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    Fast attack craft
    by Martin555 πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ ( Captain)
    πŸ“£










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    52 Posts 51 Replies 16 Photos 74 Likes
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    Martin555
    Captain
    πŸ“ Fast attack craft
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    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 2 hours ago
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    Hi Jb,
    Yes I agree that you require a certain amount of knowledge about the equipment that you use and the health and safety side of things.
    The point I was trying to say is that if you hear all the bad things about batteries exploding/smoking then nine times out of ten it is not suitable for the job or someone trying a short cut to charging.
    I have heard many stories of this happening but someone new to this hobby will think that it is to dangerous and look for a different hobby.
    I think that the important thing to get across is using the equipment properly rather than going in to the in' and out's of the very technical descriptions of various bits and pieces.

    I am probably not making it any clearer what I am trying to say.

    Martin555.
    If it looks right it probably is.
    Nerys
    Sub-Lieutenant
    πŸ“ Fast attack craft
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    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 17 minutes ago
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    Not quite the same thing but definitely batteries. My partner, Alice was given an electric bicycle at the weekend and was told the battery had 'had it'. She worked on it for a few hours, luckily, knowing what she was doing and was able to go for a ride on it yesterday afternoon.

    Nerys
    2
    When the winds before the rain, soon you may make sail again, but when the rain's before the wind, tops'l sheets and halyards mind
    jbkiwi
    Commander
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    Country: πŸ‡³πŸ‡Ώ New Zealand
    Online: 3 hours ago
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    Re - It is good to have all this information on the different batteries,
    Hi Martin, I think what we are trying to say is that all battery types are good as long as you maintain them properly and they are suitable for the job they are doing. Batteries are getting better and safer every day and the choices increasing as well so it can be confusing for beginners in the R/C hobbies.
    Unfortunately you do need to be aware of the technical stuff re -use and charging, as all battery packs can be dangerous (ie, try shorting a big NiCad or NiMh pack and see if the smoke doesn't leak out and melt your fingers!) They can cause fires too but people seem stuck on the LiPo 'dangers' and forget about those 'safe' batteries.
    The good thing is that people can google anything these days and can usually check for instructions or possible problems before buying any product, model or otherwise.
    JB
    1
    Martin555
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    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
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    Hi Guys,
    It is good to have all this information on the different batteries, but I like many of us use what ever is recommended to us and probably don't look after them as well as we should do.
    I have had batteries that have lasted many many years and some that have lasted only months.
    It is really good to have members on this site that know the technical stuff and that you can ask questions about it and will get the proper answers.

    I feel that we tend to go a bit overboard with the technical stuff and I am sure that if new guys start reading all of this then they might steer away from this hobby.

    It is so easy to get bogged down with the technological advantages of this type or that type, but at the end of the day we just want to enjoy the making of a nice boat and the pleasure of seeing all your hard work finally going through it's paces.
    That to me is what this hobby is all about.

    Martin555.
    1
    If it looks right it probably is.
    DodgyGeezer
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    "....Usually you post useable info, but in this case I have to vehemently disagree!
    And I would like to put the record straight before you lead our novice members to potential disaster, or at least an expensive disappointment!..."

    Well, this certainly stirred something up! And I can't see why? Perhaps RN has shares in a Lipo factory? πŸ˜‰

    All that I have said is standard knowledge on the subject. NiMH ARE more robust than LiPos - I can't see how anyone can disagree with that. They are more forgiving of overcharge and over-depletion. I have not said that Lipos should not be used - I use them myself - but I have stated a preference for NiMH where the benefits of Lipos are not a requirement.

    I have been using NiMH for around 15 years, and Lipos for about the same time. During that period I must have bought around 2 dozen packs of each type. I currently have one working LiPo pack, while all my NiMH packs work, albeit sometimes with less charge than originally. The Lipos have gone unbalanced, swollen, delaminated or punctured at some point.

    Lipos, when working, are phenomenal items, and make miniature flying models possible. I use them for this, and would, as I have said, use them when light weight and high power are essential. But they do require that you look after them and follow the rules - in particular, not over-discharging them. If you do not treat them properly they will certainly swell and fail - I cannot see why stating this is considered scaremongering? It is this lack of robustness that makes me prefer NiMH, since I do not take particular care of my batteries. NiMH will put up with this - Lipo won't. That is the gist of what I said, it is attested by other comments on this thread which stress that you must 'follow the rules' and I can't see how stating it will lead novice members to potential disaster or expensive disappointment? I would have thought the opposite...

    Incidentally, your comments about the differences between Lipos and Nimh seem to cover all the good points of Lipos and the bad points of NiMH. It would be more useful to novices to see a better balanced description. For instance, recent advances in NiMH batteries have produced low self-discharge batteries - (quoting the wiki)

    "In October 2011 the batteries were again improved to retain up to 90% of their capacity after one year, 80% after three years and 70% after five years."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eneloop

    These are readily available, I have used these in emergency flashlights and can confirm that they do do 'what it says on the tin' (though I haven't had time to try out the five year claim yet!). They can be of use if your modelling practices include going to the lake at short notice.

    I hope this isn't going to develop into a flame war. As I said, I can't see why noting a preference for the robustness of NiMH should engender such a response...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eneloop
    πŸ”—
    1
    Martin555
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    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
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    Hi Guys,
    Thank you for your comments I appreciate them.
    The main reason I say that she need to be bigger than the prototype is at this size she will Bob about like a cork.
    If she was made bigger then she will cope with the waves much better.

    As for the plans well that part is still a work in progress as I need help from DodgyGeezer.
    I have made sketches with measurements and instructions but I am no good at drawing up plans.

    Martin555.
    2
    If it looks right it probably is.
    jbkiwi
    Commander
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    RE "I would use brushless, but avoid Lipos in less there was a good reason for them.
    Quite true Doug, I still have the first Zippy Flightmax 5s 20c LiPo I bought (02.06.2010) and it still balances after all this time, (just pulled it out of the archive and it's reading 3.92-3.91- 3.92-3.90.3.92 in storage mode) Doesn't have much guts any more but is perfectly usable in a boat. I have a few newer 4s 40c discharge batteries which have puffed/gassed, but are still usable with care ( don't suck more than 40A for too long, cool them straight away - always have an Esky with bagged ice handy if running batteries at high drain and getting them hot)
    At home and you're testing, if they get quite hot, just put them in the fridge to cool down. I have even forgotten and frozen them solid in the freezer, (takes a while to get power back while they warm up,- bit like frozen frogs!) If you have any that puff badly or get very hot constantly for no reason, ditch them.
    Safest way to do this is to make up a bucket of very salty water outside and drop the battery in to discharge it (you will see the leads bubbling,) next day, (if all activity has stopped), take it out in the middle of the garden (making sure the wind is blowing towards open space- Not your neighbors just in case as if it does smoke,- it's nasty stuff!) and ram a large garden fork or 4"nail right through it to make sure all the charge has gone and it's safe to dispose of (I still leave them outside in a tin for a few months just to be extra sure)
    Do Not Do This Without Discharging In The Bucket First !!! as once they start you can't put them out, as it's a chemical reaction, and you will have so much nasty smoke you won't believe it !!!), not to mention a few thousand degrees of heat and flames!.
    Now go out and buy a new battery and look after it properly ie, using correct charging, discharging and storage charging, and it should last for years, - especially in boats, as unless used in racing boats, the discharge for the average brushed/ brushless scale boat is nothing compared to planes.
    JB
    2
    RNinMunich
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    πŸ“ Fast attack craft
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    Country: πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺ Germany
    Online: 15 hours ago
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    Agreed NerysπŸ‘
    Would be more imposing and offer more possibilities for special effects!
    But then, the plans (if there are any!?) can always be scaled up?
    😎
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    Young at heart - slightly older in other places πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug
    Nerys
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    Country: πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ United Kingdom
    Online: 17 minutes ago
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    Is there any reason why this boat could not be built bigger? She looks great but would be equally or even more, attractive if 50% bigger.
    2
    When the winds before the rain, soon you may make sail again, but when the rain's before the wind, tops'l sheets and halyards mind
    RNinMunich
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    πŸ“ Fast attack craft
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    Country: πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺ Germany
    Online: 15 hours ago
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    Hi Martin,
    "It will need to be bigger for RC."
    Actually I don't think so.
    There are so many mini, micro, pico, RC components available these days, look at the Deltang RXs etc for model railways for example!
    http://www.micronradiocontrol.co.uk/
    I managed to squish two 385 motors into a sub hull WTC only 5.7cm (2.25") wide.
    Electronics, except ESC (visible next to the battery forward of the engine room), into a similar, but tapered, compartment in the bow.
    So motorisation and RC must be possible with your boat with 4.25" beam.
    But in your case, as you say you have no possibility to get to a sailing pond😭, I s'pose static models is the only solution ☹️ But can also be a source of satisfactionπŸ‘πŸ˜Š
    Cheers, Doug 😎
    http://www.micronradiocontrol.co.uk/
    πŸ”—
    2
    Young at heart - slightly older in other places πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug
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