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    nasraf
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    Member No.#713
    Registered๐Ÿ“…3rd Aug 2009
    Last Online๐Ÿ“…6th Jul 2020
    City๐Ÿ“Bristol
    Country๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡งUnited Kingdom
    Genderโ™‚๏ธMale
    Age๐Ÿ‘ถ83
    Posts๐Ÿ’ฌ136
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    Recent Activity
    Liked THE END 17 hours ago
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    Members Harbour
    The Coromandel
    This was the next boat I built, this time from scratch. In my family history search I discovered that my great grandfather had emigrated to New Zealand in 1870 when he went was as a farm worker. He ended up in a small place called Coromandel on the North Island. Auckland was across a big sea inlet and in the days before significant roads, much of the transport was by small steam ships, it was similar in the UK in the Bristol Channel and on the East coast of the USA. Somehow he improved his status by becoming part of the crew of the boat that plied between mainly Coromandel and Auckland. Unfortunately whilst in Auckland when off the boat, he fell into the harbour there and was drowned leaving a wife and by then 5 children. I do not know anything about their subsequent life in N.Z. but they all ended up in Australia and my grandfather became a ships carpenter and roamed the world. On his way he married my paternal grandmother long enough to conceive my father and the continued for a few years to travel the world, before ending up in British Columbia where he married a further two ladies, so at one time he had three wives. With this information I decided to see if I could build a model of the Coromandel. As it turned out there is a book on the history of steam transport in the North Island of New Zealand and there was one picture of the Coromandel in this book and after fair amount of research ( mainly in the Great Britain library here in Bristol ) I finally produced a design for the boat and covered its construction on this site. The model is electrically powered and radio controlled but only had a few sailings as it is more of a historic object now and the salt water in the sailing sites around Bristol does not do models with brass parts a lot of good so it now resides on brackets in my lounge.
    My Fire Boat
    I have been a member of this site for a long time and I thought it was about time I put my boats in the harbour two have existed for a long time particularly the Fire boat that must go back to the early 1960's. The Valsheda has been a project for the last 9 years, this year I hope to finish it. The first one is one of the founders of this site, the Kit built Fire Boat it started long ago with a very small diesel then to glo plug and in is final form electric. I covered its re build on this site some time ago but it looks like the older stuff has gone from the site. The picture is as it is today after years on a shelf in my office.
    Recent Posts
    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: THE END
    17 hours ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Having been away from this admirable web site for a few years doing something else, I have missed following Mike's story in building his Fire Boat. There is probably not a better one built or such a comprehensive blog of the journey to its completion and I can see why it has taken three years to do. He should be very pleased with his achievement and of displaying the art of the engineer, that I fear is being lost with the younger generations, who have not been brought up with meccano and model making with bits of wood and metal.

    Well done from an admirer.
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    ๐Ÿ“ HSL 102 part 3
    5 days ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    After a number of days doing other things and being put off working on the HSL due to finding that a couple of the frames I had cut by estimating the form, these were nos. 2 and 3 from the bow were not of the correct size. This, using quite thick 3 mm ply, made it impossible to bend the material adequately to contact the frames and chine stringers, I have very little experience in building models from scratch, in addition if I had managed to form the ply covering, the shape of the bow would all be wrong.

    Another thing I had wrong was to try and form a too big ply sheet, I had managed to do this for the aft end of the boat where there were no complex curves, but at the bow end this was a failure.

    To some extent I think these problems are due to my idea of building the model from the deck up, if it was just frames with fitted stringers the errors would have been obvious much earlier.

    However as this is a bit of an experimental project and all my frames are already glued to the deck and I did not want throw it away and start again, I decided to bodge it up, hopefully no one noticing when the hull is finished. This has required lots of little packers to be added around the wrong sized frames. It also took me some time before I gave up on trying to fit large plywood panels in the bow area. I have found that strips of 3 mm ply cut in strips of approx. 15 mm wide can be persuaded to follow the curves required to the first frame from the bow. The bow section I intend to do in solid plywood pieces and sand down to the required shape.

    To day I received the two Chinese ESC's that I obtained from Ali Express after the useful advice from jbkiwi. They were very cheap at about ยฃ 10 for the pair including PayPal exchange costs and delivery, but I think I have probably made another mistake in only getting them with a rating of 30A. They took 21 days from ordering to arrival, but I think a lot of this time was due being in customs in the UK.

    I have tested both of them on my motor test set up and I found they got hot quite quickly. I think the motor I have, probably needs at least a 60 amp ESC, I now know where to get one and for the initial work the 30 amp units will be OK.

    As I had my original defective ESC and this had a finned heat sink, I cut the shrink sleeve off half one of the 30 amp units and glued it to the small aluminium plate heat sink that I found under the sleeve material.

    I then ran the motor for 5 minutes at a moderate speed and I would estimate that the sink got to about 50 degrees centigrade using a 3C 2.8 amp hour battery which will be adequate for the early stage of the project.

    It is now back to the drawing board as I have an idea to effectively mount the motor off the prop shaft and thus simplify the motor/prop shaft coupling.

    I have attached some pics of hull build and esc test set up and modified ESC.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Airfix 1/72nd Kit Whaleback MTB
    8 days ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    From the book " the RAF Air Sea Rescue Service 1918 to 86" the correct name for your model is HSL 100 Type Two. Evidently all together 69 were constructed between 1940 and 1942 with the following numbers 122-149, 156-190 and 2546-2551.

    The general term " Whaleback" I find a bit confusing as this title was also used for the Thorneycroft 67 ft. HSL that followed the Type Two, of which a total of 105 were manufactured between 1942 and 1945.

    I am at present trying to scratch build, a HSL 100 Type One 64 ft HSL, but it is going a bit slowly at present at 1/20 th scale.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: AIRBOAT ON A BETTER DAY
    26 days ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi JB

    Very impressed but what happens if it stops working in middle of lake, it does not look like there are many recovery options around site ?

    Ref HSL motor/esc problems thanks to your message, I did not know about Ali Express until you let me have the info, it does not seem to be well advertised in UK. I have now joined and ordered a couple of ESC's from there at a very good price and buying through Paypal makes deal easy and safe. I am not sure how long it will take for them to come.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: HMAFV SEAL
    28 days ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    I rather like your idea of fitting a positional mounting tube for the prop shaft assembly. I think I will do the same for my HSL but only with one shaft, bit too complicated with two and the real boat had three.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: HSL 102
    29 days ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi JB

    Thanks for your comments.

    A not very successful day today having another go at trying to get the esc to run the motor.

    Initially tried with 3 channel FM Tx and Rx could not get any response from motor but could drive ordinary servos through all 3 channels. Had power to ESC from variable power supply most of time between 6 and 7 volts with current monitor current that never went above 100 mA. After messing about for some time the ordinary servos ceased operating, I think the ESC had damaged the 3 channel Rx.

    Reverted to 2 channel Zebra with ordinary servos and this worked OK but did not chance to try motor ESC again so gave up.

    There is no indication on what the input voltage should be on the ESC label only 60 A which I assume is reference to 60 amps. For the short period that I got the motor to run on the previous attempt I measured a current of about 4 amps at 7 volts.

    As I now regard the ESC as a Rx destroyer I do not intend to operate it again.

    The blue covering is shrink sleeve so I cut this off to have a look at what is inside. You cannot see much of what is in the small assy. incorporated in the control loom from the Rx, only three wires in and out, there appears to be 4 IC's on the board with a common metal heat sink attached to them. The main power control has quite a lot of components and is obviously the three power switching channels with an attendant heat sink. ( see pics )

    There is no desperate hurry to get the motor running, as there is a lot of boat building to do. I will see what there is out there that will do the job.
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    ๐Ÿ“ There is life in older rc sets.
    30 days ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    If there is anyone out there who is into collecting old bits of R/C gear, I have a very old MacGregor Digimac 3 Rx. and sevo.

    You can have it for the cost of packing and postage.

    See picture.

    nasraf
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: HSL 102
    30 days ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi PD

    Thanks for the comments, from your picture of the ESC on your comment it looks like the same type as I have, see attached pics.

    I did not realise that they have to be matched to a different Rx, perhaps that is what the second thin blue box does. I changed the Rx during my experiments so that may be the problem.

    I will set the system up again to morrow and have another go.

    I have read a bit more about brush less DC motors and I think you can change direction of rotation like you can on a three phase induction motor by just interchanging any two of the three conductors going to the motor, the supply to the ESC cannot be changed as this is polarity sensitive.

    If it works, in the boat I could fit a relay in the motor lines to do this. It would then be a bit like the real boat and the Napier Sea Lion gearbox set up. The Rttl I had a ride on had sea lions , it is a long time ago when I did it. I can remember poking about on the boat when waiting for the dingy that transferred you from boat to boat when doing the DI's on the VHF radio and looking round the engine room. As the boat was never used, I was the only occupant and can recall the engines each had a great big lever on it, I am not sure if this was the clutch and the reverse gear selector, this function could not not done from the bridge only by the poor engineers in engine compartment. No health and safety concerns in those days !. I can also remember when fiddling about with a co2 fire extinguisher letting one off by accident.
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    ๐Ÿ“ HSL 102
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    After starting the build, as a change of scenery I thought, after finding some of the bits, to see how well the electrical items I had worked, mainly the motor and controller.

    I have had the motor and controller a long time and it came from China. As I had never run it I made up a support jig and mounting and fitted a cut down aircraft prop. to give the motor a bit of loading and to determine direction of rotation.

    I thought that these motors were miniature 3 phase induction motors with the electronics producing a variable frequency three phase supply, thus the three supply conductors, but from the little reading I have done on the subject this appears not to be the case. I think they are basically a switched stator relative to permanent magnets embodied in the rotor. However they can still be reversed like a 3 phase induction motor, by interchanging two conductors.

    After I had made the test rig and got out my now very old Solartron variable DC supply, I gathered up my odd assortment of radio gear to test and drive the motor speed controller.

    First one tried and technically the best, a 5 channel Spektrum Dx5 transmitter and AR600 receiver. Failed to get this one binded so gave up. Then put together a simple 3 channel Zebra unit, with this I could control the motor and run a couple of servos. Was quite pleased and when I reversed two connecting conductors the motor changed direction. Unfortunately this situation did not last very long and the motor ceased functioning, there had not been any significant load applied and nothing got hot to the touch. I have read that these Chinese controllers are not very reliable, so I am looking for suggestions on what to replace it by.

    I have added a couple of pictures of the the test set up, it will be back to woodwork to morrow.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: HSL 102
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thanks JB for advice and further offers of help when I get nearer to doing the detail stuff on the deck.

    I have had a bit of a technical day to day, see latest bog update, not very successful.

    As you can see I have a 1000v out runner motor which is quite nicely made, but I think now, no motor controller.

    As I am unlikely to be a great sailer of the boat, I think I will stick with one motor and take your advice on prop positioning.

    Unfortunately as far as selling is concerned the Super 60 has been built, so no kit form.
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    ๐Ÿ“ HSL 102
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thanks to the inspiration of jbkiwi and the purser with their models of the early Royal Air Force High Speed Launches I have decided to have a go at one. jbkiwi sent me some out line drawings and an indication of the boat cross sections and stations.

    From this I produced some drawings of a model 1 metre long and have got started. As I have found a R/C transmitter and receiver that was intended for the Valsheda and some servos I now intend to make it a model to sail. I have also found an out runner motor a ESC that I once intended to use on Kiel Kraft Super 60 that has laid in my loft for the last 55 years, not likely now I shall ever fly it.

    I am using a bit of an experimental build process. I have made a base for the build from some 3/4 inch plywood stiffened by a couple of pieces of steel square section. On to this I have laid a sheet of 3 mm ply which will form the deck of the launch, when the structure is complete I will cover the deck with strip decking. Hopefully I will sheet the sides of the hull with 3 mm ply, if it will bend enough, the bottom of the hull I may plank as it may be a bit curvy for sheeting.

    Did very well so far for most of the materials, got the plywood base and a big bit of 3 mm ply as off cuts from a ply wood stockist for ยฃ 5, my one bit of hardwood section from B & Q cost nearly as much. Nice surprise in B & Q this morning, I wanted some small wood screws and I came across open bins where you can pick and mix, and you pay by the packet, I had a small one at ยฃ 2.50 and you can get a very large number of 1/2 and 3/4 inch small screws for your money.

    I have now assembled most of the details of the hull structure, at present only held together with screws and rubber bands. I also use a length of 6 mm threaded rod and nuts to hold the frames in position during the build. When I am happy with things I will glue it together.

    I have attached a couple of pictures of the assembly so far.

    How big a prop. should I use, I do not want to go very fast and I expect the motor is more powerful than I need but I can not turn the throttle up too far.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: RNZAF W1, a 64ft BPBC High Speed Launch
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi redpmg.

    Whilst I agree in general with your comments, I tend to think, particularly with the great difficulty in the museum environment with the " Arts graduate " professional curators, that are such a bane to anyone who has any technical background running the show. On balance I would much prefer to keep the original prime movers in place. In particular the Napier sea lion installations must have been an appalling environment to work in, especially in a small boat going quite quickly and it is a pity to lose this part of history, just to enable he boat to be operated in an attempt to bring in some income. If you want to go fast on water, use a modern boat.

    I have spent the last six years working in Aerospace Bristol where our industrial heritage has been destroyed by these new people who have no idea what engineering is about and their attempts to enthuse young people in education to join the profession, makes us old ones cringe.

    They also have a great ability to spend money, on things that are not needed. In our case they have spent ยฃ2.5 million we did not have, mainly on their salaries. It looks like the Covid virus will finish us off and we will loose all the exhibits that I have had a working history with and the active and knowledgeable volunteers are too old to start again.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: H.s.l. High speed launch
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thanks very much for the information on the aerial construction and function and your pics. of various HSL 100s.

    Other than my fairly brief connection with R/T things, during my National Service in the early 1960's, I have never been involved with this area of technology.

    I do have a fairly vivid recollection of a job I had when I was sent from RAF Mount Batten to a remotely sited Pinnace at Tenby South Wales. It was thought that the 1154 transmitter was defective as the radio operator could not contact Mount Batten on the H/F system. I was provided with a station wagon and driver plus a spare 1154 and we set off. In those days there was no bridge over the Bristol channel, so it was a long way via Gloucester. The driver managed to knock a cyclist off his bike in Bristol when we were making a detour for me to see my girl friend, so this worried me for some weeks, as I thought someone would have inquired why we were in that part of Bristol, but no more came of it.

    Eventually, after we had spent the night trying to sleep in the vehicle in the Brecon Beacons, we arrived at the small jetty and simple building, that is still there today, where the boat crew lived. It was quite a nice place to be in the holiday season and the boat did not have much to do. I knew very little about the 1154/1155 system as on our course at Yatesbury we were told we would never see one in use and at Mount Batten their function was not tested on the DI's. I did know that on the RTTL's when you powered up the transmitter there was virtually no current shown on the Ae. current meter. I got the radio operator to show me what happened when he tried to transmit and the meter showed some movement, so I asked to try and contact the base station which he did, there was no fault with the system just his lack of faith and the fact that very little power was being fed into the aerial. He was a bit embarrassed by this, so I agreed that I would put it down to an aerial fault and we said I had replaced the aerial, which was only a bit of wire.

    This experience has now stayed with me for nearly sixty years and why when thinking about building a model of an HSL 100 the aerial configuration is of interest and when I see a picture on TV of the jetty at Tenby, which is surprisingly often, I am reminded of my trip and experience.

    Another interesting point, whilst producing this message, I had a look on e bay and there is a 1154/1155 combination for sale there at ยฃ 3,500 ! It pays to keep some old things.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: H.s.l. High speed launch
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi Purser

    Thanks very much for the details of your hull build.

    I think like you, I might have a combination of sheeting and planking with a bit of solid stuff at the bow.

    My initial thoughts are to make a metric HSL 100 i.e. metre long and all internals in mm. I am not sure if it will be a static model or to make it sail but basically for the initial build to allow either.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: H.s.l. High speed launch
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi Purser

    Very interested in your impressive HSL 100. I am intending to build one but mine will take a lot longer than yours. I was once a RAF National Service man at Mount Batten in 1961, bit after your 103 was about, but was involved on the radio systems used on the boats.

    I have had some advice from JB in New Zealand as he has built a model of a version that ended up there. He has supplied me some drawings of the boat, I do not know if you have any drawings of your model in particular the frames ?

    Did you plank your model or sheet plywood ?

    I am rather interested in the complexity of the radio aerial fitted to the boat, I wonder why it was like it was.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: RNZAF W1, a 64ft BPBC High Speed Launch
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi JB

    Thanks very much for the drawings I will scale them off and produce some drawings myself, they tend to be on a number of sheets, as my drawing board these days is not very big. The main part will be the frames and positions which are all shown. I shall take a bit of licence with some of the curvature on the sections to simplify the outer surfaces.

    I was interested to see on the drawing the complexity of the radio aerial, I wonder what the radio system was in 1938. When I was at Mount Batten (1961) the HF radio ( 1154/1155 ) fitted very old WW2 compared with that used in aircraft of the time. On our training course all we were shown on it was how to switch it on and off, being told that we would never see it in service. Luckily we had a civilian in the workshop who knew something about them and sorted any problems.

    Now researching the HSL 100 class, I have found there is a restored one (102 ) at the Portsmouth Naval Base Trust in Portsmouth, so as soon as we have some hotels open in the UK I intend to make a trip down there and get some photographs.

    It is evidently an active restoration and some times gives trips, but unfortunately ( in my view ) it has had the 3 Napier Sea Lions taken out and replaced by a pair of modern diesels. I think for historical reasons things should be restored as they were built originally, or at least only done in such a way that the changes can be rectified later. From my recent reading of the history of the prime movers of RAF launches this was a very major problem in all of them, which should not be expunged from exhibits.

    When I worked for a living I was responsible for the design of the electrical power generating units for the Rapier missile system, so have quite a lot of experience of problems of i.c. engines in military use.

    Brian
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: RNZAF W1, a 64ft BPBC High Speed Launch
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi JB

    After you had encouraged me to get into researching the Royal Air Force marine craft I have come to the conclusion of all the boats it had, in historical terms and ease of build this would be a project I might have a go at, to compliment my fireboat. In many ways the FB although it is a very popular model it was not a significant class of boat and only two were built and as far as I am aware were never used significantly in service.

    The HSL 100 Type 1 was the successor to the Type ST 200 that Lawrence of Arabia was significantly involved with and is consequently of more historically of interest to me.

    In your notes on your model you say it was scratch built, I wonder if by chance you have any frame drawings of your hull.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: New Mast
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thanks Roy for your detailed comments.

    My main aim really is to make a decorative model which is approximately like the real thing.

    As I have no detail information on the boat as she was originally built, my model is based on what it looked like in 2015.

    I found out that the Valsheda was in Southampton in mid 2015 so one Saturday I drove down there and was able to take quite a lot of pictures, which I am now using for guidance on the build.

    As a decorative model set up at slightly above eye level even for tall people, it is unlikely that many will ever see the deck or for that matter most of the deck furniture, but there is some satisfaction in making the bits and pieces and you can put pictures on this web site.

    The main bits that will show are the mast, boom, rigging and sails so that is the reason I want to make the mast more like the real thing than the original arrangements for a functional model.

    I am hopeful that the mast will not be too far away from the real thing, the rigging ( which is complex ) is more difficult in particular with its attachments so these will not be like the real thing.

    On the initial build I only got so far with the sail manufacture when I gave up, I am not sure what I shall do for this version, hopefully I shall get some guidance from fellow members who have done it before.

    I have attached a couple of pictures of the mast details particularly of the attachment of the boom to the mast and as there will be no significant loads on the model it may be possible to make it much nearer to scale.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: New Mast
    1 month ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thanks for the responses.

    The original scheme I had for the Valsheda used a bit of fishing rod for the mast but it was a long way from the shape and size of the real thing. I have had a look on e bay for suitable pre made sections but none of them look much like the actual boat and the top part tapers . One of my other problems with the new mast is that it is 1.17 metres long and most suppliers seem to sell it in shorter lengths than this and delivery would no doubt be a problem, I am also trying to make the mast as possible to scale.

    I like a bit of experimental work and I thought this was something new and it may interest other members of this great site, that has developed from its beginnings as a home for the builders of the kit built fireboat. I am a bit of a sporadic contributor and every time I come back I am impressed by its development, someone somewhere is doing a good job.

    As the model is going to be static and consequently not subject to any great loading my main aim is to make something that will keep geometrically accurate. I hope that timber reinforced by carbon fibre may be a way to achieve this.
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    ๐Ÿ“ New Mast
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    I have not got very far with the detail of how to make a carbon fibre encased timber mast.

    I was going to try and enclose the timber core with a tubular sleeve of carbon fibre but I have not had any luck in finding it in this form and it would be very expensive that way.

    Now thinking of either just sticking a woven strip down each side of a basically rectangular section or trying to have a wider strip of carbon fibre tape and folding round the leading edge of the mast and sticking the folded back parts to the sides.

    I have never had any experience with woven carbon and I do not know how well it folds. The most available material available is at 200 gms, per meter sq.

    Is there any advice out there.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: The Coromandel
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thanks JB

    I thought you would know the details and the number on the boat is genuine.

    After doing this bit of research I came across a book " The RAF Airsea Rescue Service 1918 to 1986 " and have bought a copy via Amazon, as my detailed knowledge on the great variety of boats the RAF had, is a bit sparse.

    When I was at Mountbatten 1961 to 1962, I was an air wireless fitter, the boats were fitted with aircraft radios. We had 3 types of boats there then RTTL's, RSL's and Pinnance's the main daily task being to check the function of the VHF set. If you planned the time you did it, you could have a ride on a RSL outside of the breakwater and be a spectator of aircrew doing dingy drill.

    I only had two rides on a RTTL, once on a nuclear exercise on a MK 2 which consisted of a short trip across the sound and then to stay anchored whilst the boat rocked from side to side for about 8 hours, I managed to not be sick, but was very glad when we returned to the Cattewater.

    The second was on probably the last MK 1 RTTL still at Mount Batten, I expect the 1A which had 3 Napier Lion engines controlled by some poor soul who had to be in close proximity. It was a very nice day and we had gone for about 5 miles outside the breakwater on a flat sea, when one of the engines packed up, so we had to go back. My sea experience therefore on fast boats was very limited. I think the Mk 1A was kept at the time for historical reasons, it was never used on operations.

    In the end I became the unit electrical draughtsman, because beside being an operational station it was also the Maintenance Unit for the RAF marine craft, and we fitted equipment to the boats without contractors. The main job I had was recording the fitting of UHF radios to a RTTL for location of submarine sensing devices. It was a much more comfortable job sitting in a nice warm private office, rather than making your way round various boats anchored out in the Cattewater in the winter and trying to start the single cylinder donkey engine on the RSL's, for the radio check.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: The Coromandel
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi JB

    Your response has got me into a bit of research into your 63 ft. HSL which looks a very fine model indeed.

    I am not very well informed on the early RAF boats but have in the past been interested in T.E. Lawrence ( Lawrence of Arabia ) involvement with the development of the high speed launch, that he was intimately associated with at RAF Mountbatten.

    Do you know much about the history of the boat you have modeled, was it originally a RAF boat that got transferred to the NZ air force ?

    From what I am able to deduce your model is based on the RAF 100 HSL Type 2 that were built by the British Power Boat Company am I correct.

    Over the last 7 years I have been very involved in the development of an aerospace museum here in Bristol in particularly in the area of guided weapons, this has made me much more aware of the importance trying to record some of the history of what happened. Model makers do great deal to record history, particularly when the original items have disappeared.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Mast for the Valsheda
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    I am about to make the mast for the VALSHEDA I am building, it started as an active sailing model, but has evolved into a static display one.

    Originally it had a mast made from a fishing rod section, as it did not matter much what it looked like, now I want to have one that resembles the original.

    My idea is to make a core from timber and encase it in a carbon fibre woven tube.

    Has anyone out there made one before, I look for some guidance as I expect the carbon fibre material will be quite expensive, so I do not want to have to do it more than once.

    I have attached a couple of pictures of the real thing.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: The Coromandel
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Hi jbkiwi

    Thanks for the response, interested where you are sited have thought about traveling to see where the family came from, but it is a long way at my age.

    The actual picture I used to design and build the model was from a book called "Servants of the North". The copy I have was via Amazon and was evidently presented to someone from the Birmingham Chamber of Industry and Commerce on a visit to Auckland in 1982.

    I have attached the picture, sorry it is upside down, but I tried to rotate it but although I can do it on my computer for some reason when I down load it to the model boat site, it goes back to its original form perhaps it is because it comes from the other side of the world !!!!

    I am only a very occasional modeler, only three boats in my life and I doubt if there will be any more after the VALSHEDA, not like you.

    The research for the Coromandel was very interesting and I learnt a lot about the very large industry that small coastal steamers were at the end of the 19 th century. In Bristol where I live is the home to the SS Great Britain and associated with it is a very good marine library which was the source of the hull shape.

    nasraf

    P.S.

    I was once a National Service member of the Royal Air Force hence the name. The branch I served in was the marine craft station at Plymouth UK so have a particular interest in the Fireboat due to its connections. This was in 1960 when the branch was gradually fading away.
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    ๐Ÿ“ At Last some Progress
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    After another long delay with the Lock In in progress and the Aero Collection in a state of failure I at last got up enough enthusiasm to start the manufacture of the 21 winches required for the VALSHEDA, the warm weater in my cold garage helped. In three days I have done the majority of the hard work in making them from solid brass. Later I intend to work out the final details of the tops and to have them either nickel or chrome plated.

    Another job I did not want to do was to lengthen the boom as the conversion from toy boat to display model required changing the rigging and mast position.

    I still have some detail work to do on the deck houses, the next big job is the new mast and where possible incorporation of the wire work supporting the mast.

    Attached is a picture as it is today with winches temporarily fitted, they all screw on with M6 threads into bushes in the deck.
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    ๐Ÿ“ The Coromandel
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    This was the next boat I built, this time from scratch.

    In my family history search I discovered that my great grandfather had emigrated to New Zealand in 1870 when he went was as a farm worker. He ended up in a small place called Coromandel on the North Island. Auckland was across a big sea inlet and in the days before significant roads, much of the transport was by small steam ships, it was similar in the UK in the Bristol Channel and on the East coast of the USA. Somehow he improved his status by becoming part of the crew of the boat that plied between mainly Coromandel and Auckland. Unfortunately whilst in Auckland when off the boat, he fell into the harbour there and was drowned leaving a wife and by then 5 children. I do not know anything about their subsequent life in N.Z. but they all ended up in Australia and my grandfather became a ships carpenter and roamed the world. On his way he married my paternal grandmother long enough to conceive my father and the continued for a few years to travel the world, before ending up in British Columbia where he married a further two ladies, so at one time he had three wives.

    With this information I decided to see if I could build a model of the Coromandel. As it turned out there is a book on the history of steam transport in the North Island of New Zealand and there was one picture of the Coromandel in this book and after fair amount of research ( mainly in the Great Britain library here in Bristol ) I finally produced a design for the boat and covered its construction on this site.

    The model is electrically powered and radio controlled but only had a few sailings as it is more of a historic object now and the salt water in the sailing sites around Bristol does not do models with brass parts a lot of good so it now resides on brackets in my lounge.
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    ๐Ÿ“ My Fire Boat
    2 months ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    I have been a member of this site for a long time and I thought it was about time I put my boats in the harbour two have existed for a long time particularly the Fire boat that must go back to the early 1960's.

    The Valsheda has been a project for the last 9 years, this year I hope to finish it.

    The first one is one of the founders of this site, the Kit built Fire Boat it started long ago with a very small diesel then to glo plug and in is final form electric. I covered its re build on this site some time ago but it looks like the older stuff has gone from the site.

    The picture is as it is today after years on a shelf in my office.
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    ๐Ÿ“ RE ads90's Vosper Firefloat
    2 years ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    It is a little while ago since this subject was raised but I came across it to day whilst passing my time looking through this continuingly interesting web site, but for what it is worth I will outline a bit I know about the RAF marine branch.

    I was one of the last National Service RAF enlisted men and started my service 5 th April 1960. I was then trained as an Air Wireless Fitter at Yatesbury and on passing the reqired tests was posted to RAF Mountbatten in May 1961, this was sited on the coastline of Plymouth Sound and the marine craft were moored on the Cattewater.

    Not long before I got there, the main base for the RAF Marine activities was on the I. of W. at Calshot but the decision had been made, due to the great contraction of the marine arm, as helicopters had taken over the rescue task and the loss in interest in aircraft operating from water, the MU ( Maintenance Unit ) was moved to the operational station at Plymouth.

    Mountbatten was quite busy with various activities and it was the H.Q. of Coastal Command the other activities was in providing targets for Shackelton training, dingy drill for aircrew and survival training for aircrew on Dartmoor.

    All the useful marine craft were moved to Plymouth and I would imagine things like Fire Floats would have been disposed of prior to the move. All that was at Mountbatten were RTTL's of various standards, RSL's and Pinnance's. The only strange item was an old Rescue Launch which was powered by 3 Napier Lion engines, all the later RTTLs had Rolls Royce Merlin derivatives.

    This was the only large boat that I ever had a fast ride on, but unfortunately we were only a few miles out of the Sound when one of the engines failed and we had to limp home. I never had a fast trip on a RTTL. I used to have lots of trips outside the breakwater on RSL's on RAF crew dingy drill, when the pilot under training had to jump off the boat with his uninflated dingy and when the RSL made as many waves as possible he had to inflate it and climb in whilst the launch continued to rough the sea up as much as possible. He then stayed in his dingy for about 45 minutes which was not very pleasant in winter.
    It was for us lesser mortals an enjoyable spectator sport to see commissioned officers undergoing sme discomfort.

    I think that all the odd marine equipment was lost when Calshot closed.

    sub
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    ๐Ÿ“ What type of wire?
    3 years ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    I am not sure from your original question if you were asking about sizing of conductors or on which type of conductor/insulation was the most suitable.

    The previous contributors have covered the size issue and here are a few thoughts on other features.

    From your comments it looked to me you were interested in having wiring in models you wanted to be around for a long time which is quite likely. I think my fireboat is over 50 years old now and is still stuck to gether with the original glue, but has had a number of up dates to its internals from very messy diesel to brushed dc motors.

    Most reasonably priced wiring is made from copper or tin coated copper wire if you need to do a lot of soldering, with pvc insulation, if pvc is irradiated this gives it a longer life. As far as I can see from my house wiring, so long as it is not flexed, ordinary pvc insulation lasts a long time, but does become brittle.

    In the defence/aerospace business since the second world war there have been various exotic systems used ( up until the end of the war rubber was the general insulator which did not last very long until it perished ). Various ones being silicone rubber internal insolators covered with glass fibre woven covers, this is horrible stuff to deal with when stripping, vynel with a woven nylon covering being another.

    With the advent of irradiated pvc and ptfe these were totally replaced.

    Ptfe is a very good insulator and is very stable and not attacked by any common liquids or solvents. Due to its good insulating properties the thickness of casing can be very thin, the problem with it is it is difficult to strip so you have to have a good pair of strippers.

    Another option in a model boat installation would be to use varnised copper wire like that used in various electrical items, solenoids, transformers etc. then stick this down on to a bed of epoxy resin and then add an extra coat, a bit like a fitted p.c.b. I have never done it but if it was well done could look quite interesting.

    If the radio side is a major consideration the above is not very applicable as, as has been said by others the choice is largely decided by the equipment you acquire.

    glue
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    ๐Ÿ“ Li-Poly batteries
    3 years ago by nasraf ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    The link to rchelicopters.com that pmdevlin has indicated I found very informative and I think should be read by all those using lipo's. in addition if they follow its recommendations is likely to save them a lot of money as to the life they will get out of their batteries.

    One thing I discovered was the meaning of the two "c" values shown on the batteries which from what previous contributors have said looks a bit confused.

    From the web site article the lower of the two numbers is the maximum charge rate that can be applied to the battery without causing its immediate destruction i.e. assuming a capacity of 1000 ma.hrs and a "c" of 5, 5 amps would be the absolute maximum charging current. However if this rate is used the number of charging cycles that can be done before the battery is seriously damaged would be greatly reduced. The author of the article recommends that the rate should never exceed 1 c if you want to get a good life.

    The higher "c" rating is in general better understood and is an indication of the maximum short term discharge rate that can be drawn. Going back to an example of a 1000 ma.hr battery a "c" of 25 would give a discharge current of of 25 amps but not for long and the internal battery heating would not do much for the battery life.

    lipo
    web site
    battery life
    batteries
    show
    lipo charge
    battery
    money back
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