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    Vintage Model Works Thames Police Launch by M Turpin
    by mturpin013 πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ ( Rear Admiral)
    πŸ“£










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    51 Posts 289 Comments 0 Photos 414 Likes
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    πŸ“ THE END
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    I have finally finished all the additional bits and pieces which Looking at the model boat which is in the National Maritime Museum it has a number of β€œadornments” which I think I will model and make part of my project they include
    1. Wooden frame work
    2. Anchor
    3. Anchor rope
    4. Bow fender
    5. Bilge pump
    6. Brass Air duct vents
    These have all been done now apart from the bow fender which my wife is knitting as I type
    So a final set of pictures to show the maiden voyage, a project that has been a pleasure throughout, it’s a kit that I would recommend to anyone as a first build or for a more experienced modeller to enhance the basic model as they please
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    πŸ’¬ Re: THE END
    24 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Mike,
    I very nearly missed this.

    Great videos and another fantastic masterpiece.
    The battle with the dashboard finally payed off.
    Your build log was a real pleasure to read.
    Thank you.

    I am already looking forward to your next project.

    Martin555.
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    πŸ‘€ 22 Views
    πŸ’¬ Re: THE END
    25 days ago by ian j ( Recruit)
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    Hi Michael, seeing the launch on the lake was brilliant to look at, it ran extremely well and it certainly appears to move fast.
    Another very nice model.
    Kind regards
    IanπŸ‘
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    πŸ’¬ Re: THE END
    2 months ago by Nerys ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Great looking boat, videos were good to. How lucky the club is to have an owner who actually encourages the model boat club and even allows them to build a clubhouse.

    Nerys
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    πŸ’¬ Re: THE END
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Thanks for those comments, Its been a satisfying build.
    The Pond is a private fishing lake which is also part of a touring caravan site, the owner kindly lets the York Model Boat Club use the lake as and when we want. The club has built a club house with all the facilities you need for a days sailing, great place.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: THE END
    2 months ago by stevedownunder ( Lieutenant)
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    Great shots and video Mike,
    Very nice performance. πŸ‘

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ‘€ 58 Views
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    πŸ’¬ Re: THE END
    2 months ago by jbkiwi ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Nice job Mike, you'll be happy with that I'm sure, runs very nicely. Any vids of the fireboat coming up? Nice pond by the way.

    JB
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    πŸ’¬ Re: THE END
    2 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    A fine looking model Mike, congratulations on another successful build.
    Rob.
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    πŸ“ New design dash panel
    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Work has been slow recently I've been working on those bits that seem to take an age to finish plus I've been working on a new test tank (pics to come when finished) plus repairing RC cars for my grandson who seems to be able to hit the only post in the middle of a field.

    So the new securing device now has two independent rails POS + & NEG-- and each is fastened through the top panel using 10 BA nuts on the back these then have tags which go to a socket.

    The led backs have been removed and a 1206 pre-soldered Micro Litz Warm White LED is stuck in place using a dad of cyno, the positive and negative leads are then soldered to the rail tags. Next job is to secure the leds that will illuminate the five dials; these are positioned and secured with a piece of tape whilst the dab of canopy glue sets.
    Again the leads are soldered to the appropriate electrical tag.

    The next challenge was to remodel the dials which are to be printed on photographic paper to eliminate any grain in the paper the overlay is then encapsulated in a matt plastic heat applied pouch. Next the profile is cut out and the holes punched for the leds and the steering wheel shaft. The now finished paper overlay is now put through a thermal encapsulation unit (laminator)using a matt finish cover, I now have to cut out the profile and using some double sided tape I attach the overlay to the aluminium unit. Next test it works.
    Yes it does, the holes are in the right places and the outer profile lines up correctly I have made a few copies of this as there is potential for damage as it is been pushed back and forth with the steering wheel switch and could get wet!
    The photo of the finished dials isn’t very good but in reality it looks perfect and I think overall the work that I’ve put into this little item has been worth it.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi Pete, yes there is a resister in the circuit, it runs on 6Volts but since I wanted the brightness to be reduced so I used a resister with a value :-
    Yellow 4 purple 7 Brown 10 gold +/- 5%
    this single supply runs all the LEDS on the dash
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    3 months ago by ToraDog ( Midshipman)
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    Beautiful!
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    πŸ‘€ 80 Views
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    3 months ago by stevedownunder ( Lieutenant)
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    That is one heck of a dash, beautiful work Mike.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    3 months ago by Rookysailor ( Commodore)
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    Lovely work Mike, can I ask, did you need to use any resistors on the lights on the dials? if so what value.

    Cheers, Pete😊
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    3 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Terrific work Mike, you've nailed it!
    I admire your skills and persistence and the end result was certainly worth all the effort.
    Rob.
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    πŸ“ New design dash panel
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Some would say β€œhave you nothing better to do” but I enjoy my modelling what else can I say.
    The new panel is made from a new aluminium front and then a black Perspex back, the reason is that in the original design the slide rails were fastened to the front plate making electrical contact with each other, so the Perspex backing plate will allow me to mount the slide rails in the Perspex so that they are electrically insulated.
    I have used the square tubing again having the larger tube glued in the top holes, this piece also has two contacts silver soldered to each one, silver soldered because I will be soft soldering all the led wires to this piece.
    The Leds are also an issue because of the different voltages required for the Red 1.8v, Green 3.2v, Blue 3.2 and white3.2, there isn’t a voltage that will correctly illuminate all Leds, you may think use resisters , but the whole idea of this unit is that its self-contained and there isn’t really enough room for a resister. The other consideration having tried loads of resisters to get the correct illumination taking the voltage tolerances into account was proving difficult.
    Solution – I will cut the back off the red, green and blue Leds and glue them into the holes, then they will be lit by the same Led type as all the dial openings meaning I only need the overall power supply to be correct for one type of Led which is 1206 Pre-soldered Micro Litz Warm White.
    The Leds are very delicate so the method of fastening in position will have to be cyno or canopy glue (test required) and then the wires need trimming to length and the insulation stripping which is to say the least a challenge, with the wires been so small I’ve trialled stripping with a my wire strippers and managed to set them to strip rather than cut although it’s not an exact science. More to come about the wiring later.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Thanks for all the really helpful comments, It isn't obvious from the pictures but the last picture shows the common contacts for pos and neg which will be mounted in the black Perspex at the top of each rail thereby transmitting a path through each rail from each Led to the 8BA studs which are mounted in the wood facia and then to the battery.
    More detail to come
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    5 months ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Mike,
    I do like the idea of using the different colour plastic from the LED's and back lighting them with just the worm white LED.

    Martin555.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    5 months ago by jbkiwi ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Mike, if you can use very small silicone shielding wire (like servo extension wire with one stripped off) there should be enough flexibility to not hinder the movement. Are you intending running all the lights at once,? I would suggest using larger LEDs and running them from small cheap voltage regulators as Stephen mentioned, (you would only need 1 and a resistor for the red LED lead. You can power the VReg from a 1s LiPo or similar, or you might be able to run a loop from your main switch to the VReg, (input voltage depending) so when you power on, your dash lights will come on, or use a remote switch.

    You can have these anywhere in the boat as they are only about 50x 20x10mm) You would only need 4 wires going to the dash (link all the LEDs Except red) as a circuit on your dash then to your 2 power in wires + and -) The pos and neg wire for your red LED can go back on their own to your resistor with your VReg . You can then adjust the voltage/brightness of them all from your VReg.

    Someone might be able to improve on that? Just an idea.πŸ˜€

    If you want to switch them individually, then you might have to look at Arduino controllers?

    JB
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    5 months ago by jbkiwi ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Re- In my humble opinion 2 voltage regulators remotely mounted could supply the required 1.8 and 3.2 volts, just a thought.

    That's all I use for my LEDs Stephen, just the $2 ones from AliExpr. You can adjust the LEDs for suitable brightness, no need for resistors everywhere. I use them for water/air pumps, LEDs, anywhere you need to adjust small voltages. Actually just ordered a bunch more recently,- very handy !

    JB
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    5 months ago by stevedownunder ( Lieutenant)
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    Beautiful work Mike,

    I wouldn't worry about the "some people say" you are doing something that you enjoy along with using your mind and keeping busy, bravo to you.

    Funny how these jobs can snowball.

    In my humble opinion 2 voltage regulators remotely mounted could supply the required 1.8 and 3.2 volts, just a thought.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    5 months ago by Newby7 ( Vice Admiral)
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    Wonderful work you do Mike . Your skill sets are above and beyond. How do you work with such small items and get them to work.
    Rick
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    πŸ’¬ Re: New design dash panel
    5 months ago by Skydive130 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Mike, you elec-trickery blows my mind! Awesome stuff πŸ‘
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    πŸ“ Instrument panel
    6 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    The last post detailing the dash board highlighted the issue of illuminating the dials, Doug suggested using SMD LED option and I had ordered some (10pcs T0402WM Pre-soldered Micro Litz Wired Leads Warm White SMD Led 0402 UK) I was to say the least surprised how small these were and it made the mounting a challenge. Since the dash board sits above the wooden top any Led lighting underneath would let stray light escape at the sides; so I needed to make something that would contain the light in each dial. A simple aluminium ring around each dial would (should) work I machined up 4 small rings and 1 large, next I needed a method of mounting the Led in the centre of each ring. I drilled a 0.8mm hole in the side of each ring then pushed the Led into the centre position and used cyno in the hole to hold it in position. Each of the rings were then epoxied into position on the rear of the panel and the wires gently formed to follow the other Led wires. When all this was set I attempted to reassemble the panel to the guide rails whilst feeding the wires through the back, all went OK and all the Leds worked however with the additional wires behind the panel it made the sliding action rather stiff because the additional wire were rubbing, despite a number of attempts to ease the problem it still is rather stiff. The illumination of the dials was to be using a paper encapsulated overlay with an LED behind each; at this stage the overlay is temporary and isn’t secured to the baking so the dials aren’t defined very well.
    I have decided that I’m not satisfied with this method of illuminating the dials so back to the drawing board.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by Skydive130 ( Rear Admiral)
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    This is the one area of the hobby I am simply inept at? Lighting wiring looms fill me with dread and is really something I need to learn more about. Watching you and Rob weave your magic, along with Dougs input has been very informative. I look forward to seeing how your instrument panel with the cheap n cheerful leds turns outπŸ‘
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi Doug, so many questions but I'm not sure I have all the answers.
    Two rails are the simple solution but at the moment the rails are joined by a strap but also they are bolted to the aluminium plate so the new design will have to be made from a non-conductive material, this will be Perspex.
    However the wires need to be soldered to a "stationary" common positive + solder tag and also a negative - solder tag. In the photo the rails are running on the part that bolts trough to the dash support panel and will have a + and - power supply, this piece has to be mounted prior to the dash panel being put in its final position.
    So all the wiring has to be done first, so additional stationary contact points need to be added, these will be pieces of the larger tube with a tag added and they will be glued into the top holes providing a stationary solder point. I'm working on this now and as soon as I have the job done I'll post some pictures which hopefully will show clearly the solution.
    The dials so far have just been printed on paper but when pressed against the aluminium face are better defined however, I will try your suggestions of photo paper or transparent foil / decal 'paper' or indeed anything that may produce the effect I’m looking for.
    Let’s wait and see.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Mike,
    Just Googled your LEDs
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-x-0402-Warm-White-LED-SMD-Ultr...
    and they seem to be designated 'Ultra Bright'.
    So I'm sure that the 'readability' would be improved by dimming them with a higher value resistor.
    Cheers, Doug 😎
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-x-0402-Warm-White-LED-SMD-Ultra-Bright-UK-1st-CLASS-POST-/121783003829
    πŸ”—
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    I agree GrahamπŸ‘

    MIKE; you only need two wires going down from the panel; + and -.
    Using the Micro Litz (so your LEDs came from Germany eh?πŸ‘) wires of the LEDs simply connect together behind the panel all negs and all possies, then just take two supply wires down below. You can use the offcuts of Micro Litz (or wrapping wire) for that. The LEDs only need a handful of mA!

    I'm also puzzled by the 'paper encapsulated overlay' in front of the LED!
    Surely that will simply act as a diffuser, so no wonder that the dials are not well defined.
    If the LEDs are too bright, also making the dials difficult to 'read', just increase the dropping resistor in the + supply lead to dim them a little. They deffo look too bright to me πŸ™ˆ
    Suck it and see before going back to square one πŸ˜‰
    BTW: Are the dials printed on photo paper or transparent foil / decal 'paper'?
    Cheers, Doug 😎
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by Graham93 ( Commodore)
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    Hi Michael,

    Nice work on the LED mounts for the dials. I agree with Rob, it should be possible to reduce the number of wires going to the panel. Depending on what the requirement is, you could get it down to as few as two, if you just want all the LEDs either on or off. Looking at the photos, you could also use thinner wire for the large panel LEDs making it easier to fit the panel.

    Graham93
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi Rob I have already made the replacement which uses two rails + - I'm just in the process of micro surgery soldering
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Hi Mike.
    If all the leds are on a common switched circuit why not use common supply rails to the panel for all so that you only have two wires. Alternatively you could reconsider backlighting the panel as I suggested previously.
    Rob
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Instrument panel
    6 months ago by Newby7 ( Vice Admiral)
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    Glad your fingers work for so small items Mike.I'd be in trouble just seeing that small an installation never mind trying to figure out the wiring.Well done.
    Rick
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    πŸ“ Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Brass capping
    One of the things evident on the real craft is the brass capping on the rear cabin supports, I’m not sure of its purpose other than it could be an area of wear as officers bend to enter the cabin, however I’m not questioning its purpose but wanting to make my model as near the original as possible so I cut some strips of brass sheet 1mm thick x 5.5mm wide, I do this using a fine toothed slitting saw in the milling machine cutting a strip of any width I want and leaving a β€œ buckle free” strip unlike you get using tin snips. I then make a pencil trace of the shape and use this to bend the brass strip to shape. It now requires some 0.5 mm holes to allow me to pin the strips to the wood, adding some epoxy resin to make a tight fitting rail.
    Spray rail
    Next is the spray rail on the roof, this looks a simple enough item but it requires to be bent in 3 plains (roof curve, sweepback, and lean back) so I decided to laminate the piece on a jig with the same forms as the roof. It made fitting to the roofs shape much easier with minimal trimming. I held the rail on using 0.5 mm pins these were drilling into the underside of the rail and glued in place, leaving about 3mm proud to go through the cabin roof. Marking the position of the pins on the roof is easily done by placing a piece of masking tape on a piece of expanded polystyrene and then just pushing into the tape and polystyrene this leaves holes in the tape which can now be transferred to the cabin roof in the correct position the marked holes can then be drilled through in the exact position. I use some canopy adhesive on the underside of the rail to secure it in position.
    Window frames
    The manufacture of the window frames was detailed earlier and all that is required now is to secure them in position. I use a 2mm wide extra strong double sided tape which I found to be capable of securing aluminium sheet whilst machining! (The dash board). This tape was placed along the back face of all the frames and then each frame was positioned and pressed firmly home, the tape reaches its maximum strength after 12 hours and believe me it’s really difficult to remove when fully cured.
    Hand rails
    These again were detailed earlier and only needed to be glued in place and as with the spray rails I used the tape transfer method to position the holes and a small amount of canopy adhesive on each leg then pushed home.
    Kent clearview
    This little detail was made from black Perspex, I machined an outer ring and centre stud and then a small triangular piece extending to the centre stud was hand fashioned then all tree pieces were stuck to the front window with canopy glue.
    Life ring and horns
    Both these details had been previously made and trial fitted so it was a simple attachment job using the 8BA studs in the bases.
    Search light
    This item has already been tested so all that’s required is to bolt it in position and feed the wires through into the cabin; I made provision for the electrical connection so a plug is crimped on the wires and plugged into the distribution board.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Thank you mike,
    It's great to be back.
    I feel much better altho not 100%.

    Martin555.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Thanks to all for your encouraging and kind comments, but more importantly welcome back to Martin I'm glad your feeling better.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Mike,
    You are a true master.
    It is a pleasure to follow your build logs.
    I like the way you take the time to make and use Jigs to ensure that everything is lined up the same and identical.
    Also i like the way you have made the mast plug in.
    Excellent workmanship.

    She is going to be another boat to be extremely proud of.


    Martin555.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by MouldBuilder ( Rear Admiral)
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    Really nice work as usual Mike.πŸ‘πŸ‘
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by stevedownunder ( Lieutenant)
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    Hi Mike,

    Beautiful work, a bit of final assembly is a nice thing.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Hi Mike.
    Very nice finishing detail πŸ‘πŸ‘.
    I really like the way you've made the spray rail and I wish that I'd laminated the spray rail on mine as it was a b***r to form the piece with three curvatures just by steaming. When I last looked at mine the spray rail had lifted slightly at both ends ☹️so I may have to re-make it using your method πŸ˜€πŸ‘.
    Rob.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final cabin detail
    7 months ago by Skydive130 ( Rear Admiral)
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    There you go with your lovely brass work mike, looks fantastic πŸ‘
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    πŸ“ Final Lacquer
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    This part of the build is a delicate one, First the water line has been applied and I must ensure that it is firmly stuck without any tiny edges coming loose especially where the line crosses the chine and around the bow and two corners on the stern. Having made sure all is stuck, then the hull gets three coats of satin lacquer.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final Lacquer
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Doug I see what you were saying, it is a result of the angle I've taken the picture, from slightly above and the water line actually disappears onto the flat width of the chine (not visible) and reappears slightly further along giving the appearance of nearly thinning completely.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final Lacquer
    7 months ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Mike, Rob,
    It wasn't so much the waterline being bent as such (but now you come to mention it 😁).
    No. It was more the way that the Trim/Boottop/Waterline seems to shrink and distort as it goes over the chine rail.
    Maybe an optical delusion as Rob says. A side on right way up pic would maybe settle it.
    Seeing the problems this causes I'm inclined to leave my Sea Scout as just a pure blue hull πŸ™„
    Or, apply / paint the trim line now and then fit the chine / spray rail afterwards.
    Cheers, Doug 😎
    PS Hadn't rated you as a Plonker Rob πŸ˜‰ 😁
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final Lacquer
    7 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Hi Mike.
    I'm pretty sure your waterline is level, it must just be an optical illusion that the line appears bent because the eye perceives the chine and hull bottom to be straight and level...which it's not. You really have to 'sight' the line by looking from bow to stern to see if the line is straight or not.
    I had a similar thing when doing my Police Boat too.
    Plonking it in the water is the real test 😁.
    Rob.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final Lacquer
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi Doug I see what you mean about the water line it does look bent in these pictures. I did as Rob does and used a laser to mark the line then followed the marks with the trim line in white, However even when I look at it it looks a bit odd depending where you look at it from. The final situation is - It won't sink even if the line isn't truly on the WATER - I hope. Ill try and doe some pics when I get chance - too busy in the garden at the moment.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final Lacquer
    7 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Mike has done a fine job painting the hull πŸ‘πŸ‘
    And yes, you're quite correct Doug, my particular bΓͺte noire is getting the waterline marking to stay stuck around corners and over chines.
    Sensibly Mike has ensured his is firmly fixed and then sealed with multiple coats of a satin lacquer finish. That'll do the job πŸ˜€
    Rob.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Final Lacquer
    7 months ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Paintwork looks great Michael, πŸ‘
    Not altogether too convinced about the trim line over the chine though πŸ€“
    Can we see it in side view right way up please?
    Seems to be a perennial problem, which I'm gonna have on my Sea Scout as well.
    Also one of Rob's pet hates I believe.
    Cheers, Doug 😎
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    πŸ“ Rear Seat
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    The rear seat is almost the same construction as the battery cover at the bow albeit square with no angled top, the space for equipment at the rear is quite tight and to make it look like a seat things will have to be compact. We have the ESC and receiver along with all the wires from the cabin and the motor, also the water cooling system all to be contained under the seat.
    Again the frame is made from 5mm x 5mm walnut and the magnets are inserted in pairs into the wood to make sure the polarity is correct. I can then make up the frame to cover all the items and glue/pin it together. When the frame is set I can cut pieces if 1.5mm thick walnut sheet and edge it in 5 x 5mm walnut then glue it to the frame. Finally both the front battery cover and the seat will get a couple of coats of satin lacquer.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Rear Seat
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi Rob, that's funny I've been doing exactly the same, I am a keen gardener and grow all my own plants so this time of year is really busy and for some reason the weeds continue to grow despite my efforts to kill them.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Rear Seat
    7 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Hi Mike.
    Now that the Pilot Boat is finished I'm taking the opportunity to catch up with gardening, house repairs and decorating. I just spent the day in the garden and frankly I'm 'cream crackered' from all the effort πŸ˜€. Jet washing the decking and re-oiling it tomorrow. I'm still waiting for MC to deliver the next project, some last minute design changes I'm told so it could be a few weeks yet. Hoping to get some boating in with the club if we can do it within the restrictions 🀞😊. Rob.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Rear Seat
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    That's right Rob I'm at the stage where I keep finding bits I've not finished and they then they tend to take longer to complete as I have to get my brain in gear as to where I was and what I did.
    But I'm still really enjoying this build
    PS I was worried you'd stopped posting but 'ha ho' here you are (when's the next project coming?) the site seems short of content lately or is it that you have left a great void?😜
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Rear Seat
    7 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Hi Mike.
    More great progress πŸ˜€πŸ‘
    Not far off finishing now?
    Rob.
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    πŸ“ Battery cover and instrument panel
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    The main battery is located at the front of the β€œBOX” area and contains a main switch for the power, the design of this area was originally by Rob who came up with the idea of having the main power switch operated by the steering wheel so hiding the switch operation. I also wanted to have a β€œDash Board” to simulate the real boat and for it to have a couple of Leds as well as the illuminated dials so this needs to be mounted around the steering wheel and to move up and down as the β€œswitch” is moved on and off. The dash board is made of aluminium and shaped as the original with four dials and three lights with a central hole where the switch/steering wheel fits.
    I decided to build the wooden frame for the box using magnets to hold it in position and then to fill in the body area with some 2.5mm walnut sheet which was surrounded with 5x5mm walnut strips to form the whole cover. The magnets are an important part of this construction and as such the placement of them has to be accurate, so to achieve this they are drilled in pairs and the magnets glued into the wood in pairs.
    I cut an initial slot to try the switch operation and placed the dash board in place this gives me an indication as to how far the aluminium dash has to move up and down. The next issue is how to make the dash to move up and down without it tipping sideways and also allowing the wires for the Leds to move freely underneath.
    I used some 2.5mm sq tube with a 1.5mm sq tube running inside as a runner the larger tube is fastened to the cover with some 8BA nuts soldered to its side and then bolted through the top which has had wood hardener applied to strengthen the area. The central smaller rails are fastened to the aluminium dash with two 10BA screws; this allows the aluminium dash to slide freely up and down, I now need to put additional holes/slots to allow the wires to run freely through the wooden top.
    The wires need to be connected to the 6v supply which is located in the central motor housing so a connector is required to allow the dash housing to be removed when required and any Led to be changed if they fail. The illumination of the dials is yet another hurdle which I not sure can be jumped and it may be that the illumination has to be from above as there just isn’t enough room between the aluminium dash and the wooden top.
    PS not sure why it duplicarted all the pics but Ive deleted them
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Battery cover and instrument panel
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi Doug, Rob, thanks for your really helpful suggestions. As you will have seen in all my work I don't usually take the easy option, if I did I would have finished this boat and the crash tender a year ago 😊
    Anyway to your suggestions I have considered the Perspex option and am currently carrying out trials to make this an option, this would also need illuminating so maybe an SMD.
    Rob drilling through each "dial hole" although it would work it would also compromise the integrity of the wood even though I have hardened it, so I think that's not an option, It would have worked if I had used some aluminium for the top and veneered it, but unfortunately I didn't.
    Doug the SMD LED option again under consideration I have ordered some from EBay so I'm waiting for them to arrive. I have a 6V supply which is located in the centre motor housing and this supplies all the Led lighting in the cabin and stern, so a supply isn't a problem.
    So again thanks for your suggestions and watch this space.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Battery cover and instrument panel
    7 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Hi Mike.
    Thinking about your lighting conundrum....πŸ€”
    As the LED's will only be lit when the switch is in the ON position why not just drill through all the dial locations when the switch is in the ON position and place a LED light source below it or perhaps a piece of Perspex that is edge lit. The supply can be taken from the LiPo from the switch, possible even without a resistor dropper as Doug suggested. I guess a lot of this depends on how much space you have between the top of the ali switch bracket and the underside of the wood top panel ?
    Rob.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Battery cover and instrument panel
    7 months ago by robbob ( Admiral)
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    Hi Mike.
    Wow...well you've really elaborated on my idea and it's looking really good so far, and beautifully engineered as we've all come to expect, but I can see that the lighting aspect of your design is going to be real challenge to incorporate into the panel. I'm looking forward to seeing how you accomplish that.
    Keep up the great work πŸ˜€πŸ‘.
    Rob,
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Battery cover and instrument panel
    7 months ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Have you ever worked in Germany Michael?
    They have a saying here -
    "Warum einfach wenn es auch kompliziert geht?"
    'Why simple when it can also be complicated?'
    Nicely done, given the initial design premise!πŸ™„

    Re illuminating the dials:- πŸ’‘
    How about fibre optic filaments?
    Bundled together and taped to the top of a bright white (or yellow?) LED with reflective tape; e.g. chrome tape.
    The LED can be mounted underneath the box/wooden top and the filaments (2 or 3 per dial) taken through small slots to the dials.
    Alternatively: you could put tiny a SMD LED (ca 1mm square and 1/2mm thick) behind each dial, connect to the supply volts with wrapping wire. A fiddle to solder but .... you want small!! πŸ˜‰ Where there's a will ... Michael! 😁
    Cheers, Doug 😎
    BTW Summat's gone wonky with your pics. Try deleting and reloading them.
    Looking in the Edit box I can't tell which are the false ones, and the last time I tried to correct something like this by deleting ONE of the duplicates ALL the pics of the same image vanished 😭
    BTW2: If you go the SMD LED way you can connect all four in series and feed 'em from a small 3S LiPo (11.1V Nom) without needing a dropping resistor. Then you only need to fiddle two small wires through to supply them. They'll only need about 25 -30mA so wrapping wire would be fine.πŸ‘
    Or; two pairs. Each pair supplied from the same 6V source, e.g. 4 x AAA cells. Again no resistor needed.😊 Even 4 silver oxide button cells (1.55V Nom) would work for an hour or so if you want to save weight.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Battery cover and instrument panel
    7 months ago by stevedownunder ( Lieutenant)
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    Hi Mike,

    Amazing, beautifully done, though I think it could have been more involved for an on\off switch, haha.
    Lovely work.πŸ‘
    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ“ Painting the cabin
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Another job that’s been hanging around for some time and that’s painting the outside and inside of the cabin, as its removable it makes it a little easier to do. So first check is to make sure all the walnut wood adornments are in place or that the fixing holes are present since I don’t want to be drilling holes in new paintwork, so all ready for paint, The masking is a time consuming process and has to be done with care. The paint job will as all the rest 2/3 coats grey primer, I use commercial cellulose which I thin myself as it’s so much cheaper than rattle tins. This is rubbed down between coats ready for the final coats of appliance white, I leave it to dry but not too long as the sooner you remove the masking the better, leaving it too long can cause the tape to pull at the paint and tear the edges.
    All that remains is to put on the navigation lights, hand rails, search lights and wire them all into the circuit board, these items were completed some time ago.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Painting the cabin
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    I can't disagree with more boats😁 however spray equipment isn't cheap and I think to pay out for a decent set can't be justified for painting model boats I'm fortunate that I already had the equipment but I have to say if I was painting a range of odd colours I couldn't justify a litre of paint so I would use rattle tins and if cost wasn't a factor rattle tins are easiest.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Painting the cabin
    7 months ago by Graham93 ( Commodore)
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    Thanks Michael,

    I don't have the spray equipment. There is low cost kit available, however I expect you get what you pay for. It sounds like it is economic, but only if you have a lot to do in one colour. I want to paint the hull of my Cutter with three different colours. Looks like rattle cans will work out a lot cheaper unless I can find a use for the left over colours (more boats?!)

    Graham93
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Painting the cabin
    7 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi Graham, I tend to use where possible cellulose paints as I have all the spray equipment from my kit car building days plus its a great deal cheaper than rattle tins, although maybe not as convenient, so I tent to wait until I have a batch of spraying to do all together. I do use rattle cans for odd colours such as gun metal where you don't use a lot.
    But to answer your question I spray both top and undercoats
    PS you can get a litre for about Β£20 plus thinners @Β£12 which will make up to about 20 rattle cans
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Painting the cabin
    7 months ago by Graham93 ( Commodore)
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    Hi Michael,

    Nice result on the painting.

    Do you apply the primer coats with a brush, or spray? Is the Appliance white also a commercial cellulose finish or something else?

    I don't like using rattle cans!

    Graham93
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    πŸ“ Deck Grips
    8 months ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Here's just a few more pictures to help with the understanding of the process, they show the little jig that was used to tap the pins in to length before the head is cut off and the grouping of the pieces to put a radius on each end.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Deck Grips
    8 months ago by stevedownunder ( Lieutenant)
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    Lovely work Mike.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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