|||
Current Website Support
87
Contributors
11
Subscribers
You are Not Registered
Donate for your silver medal πŸ…
Β£10
Β£15
Β£25
Β£50
Subscribe for your gold medal πŸ…
Β£1
Β£3
Β£5
Β£10
You Will Be Helping Towards:

  • Domain Fees
  • Security Certificates
  • iOS & Android App Fees
  • Website Hosting
  • Fast Servers
  • Data Backups
  • Upkeep & Maintenance
  • Administration Costs

    Without your support the website wouldn't be what it is today.

    Please consider donating towards these fees to help keep us afloat.

    Read more

    All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

    Many thanks for your kind support
  • Join Us On Social Media!
    Model Boats Website
    Model Boats Website
    Home
    Forum
    Build Blogs
    Media Gallery
    Boat Clubs & Lakes
    Events
    Boat Harbour
    How-To Articles
    Plans & Docs
    Useful Links
    2

















    Followers
    Possible racing beach yawl hull
    by peewit πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ ( Leading Seaman)
    πŸ“£










    Click To
    Follow
    6 Posts 5 Replies 3 Photos 1 Like
    ( Newest Posts Shown First )
    Westquay
    Commander
    πŸ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    Flag
    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 23 days ago
    😊 View Profile
    πŸ’¬ Send PM
    Fair point. My sailing will mainly be done on a canalised river (no flow) up the end of my road. No model boat clubs near enough to travel to. Only ponds are Sheringham and Norwich, both a day trip, so I'm expecting unhelpful winds on my local river (Well Creek). But, at least I can access both sides of the river thanks to a tiny bridge over it. There's also a slipway, so I can get safely to the water's edge. However, I couldn't bring my self to installing a motor in Vanity. Nothing a long pole can't sort out!

    Martin
    peewit
    Leading Seaman
    πŸ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    Flag
    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 5 days ago
    😊 View Profile
    πŸ’¬ Send PM
    I tend to agree with you but I always said I would make one.

    Realistically it will be the only one. I keep coming back to it because I will just have to finish the thing but I have been at this one of and on for four years now, the wife’s idea really
    β€œ why don’t you make a real model boat” she said. It is the one she always wants to show people.

    You will notice it has a propeller, not strictly scale but as I keep telling her, β€œ you do know these things can’t sail up wind don’t you dear.
    Westquay
    Commander
    πŸ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    Flag
    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 23 days ago
    😊 View Profile
    πŸ’¬ Send PM
    Never mind that old stick and string thing, make the Yawl. Much prettier, much nicer to sail, I'm sure. To me, galleons are like WW1 triplanes and Veteran cars...the old crocks of any given interest. Can't bear them! Gimme a vintage sports car or a racing 'plane from the golden era anytime. Although where bikes are concerned it's the 50s caff racer that blows my frock up. If you have to add, "if it'll even work", I really don't want to know!

    Martin
    1
    peewit
    Leading Seaman
    πŸ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    Flag
    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 5 days ago
    😊 View Profile
    πŸ’¬ Send PM
    Hi Martin,

    Thanks for the comments.

    Yes you are partially right in your thoughts on the keel. Fin keels really didn’t play a part in Victorian models which was when the Yawls started to be modelled. They just put a thumping great lump of lead on the bottom of the boats.

    Obviously the lower in the water you could get it the more efficient it was at keeping the boat upright in wind so keels became deeper - more drag though.

    This one is very deep , but another advantage of sticking a vertical plank to the whole of the bottom of the boat was/is that it tended to keep it on a straight course. No automatic or weighted rudders about or allowed in the early days or in the Southwold races of today.

    Southwold rules for these boats are more or less what the old Victorian racing rules were. Across the pond and back and a length handicap on release with races usually conducted on a fairly broad reach where possible.

    Regarding clinker builds some of the older Southwold models and virtually all the large Scottish sea model Yawls I have seen have been clinker built. Tends to grip the water better and keep a straighter course when free sailing - more drag but with larger heavy models it doesn’t seem to matter as much.

    Should be an interesting build which I will probably. Post about.

    Regarding military ships its something I have never really made although I am making an R/C six Chanel something with a few guns on it at the moment.
    Westquay
    Commander
    πŸ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    Flag
    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 23 days ago
    😊 View Profile
    πŸ’¬ Send PM
    A nice solid hull, peewit. I assume the heavy looking extended keel line is to save having an extra fin keel. I'm sure it should have been a clinker built hull to be a beach yawl. There was an article on Yarmouth Beach Yawls in an issue of Model maker and Model Boats magazine. I had it as a kid, but no longer, alas. But I remember it being a rather large, slightly tubby boat with many clinker strakes, but still a very nice shape, transom sterned.

    I'd simply build that hull up as a yawl anyway and see how she sails. If she needs more ballast, then add a blade or fin and a bulb.

    Good to see a non military sailing vessel being done.


    Martin
    peewit
    Leading Seaman
    πŸ“ Possible racing beach yawl hull
    Flag
    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 5 days ago
    😊 View Profile
    πŸ’¬ Send PM
    Well there are a few advantage to lock down.

    Some years ago I saw this hull up for sale on eBay for a very reasonable sum. It became much more reasonable when Royal Mail virtually destroyed it by dropping something very heavy on it before it got to me.

    I got it because at the time I was involved quite heavily in racing and as a builder in the Southwold model yatch regattas in Suffolk. One of the β€œclassic” classes up there is for Beach Yawls, they have been racing these since the late 1800’s, they have a fascinating though little known history as racing models all up the east coast of england and right up into Scotland, free sailors of course and usually at least the older ones plank on frame. The most successful original model still racing and wining at Southwold in this class was β€œRoaring 40s” clinker built in the 1920’s and 36” long.

    My Yawl, White Lie a glass fibre copy of a boat called Black Joke which was built in 1921 for the Miss Judith Clark daughter of the then town Clark of Southwold and now in the Southwold museum at 29” inches long could beat Roaring 40s in calm weather but usually lost to it in a good blow.

    This hull looked like it could have been made to do the job and now after piecing the hull back together I might get around to having a go.

    It’s a bit more symmetrical in hull form than usually seen in model beach Yawls in Southwold but the hull forms of both the full size boats and the models did change as you went up the coast to fit in with local waters. This form looks more like the sea going models that were raced on the Scottish Isles from rowing boats and I suppose could be a scaled down replica - the sea models went up to about 6’ in length.

    The pictured hull came from Liverpool and I got it from a chap who was not a model we and new nothing about it.

    I am open to any suggestions as to what else it might be as a hull. I am not certain that it is a yawn and I would love to hear from anybody who has any knowledge, pictures, information on or actual models of racing Beach Yawls.

    First post on this site and I am not an expert on anything - I just like making things and am interested in the more unusual bits of model yatch history

    I am trying to upload pictures of the hull but am having difficulties with it - any help appreciated



    About This Website
    Terms of Service
    Privacy Policy
    Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info