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>> Home > Members > Delboy
Registered
21st May 2013
Last Online
24th Jul 2018
Delboy

Member Stats
Stats
Member No. 2436
Registered 21st May 2013
Last Online 24th Jul 2018
City Guernsey
Country United Kingdom
Boats in Harbour 0
Sailing Locations 0
Forum Posts 29
Photos Posted 1
Likes Received 18
Likes Given 6
29 Total Posts
Sailing Locations
No Sailing Locations
Harbour
Empty Harbour
Sub-Lieutenant
Ranks Points
Fleet Admiral 1000
Admiral 800
Captain 600
Commander 400
Lieutenant 200
Sub-Lieutenant 100
Chief Petty Officer 50
Petty Officer 25
Seaman 10
Apprentice 2
Recruit 0
90 points away from Lieutenant!
Points
Activity Worth Awarded
Boats in Harbour 8 0
Forum Thread 5 10
Forum Post 2 58
Event 8 0
Photo Gallery 10 0
Photos Response 3 0
Video Post 15 0
Video Response 3 0
Build Blog 20 0
Blog Post 5 0
Blog Response 3 0
Sailor 8 0
Guestbook Post 8 0
Liked Posts 1 6
Received Likes 2 36
110 Total Points
United Kingdom
Recent Posts
Port holes by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Well, he's 3D printed so I can scale him as needed. Scaled at 80 percent he turns out around 1/24. Scale it to around 55 percent and that should give you 1/32.

Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-) by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
I was working on a contract for Digital Equipment Corp at Unterfoering and was staying at the other end of town at Westkreuz (Gaestehaus im Forum). I've had the Ultimaker for 2 or 3 years now. It's great for making the little things. Ship's wheel - 6 hours by hand, 1 hour on the printer. Design it once, print as many as you need. Bits and bollards, fairleads, funnels, ventilators - not cheap from the shop (if they have any) pennies on the printer. Best investment ever.

Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-) by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Doug, A phenomenal place, the Deutche Museum. I visited it when I was working in Munich back in '87/'88. I agree with the views on scratch building. It's the difference between Model Making and model assembly. Although, I have to say that, although my 3D printing has been poo-pooed in this forum as non-traditional - is anybody out there still using horse-hoof glue and bamboo strip - most of the stuff I print is self designed. All the hulls I have built have been hand built. I do have one kit with a moulded hull - a Graupner Optimist- it's been in the garage attic unfinished since 1993. I must get round to it one day. But before that, there's this Ferret plan in the MB mag. That looks interesting.....

Port holes by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
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Port holes by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
At risk of appearing to teach monkeys to suck eggs or grandmas to climb trees... Upon pondering the subject of potholes; plans always show them as port holes and after-build photographs show them as painted black circles. I know what I prefer. On line purchases of brass port holes can be not cheap. I've found that normal brass eyelets with a blob of Deluxe Materials Glue 'n' Glaze in the hole dries to a passable imitation of the real thing. I appreciate that you are just swapping the painstaking painting of rows of black circles with painstakingly drilling a row of holes and gluing them in but if you question the sanity of building a miniature boat then it all seems quite normal. And if you have any issues, take them up with my mate Popeye.

Stuck in the middle. by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
You could always build a get-out-of-trouble springer tug model. So, when you get into trouble, you could send in the cavalry.

Crew by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Well, you can always scale it on your slicer. I reckon that 80 percent is about 1/24 scale.

Crew by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
I can only speak for myself but I hate to see model boats tooling about with nobody on the bridge, like the Marie Celeste or a Philippine super tanker. So, i was very pleased to find this able bodied seaman that I can reproduce on my 3D printer. https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2757066

What transmitter , receiver by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Planet kit is cheap and cheerful, if it's still in production. It's not got the most bells and whistles but it's functional and at an affordable price. Take a look at the Howe's double page advert in MB magazine. They often have special deals.

3d printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
Oops! I just noticed that Jarvo suggested the same approach. Still, great minds, etc, eh Jarvo? Except that you just make the hole a 'cylinder' with a facet count of 6, i.e. hexagonal.

3d printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
I have been guilty of thinking along conventional lines. There's no need to cut a thread in the prop. Just design the prop with provision for a nut to be glued into it.

3d printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
Whoa! Propellers are a serious 3D proposition! Not least as you can't have a threaded prop/shaft. Well, you could but it would be rat shit. Shall have to think about that one. I'm speaking from the design perspective, of course. The Machine does what it's told to do.

3d printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
T'is the season of night school. Check out your local college of further education to see if they offer any 3D printing courses.

DRAGONFLITE 95 MAINSAIL LUFF RINGS by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
A looks about right, Les. That's how they are on my Dragon 65.

3d printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
Everything is feasible. You have to realise the constraints of the system though. My printer has a maximum build volume of around 200x200x200 mm which is generous in the home printer category. Many are much smaller. So, to get a model of any size, you might have to cut it into blocks which are glued together after printing.

3d printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
Sorry. That should be: Www.nesta.org.uk/uk-makerspaces-data

3d printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
If you don't have access to a 3D printer, it might be worth your while checking whether their is a local Maker space you can join. They will almost certainly have a 3D printer you can borrow and are likely to also have laser cutting, metal turning and milling, and a host of other facilities normally outside the pocket of the average modeller. We are just starting up our Maker space in Guernsey but to find out if you have one near you, check www.nesta.org.uk/uk-makerspace-data.

3D printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
Hmm. Deja vu. I didn't miss the point. It's more that the point was poorly made. You don't rely on people to do everything for you except make the hull, draw the plans, etc etc. So the original statement was silly. I too am a pensioner with the obvious limited financial resources. I just have a 3D printer which I use for many purposes. So, you don't have the skills to use one. That's no big deal, I can't dance or juggle but still get along OK. The thread is about 3D printing and shouldn't be rat-holed because you don't have access to a printer.

3D printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
That's a fair comment but you could say the same about buying a pre-moulded hull or a kit. But, take it to its logical conclusion, do you fabricate your own plywood? Cultivate, and harvest your own balsa wood/bass wood/mahogany? Be a purist if that's what you want but is it right to sneer at others who find their own path to tread?

3D printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
Reprap is practically the industry standard for 3D printing. It doesn't say how large the print volume is, the Ultimaker is around 200 x 200 x 200 mm. The picture is difficult to read but it doesn't look as if it has a heated build plate in which case, you are going to need an enclosure of some sort to keep drafts out to avoid your prints warping. You can't argue with the price, though.

3D printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
As a post post script regarding your comment concerning printing parts to make the machine better. This is probably the case with most printers in this sort of price range but it's not arduous and, if you design the parts yourself using something like OpenSCAD then you you know that you have really earned that whisky nightcap.

3D printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
As a post script, Cura allows you to print direct from your PC via a USB cable (supplied with the printer) or to write the GCode to an SD card which slots into the printer and from which you can select the file to print.

3D printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
I wasn't sure that the Ultimaker original+ is still available but I just checked and it is at 995 Euros. It comes as a flat-pack with all the necessary pieces and, with mine, a free spool of filament. The frame is made from high quality ply wood and the quality and accuracy of the laser cutting is astonishing although you might need to ease a few of the joints with sand paper for a not too snug fit. I sealed my frame with cellulose dope floor a quick-dry finish. The electronics and stepper motors are easy to fit as is the setting up of the transmission components although the latter are a bit fiddly. All in all, it was good fun building the beast. Printing with it is easy, you download the Cura program which will build your G-Code files from an STL file and allow you to set up the printing parameters for the job. I've had a few disasters but generally get good results with PLA printed at 205 degrees with a bed temperature of 50 degrees. I've found PLA from Rigid Ink gives the best results but, to be honest, I haven't exactly 'played the field's with filament providers. One point in favour of Rigid Ink is that, once you are on their email distribution list, they will send you hints and tips for printing which is a boon as Ultimaker don't provide a pilot's operating hand book or much further reading on it. Would I get another one? Probably, yes.

3D printing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
I've been using a 3D printer for 18 months now. Very useful for printing things like ship's wheels, bollards, etc. Thingiverse is a useful resource although, these days, every other design seems to be for a fidget spinner - very yawn inspiring. I design much of the stuff I print with OpensCAD, an open source (free) application but it helps to have a bit of computer programming experience to use it effectively.

Fiberglassing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
As I recall from my material science studies, a resin coat on its own will strengthen a thin wood panel but it is prone to cracking. Once it has cracked to a certain extent, any strength it has imparted will have evaporated and all you are left with is extra weight. Glass fibres added to the resin act to prevent cracks propagating through the material and add to its toughness. So resin adds strength, glass fibre adds toughness.

Counter Rotating Props by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
Sorry to be pedantic but I do like to be specific. Counter rotating props will always be turning inwards whichever direction they turn. I am assuming (!) that turning inwards in this context means that, seen from aft looking forward, the port screw is turning clockwise and the starboard screw is turning anti-clockwise. Correct or no?

glass cloth or tissue? by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
I always use lightweight glass fabric. I have tried model airplane tissue, horticultural fleece and just about anything else that could possibly be a cheap solution. Nothing works like glass fabric though. I find Deluxe Materials is the handiest source for me.

Help required please. by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
Ha ha! I once crossed the road in Munich without using the pedestrian crossing and had a rolled umbrella waggled at me by an elderly lady for being a bad example fur die junge leute. They do love their rules in Bavaria.

Fiberglassing by Delboy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
I find Eze-Kote from Deluxe materials a much better material to work with than epoxy or polyester. It's a water-based resin which provides a waterproof and fuel-proof finish. you may need three or four coats but that's not a chore as it's easy to apply, there's no wastage as the pot never 'goes-off' and it's dry to a paint-able surface in half an hour. You clean up with water as well.