|||
Current Website Support
79
Contributors
32
Subscribers
You are Not Registered
Subscribe for your gold medal ๐Ÿ…
Less Ads
Ad Free
Until Cancelled
ยฃ1
ยฃ2
ยฃ3
ยฃ5
Donate for your silver medal ๐Ÿ…
Less Ads
Ad Free
12 Months
ยฃ10
ยฃ15
ยฃ25
ยฃ50
You Will Be Helping Towards:

  • Domain Fees
  • Security Certificates
  • iOS & Android App Fees
  • Website Hosting
  • Fast Servers
  • Data Backups
  • Upkeep & Maintenance
  • Administration Costs

    Without your support the website wouldn't be what it is today.

    Please consider donating towards these fees to help keep us afloat.

    Read more

    All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

    Many thanks for your kind support
  • Join Us On Social Media!
    Download The App!

    Login to Remove Ads
    Model Boats Website
    Model Boats Website
    Home
    Forum
    Build Blogs
    Media Gallery
    Boat Clubs & Lakes
    Events
    Boat Harbour
    How-To Articles
    Plans & Docs
    Useful Links
    18

















    Followers
    Vosper MTB379
    by mturpin013 ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง ( Vice Admiral)
    ๐Ÿ“ฃ










    Click To
    Follow
    14 Posts 41 Comments 0 Photos 106 Likes
    Most recent posts shown first   (Show Oldest First) (Print Booklet)
    ๐Ÿ“ VOSPER MTB 379
    20 days ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    The MTB is finally finished and sails really well apart from its maiden voyage when my Grandson (who's the boat owner) did a rather sharp turn at top speed in choppy waters which resulted in an upturned boat. However, it just floats so no damage just had to retrieve it with the rescue boat.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 54 Views
    7
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: VOSPER MTB 379
    10 days ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    Thanks for your guidance JB , l have made the rudder throw smaller so we will see if that helps, if not we will try the prop sizes , Im away at the moment but I will check the prop rotations
    Again thanks for the help
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 16 Views
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: VOSPER MTB 379
    18 days ago by jbkiwi ( Fleet Admiral)
    Flag
    Nicely done Mike๐Ÿ‘. Just a question/suggestion,- which way are your props rotating ? (looking from the back),- if they are rotating inwards, try swapping sides and rotate them outwards. Also try going down a prop size and reduce the rudder throw. This should help with keeping it up the right way. Also make sure it balances behind the center. Any of this obviously only applies if it's not set up like this now.

    JB
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 33 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ Ammunition cases
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    There are quite quantities of ammunition cases, which in the main are all the same but with some small differences. Each case is made from four sides a lid and base with hinges on one side.
    The sides were all cut on the circular saw to ensure the consistency of dimensions, some were taller than others but in all the lids were all of the same dimensions.
    The sides were glued together with the aid of some solid brass bars to ensure the sides are held at 90 degrees with the base piece inserted whilst the adhesive sets, a final trim on the disc sander to ensure clean sides, the insides are then given a coat of thinned Eze Kote before the lid is attached.
    Finally we have something resembling an ammunition box; the lid being attached all that is required is the addition of some hinges.
    The hinges are made from some โ€œTโ€ section styrene, to be able to cut a thin piece of the โ€œTโ€ a jig was made that held the section on all faces so it could be passed through the circular saw, we need 15 hinges in all, however catching them as they flew of the circular saw with increasing distance, I estimate I cut in excess of 30 collecting 15 of them from all over the workshop floor.
    The hinges are attached to the box using a dab of super glue, they are then given a coat of primer followed by a coat of โ€œsea greenโ€.
    In order to attach the ammunition boxes to the deck I drilled two holes in the base of each box and inserted a small length of dowel in each hole, holes were drilled in the deck using a drill template to make sure that the boxes sit in the space provided for each that will be masked when the textured paint is applied, they will then be finally glued in position.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 81 Views
    3
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Ammunition cases
    2 months ago by stevedownunder ( Commander)
    Flag
    Hi Mike,

    Great work, those "T" pieces will be turning up over the next year or so.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 65 Views
    ๐Ÿ“ Railings.
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    The boat has railings along the bow which are supported by 3 posts, and at the bow they are anchored into the deck and at the other end they are supported by the torpedo tubes.
    We have additional rails around the bow gun turret again supported by eight posts and two rails. The posts were made from 3mm brass rod and 1mm rail. The posts were cut to length and the top end rounded in the lathe, I now have to drill 2 holes in each post in line with each other.
    This is done by supporting the post on a 3mm wooden parallel which is fixed in the vice jaws, the first hole is drilled through into the wooden parallel on all eight posts and then a spare drill is pushed through into the parallel which keeps the post vertical allowing it to be moved along to the next hole position which is drilled through thus ensuring both holes are in the vertical plane, each subsequent post is then mounted on the spare drill while each of the remaining 7 holes are drilled
    I then mounted the eight posts into 3mm blind holes around the perimeter of he gun turret where a 3mm brass washer could be soldered in position. A 1mm brass wire was wound round a former (coffee tin) to give an initial curve and then it was fed through the post holes making the join in one of the posts, this was repeated for the lower rail, each of the joints were then soldered. A final coat of primer and black paint completes the gun turret rail.
    The bow rails were manufactured in the same way
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 94 Views
    8
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Railings.
    2 months ago by stevedownunder ( Commander)
    Flag
    Very neat work Mike, ๐Ÿ‘

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 79 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ Torpedo tubes
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    These are essentially another box with a plastic tube on top. The boxes were first prepared by drilling a series of holes in the sides, these were done by clamping all the sides together then drilling through them all, this gives a nice clean hole which requires little deburring a simple rub across with a scotch brite pad removes any โ€œfurโ€. Having cut all the pieces for the boxes they were all treated with a coat of โ€œEzy Koteโ€ diluted at 50/50 with water. This allows a further rub with scotch brite before they are glued together in the same manner as the ammunition boxes using the heavy brass bars.
    The tubes will sit on four curved blocks which are simply made by drilling a number of holes in a piece of 12mm MDF and the cutting them in half and trimming to the final profile using the disc sander, these were then glued to the top of the boxes

    Now the torpedo tubes, these are simply styrene tubes cut to length and an angle of 45 degrees cut on the other end. The plain end was fitted with the back end of my medical injection tubes which give a nice authentic looking end to the tubes. There is a further tube to be added to each tube which represents the firing mechanism at the rear of the tubes this is attached using a hole drilled (using a slot drill) into each tube on the side and the small tube added and cemented with styrene cement. The whole assembly require metal rings around the tubes at various points for these I used โ€œOโ€ rings of varying sizes positioned and super glued. The four assemblies are then primed followed by a finish coat. All Items will be given a coat of satin varnish when all the painting of various colours are finished.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 105 Views
    4
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Torpedo tubes
    2 months ago by ToraDog ( Sub-Lieutenant)
    Flag
    Very nicely done. Simple, but the result is looks like a lot of work.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 92 Views
    ๐Ÿ“ Removable deck fittings
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    Cabin`
    The first item to construct is the main cabin this is a simple construction consisting of 6 pieces. These were all cut out using the โ€œcopy onto sticky back paper and stick onto the plyโ€ then cut out using the fret saw and finishing using the disc sander because the cabin has a floor and step in it the easiest way to construct it is to use 3mm x 3mm obeche and stick the profile onto each side panel this gives a solid frame to glue the floor and walls to . The whole assembly was glued all together using heavy pieces of brass bar to keep it square while it sets

    Ammunition boxes
    In all there are 10 boxes to construct they are all the same foot print but with varying height. So I set the circular saw to cut the appropriate side panels and the top lids out of 1.5 mm ply.
    I used a small jig made from scraps of wood to form a frame that would allow the side panels to be glued in fairly quick succession using the alephatic cement which dries very quickly. The next operation was to round the corners of the lids before they are stuck onto the boxes I then leave overnight to set completely. To make the boxes authentic they need some hinges these were made from a styrene โ€œTโ€ section so I set the circular saw to cut 1mm slices, cutting 20 plus pieces, these were deburred and then cemented using super glue to the lids.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 108 Views
    5
    ๐Ÿ“ removable deck
    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    The plan shows a removable deck area so a frame was made within the area where the bulkheads had been removed. I made the frame allowing a card spacer between the frame and the aperture, then made the cross braces x 4 with the same curve as the main deck. These were glued in position and left to set.
    The frame was then removed and the top made from 1/32 ply which was then glued to the frame using clamps to ensure the curvature was maintained.
    The removable deck was then masked for the areas that needed to be a textured finish, this was done fairly early in the build process
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 113 Views
    3
    ๐Ÿ“ Decking
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    I forgot to mention in the last page that my grandson got the job of painting the inside of the hull. This is for me one of the most important steps in the build, it ensures the future integrity of the hull from ingress of water into the skins and bulkheads itโ€™s really a preventative measure that will pay in the future. The second reason I have the internal hull painted is for purely the aesthetic look and the ease of finding things you subsequently drop into the hull during the continuing build, a light colour also helps in the search process. I usually give a couple of coats of Eze-Kote and then two coats of Hammarite.

    Now to the decking, a most important step in the build, make sure you have done all the things you need to do before the deck is finally secured. As well as the motor mounts I also wanted to put some additional blocks in the stern to support the water scoops and rudder posts, in addition I wanted the bow gun to rotate (a particular request by my grandson) so a mounting box was also built into the bow area to house a servo at deck level.
    I used 0.8mm birch ply for the deck, first of all making a card template to cut an oversize piece of wood, I use 0.5 brass pins to initially pin the bow piece in place, then I did the same with the port and starboard sides, again using the brass pin to hold them in place and making sure the joints with the bow piece were a good fit. I initially made a stern piece but later decided that a removable hatch at the stern was needed as well as the massive hull hatch.
    Now all three pieces are located buy pins I can remove them and mix up a batch of epoxy and start the sticking process, pressing the pins in first and then securing along the edges with further pins. Just a point I find that small gauge brass pins do not always readily stay straight when hit with a hammer so I always pre-drill the hole with a 0.3 mm drill. The whole assembly is left to set overnight.
    (sorry don't know what's happened to the pictures
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 119 Views
    2
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Decking
    5 months ago by stevedownunder ( Commander)
    Flag
    Great work Mike,

    Looks like the photos have appeared, I also had problems loading photos last night, maybe there was a problem with the site.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 117 Views
    ๐Ÿ“ Twin Rudders and water scoops
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    Being twin props we have to have twin rudders and twin water scoops, I have decided in the absence of my grandson for a couple of weeks until Christmas I will take time out to manufacture the rudders, linkages and scoops from scratch.
    This may be long winded to some but my enjoyment comes from making things even though they are relatively cheap however 2 sets of rudder and scoop will cost ยฃ30 which I can spend on things I canโ€™t make like electrical/electronic items.

    The rudders are very simple to make consisting of a shaped blade made from 1.0mm brass sheet and a piece of 5 mm brass rod. The rod has to have a slot made in the end about 15mm long so the blade can be slotted into it, this I did using a slitting saw in the milling machine but it can be done quite successfully with a new sharp junior hacksaw. The two pieces need to cleaned around the joint area using wire wool, I avoid using abrasive papers to clean before soldering as they tend to leave a residue from the adhesive used to bond the grit which sometimes can cause issues with solder adhesion. So the two parts are clean and a small amount of flux applied we can now apply some heat. For such small jobs I tend to use a small blow torch (the type you use in cooking) this is adequate and soon heats to the point where the solder will melt, itโ€™s important to momentarily remove the heat from the part before you apply the solder, otherwise it melts in the flame and tends to apply too much solder, the solder should melt easily when touched on the joint and run along the joint, a little heat can be further applied to assist in making sure the joint has fully bonded. Hopefully a good joint has been achieved with very little cleaning required of excess solder.
    Now to the plastic support tube, this is made from some black nylon, it consists of a piece of 10 mm bar turned down to 8mm leaving a 2mm shoulder at one end and threaded M8 for about 20 mm, a 5mm hole is then drilled through this little piece can be custom made to suit the boat being built.

    Next I need to make the arms to carry movement from the servo to the rudders again some 1mm bras sheet was used to make 3 identical arms with the same set of holes in each, to make these I first cut three pieces of brass which are over size to finished dimensions, I then drill a single 4 mm hole in the end of each piece, I then put them together and insert a 4 mm drill through each piece, I can now drill the a 1.5mm hole through all the pieces at the other end together, putting a second drill in this hole the pieces can be shaped together, in my case I clamped them in the vice and milled them to size. Holding them together I can now drill the rest of the holes.
    I need some sort of brass bush to include a grub screw for connection to the rudder shaft this is a relatively simple bush which can be soldered into the 4mm hole, one arm is soldered to a single arm using the process described before. The other bush is soldered into the other 2 arms which are set at 90 degrees to each other.
    A trial set up in the bench vice with some connecting rods confirms the system will work. I then tried a mock set up of the water system connecting some of the pipework you may notice each of the silicon tubes have stainless steel spring inside this is so a much tighter curve can be made.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 143 Views
    7
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Twin Rudders and water scoops
    5 months ago by pressonreguardless ( Midshipman)
    Flag
    Beautiful work!!
    Very Clean
    Gives me something to strive for!
    Trev
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 135 Views
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Twin Rudders and water scoops
    5 months ago by stevedownunder ( Commander)
    Flag
    Hi Mike,

    Great description.
    Lovely home made components, as usual.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 141 Views
    2
    ๐Ÿ“ Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    I use Deluxe Materials Fibreglass Cloth 34g-1oz. 1M.Sq and water based resin.
    I used to use the polyester resin which is widely used in GRP (Glass fibre Reinforced Plastic), it is a viscous liquid which, when activated by a suitable catalyst (hardener) will set hard overnight giving a rock hard coating, however for a small model boat the water based resin system is far more suited to this type of work.

    The first job is to give the whole hull a coat of resin which is diluted 50:50 with water; this allows the resin to soak into the wood giving a good bond, when dry after about an hour it can be lightly sanded with a 400 grit to remove any pips. It should be noted that before this process is done the hull must be as near perfect as if it were to be painted because after the glass coating we donโ€™t want to use any filler.

    I like to try and cover the hull in a single piece of glass cloth, which is a challenge even when youโ€™re not trying to work around the already installed prop shafts, so we lay the cloth over the hull and lightly tape it at the bow and stern whilst the cloth is trimmed along the hull sides leaving a good amount spare, the prop shafts have to be accommodated so a cut from the stern to where the prop disappears into the hull is made. At the bow there will be an excess of cloth so again a cut is made to allow the excess to be removed when the resin is applied giving a slight overlap of the cloht but not enough to cause a ridge.
    Now the cloth is draped and prepared we can start to apply the resin, I use a 30mm wide flat Camel Hair brushe which is really fine. We start mid ship along the keel, working out to the sides and back to the stern and forward to the bow cutting any excess away and getting a 3mm overlap along the bow. The resin is applied sparingly avoiding going over the same surface twice, we carry on down the sides carefully flattening any bubbles as you go, donโ€™t be tempted to brush over the surface again a small amount of resin is better at this stage. Although the resin/cloth will be dry in about an hour I leave it to dry overnight before removing the excess cloth around the edges and giving a light sanding and then a second coat can be applied. I gave the hull five coats of resin in all until the weave of the cloth are fully covered rubbing it down between coats leaving the hull ready for painting.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 199 Views
    13
    14
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by Mike Stoney ( Chief Petty Officer 1st Class)
    Flag
    Hello MTurpin!
    Now everything is clear to me after your execution !! Thanks for the good explanation.
    Best regards
    Michel-Claude
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 169 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by Ron ( Rear Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    Eze-Kote is the same, in my opinion, as water-based Varathane, milky in colour, water n soap clean up, low odour, and a can like the one pictured, 946ml, is $18 in Canada. EZY Coat 500 ml, at the hobby store was $25 and not always available.

    One more thought about the water based Varathane, it is available in Gloss, Semi-Gloss and Low Sheen. It is the only product allowed in many of our High School wood shops because of its low odour, itโ€™s water cleaning capacity.

    Polyester products use Varsol cleaning of brushes, they create odours not always appreciated by other classrooms and some are allergic to these fumes. Plus it is a big No No to put these products down the sink drains into the sewer system!

    So, water based products have become the norm. They are more expensive, and in some applications, less durable, but far less of an environment issue.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 175 Views
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by pressonreguardless ( Midshipman)
    Flag
    Thank You!
    In my years of working with full sized boats: Polyester for fiberglass, Epoxy for wood,
    This is a true revelation for me!!
    Trev
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 181 Views
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    Hi Ron your right, with a keel I would go for a 2 piece covering if possible and a further stern piece. My thought being that as little overlap is the best method. Your comment about overlapping brought to mind using heavier stranded cloth when glassing into a mould, when it is the preferred method and the surface finish isn't a requirement as the mould gives the smooth finish.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 184 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    Fibre glass by its very construction is a woven cloth and as such doesn't require to be overlapped since the weave gives it its strength, this of course may be necessary if you are working around a part that requires cutting or patching. You could if you wanted a stronger shell use a heavier cloth or give it a second covering but having to use filler on overlapped lips seems to be counter productive
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 184 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    Deluxe Materials Eze Kote Finishing Resin 500ml S-SE51 ยฃ19.50
    Laminating and finishing resin for balsa and foam models. Eze-Kote is a 1-part water based foam-safe, low odour, resin alternative to epoxy. Brush onto balsa and light glass cloth to create a tough, ding and fuel resistant film that can be sanded easily and painted after 20-30 mins.

    Features

    Easy sanding
    Low odour
    Foam safe
    Water clean-up
    Coverage:

    75ml covers approx. 1m2 per coat
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 184 Views
    4
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by Ron ( Rear Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    I can see trying to do the model in one piece of cloth as it has no raised keel, but another vessel with a keel would require a different method.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 191 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by pressonreguardless ( Midshipman)
    Flag
    Hi Ron,
    You set the cloth with the Varathane?
    Thanks,
    Trev
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 189 Views
    1
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by Ron ( Rear Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    Interesting how you take on the challenge of glassing the hull. When I do mine boats, it is done with multiple strips, overlapping, and when dry, lightly sanded. I use a auto body filler if needed which is how I was taught. Then sanded smooth, a couple more coats of clear before painting. I use the water-based product seen in photo, works very well and virtually no odour. Soap and water clean up too.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 190 Views
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by jimdogge ( Chief Petty Officer 1st Class)
    Flag
    Hi Mturpin l did not know about a water based resin and have been very reluctant to use fiber glass or two part epoxy because they are so messy. Thank you for this.
    Stay safe. Jim
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 192 Views
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by Vanya ( Leading Seaman)
    Flag
    I would like to know more about this water based resin please. Can you provide a reference to the brand? I'm in New Zealand but obviously it is non hazardous Im thinking? Thanks.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 191 Views
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by wunwinglo ( Petty Officer 1st Class)
    Flag
    I HAVE USED THIS RESIN AND FOUND IT TO BE EXCELLENT AND EASY TO USE. i had a tug that my father had made in 1953, on which the hull had gone porous. As it was a finished, detailed model , I did not fancy using polyester as it is so bloody messy. Instead , I first gave the hull two coats of resin, inside and out, the exterior well rubbed down. Then it was covered not in glass cloth but heavyweight model aircraft tissue. Suitably rubbed down, it worked a treat and the finished hull looks really good and has remained watertight ever since. The hull was bread and butter construction in obechi.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 197 Views
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by stevedownunder ( Commander)
    Flag
    Hi Mike,
    Lovely explanation, I also haven't heard of a water based resin, good to learn something new.
    The water based resin would be much better to use with your apprentice, fumes from polyester are quite nasty.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 196 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Fibre glassing the hull
    5 months ago by pressonreguardless ( Midshipman)
    Flag
    Nice Glassing job.
    I am familiar with polyester and epoxy resins.
    What is water based resin?
    Thanks,
    Trev
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 200 Views
    1
    ๐Ÿ“ Skinning the hull
    6 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    View All
    The first job is to make sure that all the faces of the bulkheads and stringers are fully smoothed off and that the stringers are trimmed to align with the bulkhead angles. We did this firstly using a small block plane and then finally with a broad piece of MDF with an abrasive glued to it this ensures that any high spots are removed leaving the surface flat and ready to receive the skin. Skills like this take time to learn for an 8 yr old but he will get there eventually, practice makes perfect.
    The first skin to be applied is a bottom one and the keel edge is trimmed to give a perfect fit/alignment along the full length of the keel, when this is achieved we use a 0.5 mm pin to hold the skin in place at the stern/keel end and also one at the bow bulkhead just before it bends around to the front, the whole skin is then clamped in position to make sure that it fits all around its edges. We can now remove all the clamps and pins and apply a bead of epoxy along all surfaces. The two location pins can now be inserted and the clamps applied along its length. Finally we drive home some 0.1mm brass pins at the base of each bulkhead/stringer and also at the top. This is then put aside to cure overnight. Having cured the skin is trimmed back to the stringers ready for the side skins to be applied.
    The process is repeated on the other bottom skin.

    Next we carry out a similar process on the side skins using the abrasive board to smooth any high spots we then pinned the skin using the brass location pins. The only difficult part to join is at the bow where the skins from the stern are overlapped until at the bow they have to change to a butt joint because of the angles. When the join is aligned dry itโ€™s time to apply the epoxy.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comments
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 216 Views
    7
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skinning the hull
    6 months ago by mturpin013 ( Vice Admiral)
    Flag
    The pictures are with excess glue removed and plenty of disposable gloves in the bin.๐Ÿ˜Š
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 209 Views
    2
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skinning the hull
    6 months ago by stevedownunder ( Commander)
    Flag
    Hi Mike,

    I bet your grandson was really happy to see the bottom and sides go on.
    I hope he wasn't like me at that sort of age with more glue on me than the job.
    Great work. ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
    ๐Ÿ‘ Like
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment
    ๐Ÿ‘€ 213 Views
    2
    Show 4 More Posts


    About This Website
    Terms of Service
    Privacy Policy
    Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info