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    6

















    Followers
    From plan to board
    by Skippydrew ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง ( Master Seaman)
    ๐Ÿ“ฃ










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    11 Posts 10 Replies 10 Photos 20 Likes
    ( Newest Posts Shown First )
    dave976
    Lieutenant
    ๐Ÿ“ From plan to board
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 32 seconds ago
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    Hi Jordan
    I believe you have received good advice on several methods to produce your model.
    Another very important consideration is the scale and size of model that you have space to build and can transport.
    So you really need to ensure your model fits these boundaries.
    Initially I suspect you will not be attempting an exact true scale as this is more suitable for the more experienced so a stand off scale allows a bit more flexibility in adapting to size.
    Once you know the max size you need to invest in a good solid flat building board. You then mark a solid line down the centre along the longest length. This will provide you with a fixed datum line from which you can check all measurements. I mark the prow and stern positions to ensure I keep to my max size after allowing for any plank / skin covering thickness.
    I usually build my hulls upside down but you can build from keel up. Mark the individual former distances on the board and use a set square to extend a line at each point to the board edges. I add small blocks of wood either side of each former along the outside edges to keep all square.
    Prepare cardboard masters from your plan and check them for accuracy on the centre line and to the edge. This will also indicate any misplacement of the keel / stringers which you can correct.
    If all is correct you can cut formers from wood (or chosen material) and should have a good starting point to start constructing your hull.
    There are many build blogs on this site that have detailed the process, but I attach a couple of pics of my RMS Olympic and Bill Lucy's RMS Titanic under construction using this method.
    Happy building and please ask if you need any clarification.
    dave976
    3
    tim morland
    Petty Officer 1st Class
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 5 days ago
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    Hi Jordan,
    Just sticking my oar in (no pun intended). I photocopy like John and Wallismanby but cut roughly round the photocopy image and stick it straight onto the wood. I once made the mistake of sticking the plan down with PVA glue and couldn't get it off the wood. I now use something like wallpaper paste which soaks off readily. The paper stretches slightly when wet, but when cutting along the black line of the plan allows for cleaning up if you're clumsy with a saw, like me. If you keep using the original plan it soon tears along creases or you get glue on it. Photocopies are always a good idea to work from.
    It boils down to personal choice in the end.
    Good luck Tim
    2
    Skippydrew
    Master Seaman
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 20 hours ago
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    Thank you all for your input, I guess ile just have to work out what works best for me! ๐Ÿ˜Š

    Jordan
    JDrew
    JOHN
    Warrant Officer
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
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    Agree totally with the photocopying and sticking on card, however, one has to be careful - sometimes the printer distort the drawings to fit onto the paper - this is especially evident when using plans from magazines. I believe Martin the Scots Martin as I call him :-) he had a lot of trouble copying frames, due to distortion. So, anyone photocopying - word of caution check there is no distortion.

    John
    2
    wallismanby
    Recruit
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 2 hours ago
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    Photo copy on to card cut out draw round works well for me
    JOHN
    Warrant Officer
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    Hi there

    As has been suggested, there are several other methods for transferring from plans to the building materials. It depends on your own self and your own preference. The more practice the better your skills become with less mistakes. Pick a method or try several until you find one which suits you.

    I prefer the tracing method - to me this does have several advantages - especially when producing a complicated hull shape. You can lay your tracings on top of each other to ensure your tracings all run true. The other advantage is, when you place the tracing on the materials that you are going to use, you can move them around so you gain the best use from your materials with the least wastage.

    Couple of images from a few builds that I have done. If you would like to read through a few complete builds for the beginner - there are a series of builds in the masterclass section of Mayhem. Starting with a very easy Swordsman build and ending with the build of RAF Whaleback - diagonally planked.
    2
    roycv
    Midshipman
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 2 hours ago
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    Hi again, If you are just copying across straight bulkhead lines then the easy way is to lay the plan over the wood in the correct place and make a pin hole through all the corners and then join them up on the wood with a ruler.
    Otherwise for round section hulls I draw on tracing paper an exact axis of 2 lines at 90 degrees. The crossing point to be at the water level which will be a straight fore and aft line. I draw just one half section.

    Then I fold the tracing paper across along the vertical drawn line and matching the horizontal line and copy the already traced side to the other. You draw over the reversed tracing paper and the original lines will transfer across.
    This gives you a symetrical complete section. I do not know whether there are more modern ways to do this but it has worked for me.
    Roy
    2
    ChrisF
    Midshipman
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 11 hours ago
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    Hi Jordon - I produce and print off my own drawings so going over them with a Biro isn't a problem for me. You could always use a pen that has run out so as not to deface your drawings. Trouble with the tracing paper method for me is that you have to go over it twice and the lines can be indistinct. There is no best way though, we all have our favoured method.

    Chris
    3
    Building 6 Faireys at a scale of 1:12 and another in the pipeline!
    Skippydrew
    Master Seaman
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 20 hours ago
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    Thank you! Carbon paper is how I did the lines for my fast patrol boat I was curious if there were any other good ways of doing it. I may get some tracing paper and a pack of A4 paper and cut the templates without defacing the plan itself.

    Regards
    Jordan
    1
    JDrew
    ChrisF
    Midshipman
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    Country: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom
    Online: 11 hours ago
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    Hi - there are a number of ways as you have mentioned. Some folks copy to tracing paper in pencil and then draw over it again so that the pencil transfers to the ply wood, others cut out the templates and glue them with low tack adhesive. What works best for me is using carbon paper and drawing over the plan lines.

    If you go down the tracing or carbon paper route then get yourself a set of French curves, dress-making curves and circle stencils as well as a long ruler.

    Chris
    4
    Building 6 Faireys at a scale of 1:12 and another in the pipeline!
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