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    Clinker built sailing dinghy
    4 Posts Β· 8 Followers Β· 19 Photos Β· 51 Likes
    Began 17 days ago by
    Vice Admiral
    United Kingdom
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    Latest Post 5 days ago by
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    πŸ“ Planking
    5 days ago by πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Graham93 ( Vice Admiral)
    ✧ 22 Views · 10 Likes · 1 Comment
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    Before starting the planking, the location of the top edge of each plank was marked onto the edge of the bulkheads and forms. The edges of the three forms were also taped to avoid the risk of any of the planks sticking as the forms need to be removed once planking is complete.

    The planks are 2mm thick mahogany strips cut from some salvaged 25mm thick boards. They were cut over thickness and then sanded both sides using my homemade thickness sander.

    There are 24 planks required in total, 12 on each side. Each pair of planks (port and starboard) should be identical but are different from all the other 11 pairs. The plan includes full size templates for the planks so these were used to mark out the planks before cutting on the bandsaw. The ends of the planks need to have rebates planed along their edges (arrowed in photos 3 and 4) to overlap the previous plank. This gives a flush finish to the planking at the stem and transom.

    Once shaped, each plank is glued into position along it's length and clamped until the glue has set. It is difficult to shape and fit more than one plank a day as the glue needs to set before the clamps can be removed for use with the next plank.

    πŸ’¬ Re: Planking
    5 days ago by πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺ RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
    ✧ 20 Views · 5 Likes
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    Your usual 'Fantabuloso marquetry' work I see GrahamπŸ‘πŸ‘
    Pink mahogany, luv itπŸ˜‹πŸ˜
    Found several rough sawn boards of it, about 10'x6"x1/2", in the garage of a house I bought many many moons ago. (About 50x365πŸ€”). Made all sorts out of them, from book shelves to frames for pin boards. Comes up to a wonderful pink shine
    She is gonna look sooo bootiful when finished in your inimitably immaculate style.
    KUTGW
    Cheers, Doug😎
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    πŸ“ Formwork
    11 days ago by πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Graham93 ( Vice Admiral)
    ✧ 28 Views · 8 Likes
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    The hull is built inverted on a jig. There are four bulkheads which will form part of the completed hull, together with three temporary moulds which ensure that the planks are laid to the correct form.

    The bulkhead shapes were printed and then glued to 4mm birch ply before cutting out. The same approach was used for the moulds although these were cut from 12mm construction ply.

    The bulkheads and moulds all mount onto a timber strongback which was marked for cutting out using the scaled up dimensions from the plan.

    The strongback was then screwed to a flat board and the bulkheads and moulds were fixed in position. The front pair of bulkheads are bolted together using two threaded rods which run through holes in the strongback. A similar arrangement is used to hold the rear pair of bulkheads in position.

    Finally, the keel was fitted into the notches along the centreline of the bulkheads and moulds. It was glued to the bulkheads but not the three central moulds. Everything was checked for square before the glue dried. The complete assembly has turned out to be very rigid, which is probably going to be a good thing when it comes to fitting the planks.

    πŸ“ The Keel
    14 days ago by πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Graham93 ( Vice Admiral)
    ✧ 39 Views · 9 Likes · 2 Comments
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    The keel includes a keel box for a centreboard. I'm planning to make a fin and weighted bulb rather than use a centreboard but retained the box for appearance. I think it will be safer to have some weight down low to prevent the dinghy heeling over too far and shipping water. The fin will slide into the keel box and be held in place with retaining pins through the box.

    The keel is made from eight separate pieces. Patterns for each piece were printed on A4 sheets, glued to the timber blanks and then cut out. A full sized plan was then printed on 3 A4 overlapping sheets and used as a template for assembling pieces into a complete keel.
    The timber is oak, salvaged from an old tabletop with ply used for the keel box and the false rebates

    πŸ’¬ Re: The Keel
    14 days ago by πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Graham93 ( Vice Admiral)
    ✧ 37 Views · 2 Likes
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    Hi Ron,

    Yes, I should have mentioned that I sealed the inside faces of the box before gluing them together. I used varnish rather than fibreglass cloth
    πŸ’¬ Re: The Keel
    14 days ago by πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦ Ronald ( Admiral)
    ✧ 45 Views · 3 Likes
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    Be sure to use fibreglass cloth on your box parts before gluing them together.
    πŸ“ Clinker built sailing dinghy
    17 days ago by πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Graham93 ( Vice Admiral)
    ✧ 90 Views · 24 Likes · 9 Comments
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    A few years ago I saw a couple of Adamcraft sailing dinghys and was taken with the simplicity of their appearance on the water.

    More recently there was an article about Adamcraft in the Model Boats magazine (Sept 2023) which rekindled my interest.

    A search of the Sarik plans catalogue on-line came up with MM153, an 21" clinker built dinghy which looked similar to the Adamcraft model. A few days, and a few pounds later, the two sheet printed plan arrived. Studying the plan, I soon realised that what looks to be a simple boat when its completed, is far from simple when it comes to constructionπŸ€”. This wasn't helped by the fact that the plan was originally published in the Model Mechanic Magazine" July 1948. Some details are missing from the plan, no doubt covered in more detail in the magazine, but I couldn't find a back issue of that mag! However, I like a challenge!

    The first issue to resolve was the overall size. The plan is drawn at 1/8th scale giving an overall length of 21". I decided to scale it up to 1/6th scale giving an overall length of 28" (710mm) as I find small boats struggle a bit on choppy water. The larger size should give more stability while still being relatively easy to transport.

    Down to the local printshop who scanned the plan and provided me with two .jpg files. These I was able to rescale on my PC. Many of the enlarged parts, like the bulkheads will fit onto an A4 sheet so I was able to print those as templates using my inkjet printer. Other part outlines don't need to be printed full size as they can be marked out directly onto the timber using the dimensions on the plan (suitably scaled of course!). As the plan was drawn pre metrication the original dimensions are all imperial. I don't like trying to measure out 3 11/16" or 1 25/32" not to mention having to scale those dimensions from 1/8th scale to 1/6th so a few minutes (hours?) with a spreadsheet and I had the required measurements scaled and converted to metric equivalents. The metric dimensions were then added to the plan in red ink, before printing out working copies.

    Next, I'll finally be able to start cutting some timber! πŸ‘



    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    15 days ago by πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Graham93 ( Vice Admiral)
    ✧ 41 Views · 1 Like
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    Hi Ronald,

    Thanks for obtaining those photos and comments.

    The risk of sinking with the open cockpit is my biggest concern. I’m hoping that the larger scale, and a weighted fin will avoid that eventuality
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    15 days ago by πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦ Ronald ( Admiral)
    ✧ 50 Views · 8 Likes
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    I have been in touch with Peter Wallis from the UK who has built and sails the Adamcraft 18” sailing dingy in Frensham Pond.

    He wrote a email about his adventures including the sinking of the swamped open cockpit design. He says β€œI quickly came to the conclusion that trying to sail an open dinghy 18" overall length was never going to be a success . Almost immediately I recalled Sir Earnest Shackleton's dinghy the 'James Cairn' that he sailed some 800 miles in the Southern Antarctic that the ships carpenter had made and fitted a canopy to prevent them being swamped . An excellent idea and one that I thought would solve my problem.”

    Peter says, β€œ I made the canopy that is a snug fit around the coaming and have to say there have been no capsizes since.”

    He gave me permission to post these pictures of his model.

    Do any of you know Peter?
    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    16 days ago by πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Graham93 ( Vice Admiral)
    ✧ 59 Views · 3 Likes
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    Hi Ronald,

    The model I’m building is not the Adamcraft design. I don’t think there are commercially available plans for that. What I’m building is just very similar as it’s the closest plan I could find to what I’ve seen on the water ( I was at the event where that video was filmed).

    I’m sure you are right, it is going to take some time to adjust to sail well, if it ever does.
    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    16 days ago by πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦ Ronald ( Admiral)
    ✧ 67 Views · 5 Likes
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    I found a discussion about this model at model boat mayhem.

    Reading through the various posts, the original design is 18” but there is a 23” version out there too. One person commented that it took him a long time to get it to sail well, so be prepared to β€œlearn” how to sail it well.

    It appears from the video that more weight is required in the stern to bring the bow up, the dingy is sails with its bow down, isn’t there is a nautical term for this somewhere?

    Further reading discusses this sailing dingy is being built and sailed in various European sites. Maybe further research will turn up something interesting.
    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    16 days ago by πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ Commodore-H ( Midshipman)
    ✧ 71 Views · 3 Likes
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    Goes very well.
    They knew how to build 'em in '48..

    I will put this on my "to do" list
    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    16 days ago by πŸ‡«πŸ‡· stotty1111 ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
    ✧ 71 Views · 2 Likes
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    I alo have variant of this, produced from Model Boats plans, mine was produced to 1 : 4 scale, I have some photos somewhere which i will try to dig out later, I can't take any of the dinghy currently , it is buried at the club space - another story!
    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    17 days ago by πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦ Ronald ( Admiral)
    ✧ 81 Views · 6 Likes
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    I agree with making these larger. The video clip of these reminds me of the Footy class which at least for me was very finicky which is why I sold mine.

    My shortest sailboats are 24 & 25 inch. By the way, the stocky looking one on the work bench sails best using a DF65 mast and sail. It didn’t sail well with the gaff rig.
    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    17 days ago by πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ JohnH3 ( Recruit)
    ✧ 79 Views · 5 Likes
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    Perfect pond sailer. When you finish making copies i would like a set. Thanks John the weekend sailer.
    πŸ’¬ Re: Clinker built sailing dinghy
    17 days ago by πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ Black Shoe ( Midshipman)
    ✧ 89 Views · 5 Likes
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    A good size for some intricate detail!

    In my limited skill-set I've found that transferring measurements and particularly converting from one system to another provide me with too many opportunities to go adrift. If I'm working from a set of plans that are correct for the scale I'm using I seldom know (or care,) what the numerical dimension is. Using a pair of navigation dividers I lift the size of a given timber directly from the plan and transfer the points to the material without trying to read a ruler where (for me ) there's too much room for error.😊


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