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    DUTCH AUXILIARY
    by mistyoptic πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ ( Midshipman)
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    πŸ“ Dutch Auxiliary
    15 hours ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    Moving On
    With all the bulkheads firmly attached to the keel the upper and lower stringers were attached.

    This is a flat bottomed hull and I have decided to plank this directly onto the frames. I have acquired some old slats from a wooden blind which have given me the material to create planks for the bottom of the hull. They have a finish on them which has been removed by belt sander on the side to be glued, and they have been affixed to the frames to form a very solid hull bottom. I have a feeling that this model is going to be something of an apprentices exam piece as I am using a few different techniques in the hull construction. The sides will be .8mm ply with mahogany veneer thickness planking and the bow section is balsa blocks. The deck will be planked with the same material as the hull bottom.

    With bottom successfully planked the next building step would be to add the ply sides, but before I do this want to make sure that the gear will fit into the hull satisfactorily.
    For the motor I have chosen a small 280 motor with a short shaft which is sold as replacement for the power units in the Crocodile Heads. From Banggood these were minimal cost and a suitable prop was bought from the same source, as was the 10 amp ESC.

    I wanted to mount the motor as neatly in the boat as possible and have opted for it to be in the well area and be covered with a mahogany casing. I have opted for a rubber band drive which works well in my Mantua Mincio, and allows the motor to be mounted below the shaft. Using an 8mm pulley on the motor and 12mm on the shaft, giving a 1.5 reduction.

    I considered various winching arrangements such as a standard servo with an extended arm which would give only a short travel for the main boom. A standard arm winch would not have sufficient room within the hull to move. Finally I have purchased a two turn standard servo size winch from Howes models for Β£9.99 which will give me adequate control over the main boom. It will be mounted at deck level with the winch drum inside the cabin. This allows the battery, a 1600 5 cell Mnih to sit under the winch in the bottom of the hull. This can stay in place and be charged as required.
    The Rx will be mounted on the first bulkhead by Velcro and will be accessed by a hatch in the deck, The ESC will be between bulkheads 2 and 3.

    A mini servo will be fixed to the transom for the rudder control. See all pics.
    I have loosely rigged this all up and it works quite satisfactorily.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Dutch Auxiliary
    3 hours ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Geoff,
    You say that the rubber band works well on your Mantua Mincio, but i would think it would bunch up and release in operation.
    Have you thought about using a large thin 'O' Ring ?

    Keep up the good work.

    Martin555.
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    πŸ“ DUTCH AUXILLIARY
    9 days ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    The next steps

    The bulkheads were notched for the stringers and keel and all dry fitted to ensure a good fit, but before they could be fixed to the keel it would be best to fit the propshaft through the keel. The bottom stringers had been fixed to the keel and it was considered that to just drill a hole for the 5mm o/s propshaft would be all that was required. But, alas, this all went wrong and the keel was ruined and it was never going to hold together again, with just the small section of the keel behind shaft somewhat adrift.

    So I had to take a different tack, I cut a new keel and was able to salvage the fin from the first and fit it satisfactorily to the new keel. On consideration as to what to do next I fitted one side of the lower stringer to the keel with a doubler on the same side. Turned the keel over and sawed the slot for the shaft in the keel. This left the keel intact on the stringer and doubler, and then the stringer and doubler on the other side were added. This worked well and I could proceed.

    The bulkheads were fitted and epoxied to the keel, two or three at a time to get them lined up. To get the angle of the transom to the keel, a piece of balsa was superglued to the end angle of the keel and the transom clamped to this.

    I have included a pic of gloves that I use to aid grip when using a knife or fretsaw or Proxxon circular saw. They offer a bit of protection against slippages and also allow a firmer grip on the workpiece when sawing, especially the fretsaw. They are quite comfortable to wear and are available for around Β£1 at discount outlets and builders merchants.

    I must say that this model is occupying a lot of my thought as to how it will all fit together with the radio gear and the rigging and running rigging. I want to preserve the open well at the back with its seats but the top of the propsahft will protrude into this space with the motor as well. The cabin I will probably make as detachable to give as much access to the 'hold' as possible for fitting and servicing the equipment, but more of that later.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILLIARY
    8 days ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    Thanks for comment Martin, yes it is a steep angle on p/s, it is a short shaft and I wanted to get the inboard end above w/line. If I had used a longer shaft it would have taken the motor into the area reserved for the sail winch and battery. I considered the angle, but after all in a model of this type, forward thrust need not be at full potential. Regards Geoff.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILLIARY
    8 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Geoff.
    You are doing great job,
    I don't know if it is the camera angle or just me but the angle of the prop shaft looks a little steep.

    Martin555.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILLIARY
    8 days ago by Newby7 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Geoff looks like the gloves are off for this build LOL Well done.
    Rick
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    9 days ago by Seanympth ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    She looks a beautiful construction, the wood grain look's the part. Thank you for sharing your thought process and the problems.
    I am enjoying the build.
    Best wishes TreveπŸ‘
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    πŸ“ DUTCH AUXILIARY
    18 days ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    Getting Under Way
    With these thoughts, I set about the build. First the keel. This would not have a detachable portion, bolted on as per plan but a hardwood fin keel jointed into the main keel and glued, (epoxied) into position, similarly the stem was half jointed as the plan but glued in place without the screws! The keel was then notched at the bulkhead stations as shown on the plan.

    In the past I have bought bundles of hardwoods from Hobby Craft and this furnished me with some dark wood from which I have been able to construct the keel fin. The two pieces were joined vertically to give the required width and a third piece horizontally across the bottom to cover the exposed end grain in the verticals.

    As a means of getting a start I made the rudder and tiller. In the past I have bought bundles of hardwoods in packs from Hobby Craft and this furnished me with some thin dark wood. I cut two pieces to outline of the rudder and laminated them with a piece of .8mm ply as the core. This I consider will keep the component free from warps and an offcut from this was used for the tiller arm. As a decorative function I have reinforced the join with two brass pins.

    In pursuit of Doug’s passion for people in boats I am figuring on having a little man sitting on the seat in the well with his hand on the tiller, his arm moving with it! There are so many possibilities with this model. Again, from within the site, Nerys has suggested that the boat be gaff rigged so this will happen, I expect. So much encouragement and ideas from members, thank you all.

    The bulkhead patterns were derived from scanning the half forms from the plan, printing two copies, cutting each half shape out and pasting them, mirror image, onto a piece of cereal packet. (I remember someone else saying on the site, never throw away a cereal packet, more good advice!)

    These were then cut out carefully and pinned to the ply and drawn around, Then cut out by my trusty Draper Scroll Saw.
    This is just the starting point, with the bulkheads in outline only so far, they have to be notched for the stringers and also to cross halve with the notches in the keel and the centre portions cut away. Fitting the RC gear and motor /propshaft is going to be challenging in a model of this size. This could almost be a prototype as little detailed information is given on the plan.
    I would hate to try to start a Mills .75 in this model. Thankfully we have modern batteries and motors now.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    18 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Off to a flying start Geoff.
    I am already looking forward to the next update.

    Martin555.
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    πŸ“ DUTCH AUXILIARY
    26 days ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    DUTCH AUXILLIARY.

    This build blog been brought about by chance and is project which fulfils a leaning toward nostalgia in a few ways. My last build had come to an end and had proved successful on the water, and I thought that building had ceased, as we humans would be released into the wild again, perhaps building would take a back seat during the summer months.

    But on reviewing some of the folders in my workshop I came upon a couple of plans that I had bought two or three decades ago intending to build them one day. One was a MAP plan of Tornado, a small high speed launch and the second, which is to be the subject of this build blog, β€˜Dutch Auxiliary’. I remember gazing at both these models in the MAP Plans handbook of the day in the 1950's.

    The nostalgia kicked in and I decided I must build it. Designed for Model Maker in the spring of 1952 the construction shows all of the ideas of previous eras. When I was about 11 or 12 my elder brother, some ten years senior, bought me a book for Christmas, around the time this plan would have been published, Model Boat Building, sixth edition 1948, by F J Camm.

    As an impressionable youngster I gathered that, whoever he was, F J Camm must be the fount of all wisdom as he edited all the β€˜Pratical’ magazines of the day , be it Wireless, Television, Motorist, Householder and so on.

    The design of Dutch Auxiliary follows many of the ideas shown in this book and the idea that the model should be sturdy is reflected in the use of 3/16 ply formers set at 2 inches apart in a 16 inch hull which seems a bit hefty. The junction of the stem to the keel using cross halving joint and screws seems to show how jointing then did not have the advantage of our modern adhesives. In fact I did wonder if the designer had recently retired from building Henry 8ths Fleet of warships and did I ought to go out and buy and adze!

    The final bit of nostalgia came from the fact that on my first holiday from work in 1979 I enjoyed a week on the Norfolk Broads with a teenage mate in Whippet 11, a small two berth yacht fitted with a British Seagull outboard and this design bears a similarity to that boat. (1930's Whippet - Broads Cruiser Renovation By Chris - Boat Renovation People (boat-renovation.com)

    The plan has not a great deal of detail, the bulkhead lines are shown in half section with a side view of the keel and plan view of the deck and lines, with step by step drawings of the assembly. It was to be skinned with 1/16 ply on the hull, deck and cabin top. A plain dowel for the mast and just an outline for the sailplan and simple rigging to hold up the mast, set in a brass ferrule attached to the keel. The auxiliary can be either a small diesel engine, electric or clockwork.

    In this relatively simple design I can see the chance to make a small model yacht which has a degree of class, if built using dark natural hardwoods, with a tapered wooden mast, hardwood booms and bowsprit. The hull can be skinned with a thinner grade of ply, say .8mm, and then planked with a similar thickness of mahogany. The cabin again would be dark hardwood as would be the seats in the well. The deck could be planked with a light wood.

    The power unit, with not a clockwork clock in the house and having sold my small diesels 50 years ago, would have to be an electric motor. The pics show a bit of an overview of the Plan and building will commence with next blog.

    Geoff
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    23 days ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    Nerys, Thank you for your prompt reply, and the information there in.
    I have since found a sail plan from a schouw and this will give me some exact dimensions to work to, scaled to the size of my boat. Thanks for the information about the loose jib, it was concerning me that in a boat of this size, to have to control both sails from one servo would be tricky. In the past I have sailed Marbleheads and R36r in competition and have dismissed the idea that,, in this boat, a full 90 degree sail sweep is not going to be possible nor even desirable. So a small sail movement will be adequate and, of course, with the auxiliary engine I will be able to get out of trouble!

    The amount of thought that this model is provoking is mind-blowing!

    Best wishes Geoff.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    24 days ago by Nerys ( Admiral)
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    Hi Geoff,I think that picture would be a very good one to follow in your build. If you look in 'My Harbour' you will see that I scratchbuilt a Dutch schouw yacht some months ago with a similar rig. She sailed very well and I was more than pleased with her. Both main and staysail are loose footed. I cut the mainsail with the curved head to fit the curved gaff which I had previously carved. The mainsail was tight laced to the gaff, in fact, sewn on. The luff of the mainsail can be either loosely laced to the mast or, as I did, laced to mast rings, which I found amongst the jewellery findings in a craft shop. The foot of the mainsail is just fastened to each end of the boom, that gives a nice curved flow to the sail. The staysail is held to the forestay again with small metal rings, about 5mm diameter, from a craft shop. I use them on jibs and staysails on any sailing craft (mainly Thames Barges) I build. The jib is loose footed and is sheeted with a loop of string loosely going from one side of the boat to the other left loose enough for the foot of the jib to have enough flow to be following the curve of the bow. The clew of the sail has a small ring on it and runs free on the sheet. The jib, or staysail, is thus self activating and does not need a servo.

    I hope that answers your queries, but if there is anything else, or I'm not clear enough, please let me know. I'm only too pleased to help.

    Best of luck, I look forward to updates on your build.

    Nerys
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    24 days ago by Newby7 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Looks to be a wonderful next project.Good luck with the build.
    Rick
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    24 days ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    Nerys, Thank you for your idea and I have found this pic on the net which I think may be an example of what you are speaking of. It would certainly give me the idea of what is required and I wonder if you would kindly comment on these items for me.

    1 It looks as though both sails are loose footed.
    2. The main is laced quite loosely to the mast.
    3. The main looks a though it is quite closely attached to the curved jib, how would this have been fixed.
    4. I think I could well use this as a pattern to follow your idea.

    Many thanks Geoff.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    25 days ago by Seanympth ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Geoff,
    Thank you for sharing your next project, I love the introduction, the plan looks challenging and I am looking forward to following the build.
    It's a lovely project.

    Best wishes
    Treve
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    25 days ago by mistyoptic ( Midshipman)
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    Thank you for this thought, Nerys, the idea is good and takes the build further away from the simple model boat idea, will begin my research.

    Best wishes
    Geoff
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    25 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Geoff,
    A blast from the past.

    As you say with modern materials and glues she will be lighter.
    And add your skills to the build and she will be a great sailing boat by the time she is finished.

    Good luck with the build.
    I will be following.

    Martin555.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: DUTCH AUXILIARY
    25 days ago by Nerys ( Admiral)
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    What a nice little boat, certainly looks to have some Dutch influence with that high sheer towards the bow. If she was mine I'd give her a typical Dutch rig with a short curved gaff. Please build her and show us progress in a blog. she's the sort of boat that really appeals to me.

    Cheers, Nerys
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