโ€™s early morning and breakfast/garden/chickens/dogs/wife call but hopefully I can get back on things later this evening.

    Really glad I found you lot. Seams to be a nice friendly site with knowledgeable people on it.

    I tend to be a lone modeller and more of a doer and donโ€™t really get out to see people making things that much even out of lock down.

    Hope everyone has a good and productive day.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    3
    ๐Ÿ“ Rebuilding an antique
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Sorry, just realised itโ€™s not a bow chaser - itโ€™s a broken bowsprit thingy.

    My eyes are not very good this evening.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ Rebuilding an antique
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    If itโ€™s one of the Columbus ships, itโ€™s certainly that period it would be either the Niรฑa (Santa Clara), or the Pinta as they were caravela redonda rigged - which yours is.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ Rebuilding an antique
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Could I suggest that before you take anything of the ship - ever you take a couple of pictures of it in place and another one of it when you have taken it of.

    You will be surprised just how easy it is to forget what went where - especially if you are unused to the layout of the particular type of sailing boat you are working on if you are trying to restore something.

    What length is the thing? The reason I ask is that then you can work out the approximate scale so you can find out if itโ€™s possible to buy in things like blocks etc. You will need quite a lot of them and if itโ€™s a fairly big boat as I suspect it is itโ€™s not that difficult to make things - and itโ€™s a lot cheaper.

    Really like to see some more close up pictures -especially of the bow chaser canon - the one at the front. Also a picture of the back of the ship, windows and rudder. This sort of detail gives an idea of the quality and detail of construction.

    I suspect that when you bring this back from the dead you want it all to โ€œ blendโ€ so that basically it all looks as if it was built together and hasnโ€™t been repaired.

    Could look quite nice restored as an โ€œold โ€œ model.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    3
    ๐Ÿ“ Dumb Dingy refurbishment
    2 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    My eyes are gone for any detail work for this evening as I have been working in my garden all day and I have a problem if I am exposed to bright sunlight for long periods.

    Being reduced to watching Jurassic Park 3 is making me loose the will to live and as the family have voted that I must not play any more Wagner at the volume that I like to play it I thought people might be interested in something I was asked to have a go at for Felixtowe museum.

    We have a local menโ€™s shed group which I am nominally a member of and they use a room in the old fort which used to be part of the mine laying setup as a work shop. Itโ€™s part of the museum but basically only used as a store room for English Heritage stuff.

    We get to use it on the understanding that we repair things for them when they break etc.

    They have lots of โ€œstuffโ€ and dragged this out which probably hadn't been cleaned since the 1950s and really hadnโ€™t been looked after.

    Really nice model, very well made but with a few cracks and a lot of the hide glue joints parted. I suspect someone had tried cleaning it with vinegar.

    Yes vinegar is brilliant for cleaning old furniture, but it is also very good at crystallising hide glue (if you ever want to break a joint down). In this case with a model with little bitty joints - you clean it, you pick it up - and bingo - you have a newly part formed construction kit held together (only) with very small clenched pins.

    The thing had been so well made putting it back to rights and making good the joints only took about 12 hours and wasnโ€™t really a problem.

    I wish I had taken pictures before I started but people might like to see what it looked like cleaned up when I finished.

    I would really like to have met the chap that made it. Itโ€™s not actually a model, itโ€™s a miniature, made just as the full size boat would have been made - apart from the hide glue - which I replaced, with hide glue.

    I like the stuff for this sort of thing, if anything goes wrong or breaks you can clean it up and replace it literally without being able to see the repair. Most modern glues you cannot shift and they are a bugger to get of without leaving marks.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    12
    ๐Ÿ“ Which wood for steaming easily on a model?...
    3 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    I think spruce would be you easiest option if you cannot use a steam tube. You could use ammonia and soak the wood which will certainly do it but does leaks the wood brittle in my experience.

    The pictures are of my Wherry, not very good pictures I am afraid but I didnโ€™t really want to take it of the shell. Itโ€™s planks are a shade over 1/8 and oak, if I was doing it now I wouldnโ€™t use oak I would probably use pine or like you spruce.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    3 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    I tend to agree with you but I always said I would make one.

    Realistically it will be the only one. I keep coming back to it because I will just have to finish the thing but I have been at this one of and on for four years now, the wifeโ€™s idea really
    โ€œ why donโ€™t you make a real model boatโ€ she said. It is the one she always wants to show people.

    You will notice it has a propeller, not strictly scale but as I keep telling her, โ€œ you do know these things canโ€™t sail up wind donโ€™t you dear.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    ๐Ÿ“ Re: Which wood for steaming easily on a model?...
    3 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    Personally I would use beach or pine. If you make up a small proper steam tube and leave the wood in it for a bit you can bend most woods.

    As you are thinking of a Wherry hear is a picture of mine. Getting on a bit now and not been in the water for about 8 years but looks good and draws comments as I live in East Anglia.

    And the wood....... American oak!!!. Yes you can bend it in these sizes but I soaked it in a concoction that when wet makes the wood very very supple indeed, you can literally tie it in knots.

    When it dries out it looses all flexibility and becomes brittle itf you try to bend it but as you are clinker building it doesnโ€™t matter. Flood the joints and seems with thin cheap supper glue from Poundland, everything simply bonds together; which as you have removed all moisture and oils in the bending process the wood just absorbs the glue and it literally sets like rock producing basically a solid composite hull.

    But do it outside on a cool in a light breeze, the amount of cyanide coming of the glue just canโ€™t be good for anybody.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    3
    ๐Ÿ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    3 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    Hi Martin,

    Thanks for the comments.

    Yes you are partially right in your thoughts on the keel. Fin keels really didnโ€™t play a part in Victorian models which was when the Yawls started to be modelled. They just put a thumping great lump of lead on the bottom of the boats.

    Obviously the lower in the water you could get it the more efficient it was at keeping the boat upright in wind so keels became deeper - more drag though.

    This one is very deep , but another advantage of sticking a vertical plank to the whole of the bottom of the boat was/is that it tended to keep it on a straight course. No automatic or weighted rudders about or allowed in the early days or in the Southwold races of today.

    Southwold rules for these boats are more or less what the old Victorian racing rules were. Across the pond and back and a length handicap on release with races usually conducted on a fairly broad reach where possible.

    Regarding clinker builds some of the older Southwold models and virtually all the large Scottish sea model Yawls I have seen have been clinker built. Tends to grip the water better and keep a straighter course when free sailing - more drag but with larger heavy models it doesnโ€™t seem to matter as much.

    Should be an interesting build which I will probably. Post about.

    Regarding military ships its something I have never really made although I am making an R/C six Chanel something with a few guns on it at the moment.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share
    ๐Ÿ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    3 months ago by peewit ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    View All
    Well there are a few advantage to lock down.

    Some years ago I saw this hull up for sale on eBay for a very reasonable sum. It became much more reasonable when Royal Mail virtually destroyed it by dropping something very heavy on it before it got to me.

    I got it because at the time I was involved quite heavily in racing and as a builder in the Southwold model yatch regattas in Suffolk. One of the โ€œclassicโ€ classes up there is for Beach Yawls, they have been racing these since the late 1800โ€™s, they have a fascinating though little known history as racing models all up the east coast of england and right up into Scotland, free sailors of course and usually at least the older ones plank on frame. The most successful original model still racing and wining at Southwold in this class was โ€œRoaring 40sโ€ clinker built in the 1920โ€™s and 36โ€ long.

    My Yawl, White Lie a glass fibre copy of a boat called Black Joke which was built in 1921 for the Miss Judith Clark daughter of the then town Clark of Southwold and now in the Southwold museum at 29โ€ inches long could beat Roaring 40s in calm weather but usually lost to it in a good blow.

    This hull looked like it could have been made to do the job and now after piecing the hull back together I might get around to having a go.

    Itโ€™s a bit more symmetrical in hull form than usually seen in model beach Yawls in Southwold but the hull forms of both the full size boats and the models did change as you went up the coast to fit in with local waters. This form looks more like the sea going models that were raced on the Scottish Isles from rowing boats and I suppose could be a scaled down replica - the sea models went up to about 6โ€™ in length.

    The pictured hull came from Liverpool and I got it from a chap who was not a model we and new nothing about it.

    I am open to any suggestions as to what else it might be as a hull. I am not certain that it is a yawn and I would love to hear from anybody who has any knowledge, pictures, information on or actual models of racing Beach Yawls.

    First post on this site and I am not an expert on anything - I just like making things and am interested in the more unusual bits of model yatch history

    I am trying to upload pictures of the hull but am having difficulties with it - any help appreciated
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share


    About This Website
    Terms of Service
    Privacy Policy
    Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info