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    19

















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    Gaff Rigged Pilot Cutter
    by Graham93 ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง ( Captain)
    ๐Ÿ“ฃ










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    14 Posts 120 Comments 0 Photos 150 Likes
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    ๐Ÿ“ Skylight
    3 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    The plans do not include any details for the construction of a skylight, but most photos I've seen of Cutters show a skylight over the central hatch so I decided to add one.

    A rectangular frame, the same size as the center hatch was first constructed from mahogany. (sorry forgot to take a photo!). The two opening skylights were also constructed from mahogany by holding the pieces in position on a strip of wide masking tape and then gluing the joints with superglue.

    To drill holes in the support rails for the glazing bars, a simple jig was made using a piece of stripboard. Pins fitted in the stripboard hold the prepared support rails in position so that the glazing bar holes can be drilled using the stripboard holes as guides. The drilled glazing bars were threaded into lengths of 1.2mm stainless steel welding rod. The glazing bar assemblies were then glued to the skylights. The glazing bar support rails overlapping the butt joints in the skylights and reinforcing them. The two completed skylights were then glued to the (previously not photographed) frame. Small recesses were cut to house brass 'hinges'.

    To attach the completed skylight assembly to the hatch cover, small brass link plates were cut and drilled. I found photos on-line showing this method of fixing for skylights. Another stripboard jig was used to assist with drilling the holes. Small brass rivets through the holes in the fixing plates hold the sylight on top of the hatch.

    Finally the hatch was primed with grey primer and brass handles added to the skylights. The hatch will eventually be painted white and the skylight will be varnished. Glazing will be added to the underside of the skylight after varnishing and before the skylight is permanently attached to the hatch.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Absolutely brilliant Graham I love to see a jig being used, it improves the accuracy of the finished piece
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Re - Then I thought, โ€œdonโ€™t be silly, the sun rarely seems to shine here in the North Westโ€๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿคฃ

    Give me a yell when you're ready Graham and I'll post some up๐Ÿ˜‚, you'd have to use it before winter though๐Ÿ˜ Peter can send some from SA as well (might be stronger๐Ÿ˜‚)

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Hi Phil,

    I wouldnโ€™t rush to charge the GoPro. โ˜น๏ธ Canโ€™t see us getting back to the Pavillion Gardens much before mid summer- and thatโ€™s me being optimistic. Gives me plenty of time to get on with this build ๐Ÿ˜€.

    Stay safe, hope to see you soon.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Colin, JB,

    You got me thinking there for a few minutes about solar panels. Then I thought, โ€œdonโ€™t be silly, the sun rarely seems to shine here in the North Westโ€๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿคฃ

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks Hammer,

    This model has three removable hatches, plus the removable cabin roof, so there should be good access to all the gear under the deck. Good job as there is going to be quite a bit to fit in.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by philcaretaker ( Lieutenant)
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    Hope all well Graham, let me know when to charge up the gopro !๐Ÿ‘โ›ต๐Ÿ˜‹
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by hammer ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    The reason the punt has to fit on deck. So no room for hatch. A hatch makes life a lot easier on a model & no need to make the punt. In photo the westerman stearin & waves. Als a deck light can be seen. You are making an excellent job of yourโ€™s
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by hammer ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I wanted to say very nice. But lost post
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by hammer ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I believe Cutters in a working condition would not have a hatch. Relying on deck light to illuminate the cabin. Only when sold on for private use where hatches added.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    That's not a silly idea Colin,- small ones as used in solar path lights etc? They will charge 2 AA NiMH batteries ok on a sunny day and come complete with the charging board.

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Extra nice Graham!๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘ (as usual) Clever drilling idea as well!

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by Colin H ( Rear Admiral)
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    Super detailing, you could replace the false glass with solar panels to keep your batteries topped up.
    Cheers Colin.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Skylight
    3 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Very nice neat work Graham.
    I like the way you even made the small cutouts for the false hinges.
    Keep it up.

    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Constructing the Cabin
    7 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    The cabin walls were cut from birch ply and the surfaces which will remain visible once assembled were veneered with mahogany. A coping saw was used to cut grooves into the mahogany to represent planking. The holes in the side panels are for portholes which will be fitted later. Once the four walls were prepared, they were stained to represent a darker mahogany and then glued to the deck.

    Two oak posts were added to the rear of the cabin to support a stainless steel rail. This will have eventually have a traveller looped around it to which the main sheet will be attached. The oak posts pass through the deck so that they can be braced underneath.

    Using a similar technique as used earlier for making the hatches, masking tape and cling film were used to provide a 'paint clearance' and glue barrier before the frame for the cabin roof was assembled in situ. Once the glue was set, the framework was carefully removed and a cabin roof of 1.6mm ply was glued to the frame. The next step was build the companionway on the cabin roof. This was constructed from 3mm mahogany cut to shape as shown on the plan. The pieces were tacked into position with superglue and then a fillet of waterproof pva run into all the joints from the inside. The plan calls for the companionway roof to be cut from thin ply but I decided it would look better constructed from mahogany planks. Thin (0.5mm) black plasticard was used between the planks to represent caulking.

    Four holes were cut in the ply roof for roof lights (would these still be referred to as 'portholes?). The circular frames were turned on the lathe from a piece of thick walled aluminium tube salvaged from a defunct greenhouse window opener. These will be glazed, once the slowboat from China arrives ๐Ÿ™„.

    A few small trim pieces were added to represent the door into the cabin. The hinges and door knob are still to be added (not functional ๐Ÿ˜ฎ)

    Finally, to hold the roof in position, two brass pins were added to the roof hatch framework. These locate into corresponding holes in the cabin end panel. At the opposite end of the roof, a bent stainless steel clip fits through holes in the end wall and the roof frame to lock the roof in position. A similar fixing method will be used for the other hatches.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    3 days ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    " Perhaps they should have been portholes and starboard holes๐Ÿ˜‚"
    Or Port holes and Underway or High seas holes JB ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿคฃ
    BTW Side lights to me are the small running lights on a car and scuttles are covers to close off portholes and other openings to protect them and prevent ingress of water in heavy seas.
    Also associated with openings to allow water to drain off the deck - origin of 'scuttlebutt' perhaps?
    Scuttle is apparently known as a synonym for porthole - never heard it in that context myself though.
    "Scuttlebutt in slang usage means rumor or gossip, deriving from the nautical term for the cask used to serve water (or, later, a water fountain)."

    "Etymology
    According to the Navy Department Library, the word "porthole" has nothing to do with its location on the port side of a ship, but originated during the reign of Henry VII of England (1485). The king insisted on mounting guns too large for his ships and therefore the conventional methods of securing the weapons on the forecastle and aftcastle could not be used. A French shipbuilder named James Baker (?) was commissioned to solve the problem, which he did by piercing the ship's sides so the cannon could be mounted inside the fore and aft castles. For heavy weather and when the cannons were not in use, the openings were fitted with covers, that were called porte in French, meaning "door". "Porte" was Anglicized to "port" and later corrupted to porthole. Eventually, it came to mean any opening in a ship's side whether for cannon or not."

    " porthole, sometimes called bull's-eye window or bull's-eye, is a generally circular window used on the hull of ships to admit light and air. Though the term is of maritime origin, it is also used to describe round windows on armoured vehicles, aircraft, automobiles (the Ford Thunderbird a notable example) and even spacecraft.
    On a ship, the function of a porthole, when open, is to permit light and fresh air to enter the dark and often damp below-deck quarters of the vessel. It also affords below-deck occupants a limited view to the outside world. When closed, the porthole provides a strong water-tight, weather-tight and sometimes light-tight barrier.
    A porthole on a ship may also be called a sidescuttle or side scuttle (side hole), as officially termed in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. This term is used in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. It is also used in related rules and regulations for the construction of ships. The use of the word "sidescuttle" instead of "porthole" is meant to be broad, including any covered or uncovered hole in the side of the vessel."
    ๐Ÿ˜Ž
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    3 days ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Great documentation and pictures, a blog is all the more interesting for the effort taken, The quality of the build has been excellent as have all your other builds.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    5 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    I must be getting slow Graham๐Ÿ˜‚. Probably not a bad idea making it watertight, thought my Optimist was till I put it through some 'heavy weather' in the sea. It's watertight up to the top of the coamings, but leaked round the roof edges, (sort of labyrinth seal but it didn't stop it getting in).

    Looked it up, (Glossary of old terms for marine surveyors) and 'Portholes' in the roof are apparently called skylights, and on the sides they are port lights, side lights or side scuttles (not portholes as everyone calls them,- apparently not a 'proper' nautical term),- who knew? (or really cared ) not me๐Ÿ˜ Perhaps they should have been portholes and starboard holes๐Ÿ˜‚

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    5 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    JB,

    No. Decided against a sliding hatch this time. Trying to make sure it is watertight, as far as I can. No working hinges on the cabin doors either. Surprised you didnโ€™t pick up on that as well๐Ÿ˜‚

    Like those catches. Havenโ€™t come across those before.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    5 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    WOT, no sliding hatch!? you're slipping Graham๐Ÿ˜‚, but very nice all the same๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘.

    Re hatch fastening, - I have used these Carl Goldberg 464 angled clips for plane hatches, and they were brilliant (unfortunately discontinued). They are completely hidden and hold really firmly. You can use them in a number of different ways. If you ever see any on Ebay etc, well worth grabbing, very useful for any hatch type. The 463s would be just as good (also discontinued)โ˜น๏ธ It would be easy enough to copy something in nylon etc. (In the second pic, the small arched strip (like the top of a Scottish thistle) is removed to make a push on clip, - as per no 2 use in pic 4)

    (just looked, - a bunch on ebay in US now, so they are still 'find-able')

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    5 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Doug,

    Still have plenty of magnets available ๐Ÿ˜†

    The plan suggests this way of securing the hatches so I thought Iโ€™d try it. Three of the four hatches will not need to be removed unless for repair or modifications. The hatches will certainly be secure this way. I would hate to loose one when she is heeled over. ๐Ÿ˜ 

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    6 days ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    "Finally, to hold the roof in position, two brass pins were added to the roof hatch framework. These locate into corresponding holes in the cabin end panel. At the opposite end of the roof, a bent stainless steel clip fits through holes in the end wall and the roof frame to lock the roof in position. A similar fixing method will be used for the other hatches. "

    WHAT?๐Ÿ˜ฎ Run out of mini magnets Graham??๐Ÿ˜
    Seriously though folks! More stunning woodworking, love it.๐Ÿ˜
    Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    6 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Looking really good Graham.
    Keep it up.

    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Constructing the Cabin
    7 days ago by stevedownunder ( Midshipman)
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    Lovely work Graham.

    Cheers,
    Stpehen.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Weathering the Deck
    11 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    The lime planks I used for the deck are mostly a pale creamy yellow colour, but some of them have a grey tint. Looking at photos of the deck on real boats, they mostly look a weathered grey colour. I wasn't too happy with the patchy colour of my deck so decided to try weathering it.

    A bit of internet research turned up a solution which can be used to weather timber. A piece of fine wire wool is immersed in white vinegar for a while, and the resulting liquid, when applied to the deck, should turn the planks grey. The longer the solution is made up before use, the more pronounced the effect. As I wasn't sure on the appropriate timings, I made up a test piece of decking to try it out. The solution was applied in patches to the test piece at timed intervals of 30, 45, 90 and 180 minutes. As you can see from the photo, it isn't too critical how long you leave it, so long as you don't leave it too long ๐Ÿ˜Š. The test piece also had a strip of mahogany along one edge and as you can see, the effect of the solution on the colour of that was more dramatic.

    I had to make up a fresh solution and decided to leave it for an hour before using it. The mahogany edging on the deck was sealed with sanding sealer as I did not want to darken it. Once this was dry, the weathering solution was wiped on to the deck with a cloth. The two photos of the deck show 'before' and 'after'. The effect is subtle, it has toned down the creamy yellow, making the deck colour look more even without turning the whole thing to a solid grey colour.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Weathering the Deck
    7 days ago by Nerys ( Vice Admiral)
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    Such beautiful precise work in your cabin top etc. You take so much trouble to incorporate everything.

    Cheers, Nerys
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Weathering the Deck
    10 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    That looks excellent Graham, new boats don't always have to look new, all boats weather and get knocked around. Looks like 10yr old teak decking might๐Ÿ‘

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Weathering the Deck
    11 days ago by stevedownunder ( Midshipman)
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    Lovely result Graham,

    This is something I have been playing around with for my Drifters deck, I like your result.๐Ÿ‘

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Deck Hatches
    15 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    The deck has four large openings, three for hatches and one for the cabin. These openings should provide plenty of access to the radio gear installed in the hull.

    The plan calls for coamings (3 x 6 mm) to be glued around the edge of each of the hatch openings. Strips of mahogany were cut to size and mitered on the ends. The mitered corners of the deck planking helped with getting the length of each coaming correct. The bottom edge of the coamings was sanded to match the camber of the deck where necessary.

    I was not happy with the idea of the coaming simply being glued onto the deck so pieces of 1.5mm ply were added to the inside face of the coaming to reinforce the joints.

    With the coamings completed for all three hatches, it was time to move on the making the hatches themselves. Masking tape was carefully applied round the edge of the coaming. This was covered with a piece of cling film and then four hatch edge strips (3 x 6mm) were clamped and glued into position. The masking tape provides a clearance space for the hatch rim to allow space for later painting and the cling film prevents the hatch rim from sticking to the coaming/deck. Arranging the four strips as shown makes it easy to construct a rim for the hatch which is an accurate fit.

    With the four corner joints glued, the rim was carefully raised on cocktail sticks and a 3mm ply panel glued on top. The assembly was weighted down and left overnight and then hatch was removed ( very relieved to find that it wasn't glued to the deck ๐Ÿ‘) and the plywood cover was trimmed and sanded to shape. With the cling film and masking tape removed, the hatch fits smoothly over the coaming.

    The second, central hatch was constructed using the same method. For the forward hatch, I decided to vary the method slightly. The hatch edge strips were shaped to give the hatch a curved top, and left over strips of deck planking were used in place of plywood to form the top.

    With the three hatches complete, it's time to move on to constructing the cabin.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    6 days ago by GaryLC ( Chief Petty Officer 1st Class)
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    Thank you, Graham, I appreciate your comment and that is the road I am going down when I get around to fitting the deck on my Clyde puffer, plus I will try the white vinegar and steel wool aging technique for good measure. That deck of yours is something to be proud of as I can see the time thought and effort that went into the making of it. Regards, Gary.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    6 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Hi Gary,

    Thanks for all the โ€˜likesโ€™ ๐Ÿ‘

    The caulking is black card cut into narrow strips. Got it from a local art/craft shop (before lockdown). It was labelled as โ€˜backing cardโ€™ I think. Itโ€™s about 1mm thick.

    The circular indents in the ends of the planks are intended to represent wooden plugs over the fixings. I made a tool with a sharpened edge to press into planks to create the circles. A piece of brass tube sharpened around the edge would achieve the same result. There is a photo of the tool in the โ€˜Planking Part 2โ€™ post earlier in the blog.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    6 days ago by GaryLC ( Chief Petty Officer 1st Class)
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    I really like the planking very neat and concise absolutely spot on. Two questions if you don't mind, what have you used between the planks as caulking as it looks very good, and what are the small circles on the end of the planks, are they cut off cocktail sticks, as whatever they may be it sure makes for a great looking spot on deck, well done fantastic job there.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    10 days ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Graham A very nice result I have recently finished the three hatches on my police boat. I use the same technique as Rob using a piece of card to to give clearance's of this type, Another tip for a non stick gap is to use a piece of non stick oven liner (a Lakeland product) its reusable and there's no glue that will stick to it.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    13 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks Steve, Rob,

    I canโ€™t claim credit for the method I used to make the hatches. It is based on a method recommended by the designer of the Cutter plan, Gary Webb.

    I am a little concerned that the fit might be a bit tight, but time will tell.๐Ÿ˜‰

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    14 days ago by robbob ( Vice Admiral)
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    Hi Graham.
    The hatches look great ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ˜€.
    I do something similar with thin card to create a clearance gap and found that sometimes you need more clearance than you imagined to allow for paint or stain finishes and the natural expansion and contraction of the wood.
    I aim to end up with a slightly loose fit and use magnets to retain the piece rather than rely on a friction fit.
    Rob.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    15 days ago by stevedownunder ( Midshipman)
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    Lovely hatch Graham,

    I like the approach to constructing it as well.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Deck Hatches
    15 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Very nice job Graham, this is really starting to look something๐Ÿ‘

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ“ Planking the Deck - Part 2
    20 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Planking continued working outwards by adding planks either side of the king plank. Initially short lengths of plank were fitted between the hatches. Some careful cutting and shaping was needed to fit around the hatch trims as the hatches turned out not to be exactly central on the deck. This probably reflects the situation on full sized Cutters as planking like this shows up every little discrepancy. (at least, that's how I convinced myself that it looks OK ๐Ÿ˜‰)

    Once the planks around the hatches were complete, I could move on to fitting longer lengths which speeded up the process somewhat. Where the ends of these longer planks reach the mahogany edging strip, the edge strip was cut to form a 'joggle' for the plank to fit into.

    I had to butt joint the planks for the full length strips. Reading an article on-line about deck planking, the day after I had completed laying the deck, I discovered that I should have staggered the butt joints more than I have, ensuring that each joint is over a different bulkhead. Too late now! โ˜น๏ธ, but at least I know for next time (will there be a next time I wonder ๐Ÿ˜Š)

    Once the planking was all in place, my trusty block plane was used to flatten the surface followed by sanding with progressively finer paper from 80 grit down to 240 grit.

    Looking at photos of full sized Cutters, the deck planks are screwed or bolted down, with a matching wooden plug covering the bolt head. To simulate the appearance of this, I made an embossing tool to mark the planks to imitate the wooden plugs. This tool is simply a length of steel rod hollowed by drilling with a center drill. The outside of the rod was then tapered on the lathe to form a cutting edge. The (imaginary) bulkhead positions were marked on the deck with a pencil line and then the tool gently pressed in to form a ring in each plank.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    9 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Michael,

    I didnโ€™t take it as a criticism ๐Ÿ‘. The planking finish was a bit rough when I laid them and it took a lot of cleaning up as not all the planks were precisely the same thickness. I did think about it after the fact and thought if ever I do another one, I would do it differently next time. The planks need at least to be thicknessed before being laid.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    10 days ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Graham it wasn't a criticism (a bit rough) just an observation of all planking when its first laid down
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    15 days ago by hammer ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    The mast is self supporting, a brass pin fits in a wooden block above the keel. The deck is the other support. The ballast lead chips mixed in cement, and a large block of iron placed after transport. Tangles can be a problem. But when I pack up I roll the stay sails round stays holding with masking tape. I also remove top gaff sail if it has been used not that often. More likely just the one stay sail & the main reffed. Rolled around the boom. As full size. I normally blacken all the brass but on this one wanted a bit of bling. ๐Ÿ˜‚
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    15 days ago by hammer ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    The mast is self supporting, a brass pin fits in a wooden block above the keel. The deck is the other support. The ballast lead chips mixed in cement, and a large block of iron placed after transport.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    15 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks Hammer,

    Thatโ€™s much closer to what I have in mind. I like the idea of fitting chainplates and dead eyes. Hadnโ€™t thought about using elastic cord for the lanyards. Does it provide enough tension in the stays to support the mast?

    Very nice looking model ๐Ÿ‘

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    16 days ago by hammer ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I copied full size practice, but use elastic for the land-yards. To pack for transportation unscrew deck, drop the top mast, pull in bowsprit. This gives enough movement to lift the mast from the block, in the bottom of the boat. The mast is then laid forward and pulled back, so it doesnโ€™t protrude beyond the hull. Not as neat as you model, but it is 10years old. PS I never marked the plank fixings on this model I must do that sometime.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    16 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Hi Graham, re the hooks, good idea not to use them, as I have them on the Optimist and they are a pain in the butt! They get hooked on everything when you are trying to rig the boat and cause stays etc to tangle. Almost impossible to keep everything separated, hence me leaving it rigged permanently.

    If you could incorporate small jamming cleats on tensioners in your stay system it might make things easier to set up. You could make them from hardwood or brown formica (industrial linen/formica is a nice brown colour) it's like a fibre reinforced formica,- also used in full sized boat pulley blocks, - very tough, - machines well. A pic of the thought.

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    17 days ago by robbob ( Vice Admiral)
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    Hi Graham
    Excellent work ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘
    I like the way you have joggled the planks into the perimeter planks, very authentic detailing.
    Also the way you have made up a special tool to 'emboss' the wood plug on the plank fixings...very very effective ๐Ÿ˜€
    As for the planks not being absolutely symmetrical about the hatches...nothing to worry about !!
    As often said to me in similar circumstances.... " A blind man would love to see that".....๐Ÿ˜‰
    Rob.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    17 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Hi JB,

    Thanks for the rigging suggestions, a few things for me to think about there.

    The plan calls for wire clips on the end of the stays. These are referred to as 'Pelican hooks'. These clip through holes in the bulwark. I'm not planning to do it this way as I would rather use something that looks a bit more true to scale.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    18 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Hi Graham, re rigging,- a few thoughts,- you could make your boom and gaff so they can swing upwards, and make quick release clips at the heads of your foresails. If you used tensioners (small 3 hole tent guy type) on your stays, you can slacken them off without removing anything, slacken and unclip the tops of the foresails, lay them back on the deck, -fold up the boom and gaff and tie them, then lift the mast out (given enough slack) and lay that on a crutch on the deck.

    I did a similar thing on my 18ft A class cat, (25ft mast) using a double 2 sheave pulley system on the side stays, with a jamming cleat on the top pulley, so I could leave them attached to aid with stepping the mast (slackening them just enough to flip the mast round to the step). I've done the same sort of thing with the day-sailer and it works well

    Looked at your plan, but a bit hard to see everything. Guess it will be another challenge to sort out, (it'll keep you busy for a bit longer๐Ÿ˜) Pic might give you an idea for something similar. I've used the stay tensioners on a model cat years ago and it made rigging it really quick and easy( just had the tensioners through hooks which attached to eyes in the deck.

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    18 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks everyone for the 'Likes' and the comments. It really is appreciated.

    Martin: I'm enjoying the build, but not the temperature in the workshop first thing in the day. โ˜น๏ธ It takes around 2 hours to become bearable once I have lit the stove ๐Ÿ”ฅ

    Nerys: Thanks for the reassurance on the butt offset on the planking. It's good to know some boats have it the way I have done. It won't be so obvious once all the rest of the deck fittings are in place.

    JB: thanks. I have a Wee Nip which I sailed whenever I could last year, but this beast is going to be a whole lot different. Because of it's size, I won't be able to transport it fully rigged so I'm trying to work out how to rig it quickly at the pond side.

    Michael: The initial planking looked very rough as the planks were just sawn, not planed, but it has cleaned up nicely.

    Stephen: "Anyone who never made a mistake, never made anything" I keep reminding myself of that ๐Ÿ˜†

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    19 days ago by stevedownunder ( Midshipman)
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    Hi Graham,

    Lovely work, your deck looks fantastic, I agree with Martin no one would have noticed the problem if you hadn't pointed it out.

    I am glad that I am not the only person who finds out what I have just done is not quite right.

    Life is full of little lessons...

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    19 days ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Nice work Graham, planking is my favourite part of a build, its so satisfying seeing the initial laid planks looking "a bit rough" then the transformation when its sanded and lacquered
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    19 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Would have expected nothing less Graham, beautifully done. Like the way you've done the nibbed ends on the margin plank, very smart! Love the contrasting woods, and also the clever 'fastening plug tool', looks very neat . This is going to look terrific, and I'm sure if you get the sailing bug (not the chinflu bug๐Ÿ˜€) there will be a next time๐Ÿ˜.

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    20 days ago by Nerys ( Vice Admiral)
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    Hi Graham,

    What an excellent job you are making of the cutter. That's as good a laid deck as I've seen in a long time. Don't worry about having butts in alternate runs of planking, I have often seen decks laid like that on full size Thames Barges. I look forward to the rest of your build and certainly of the proof of the pudding when we see her sailing.

    Cheers, Nerys
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 2
    20 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Graham,
    The decking looks absolutely fantastic.
    As for the hatches not being central, i think if you had not mentioned it i doubt that anyone would of noticed.

    Excellent workmanship yet again.
    I am enjoying this build log, keep it coming.

    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    I decided to plank the deck for several reasons. The recycled ply I've used for the hull and deck is too dark to represent the typical deck found on Pilot Cutters. It is also too dark to be able to draw imitation planking on it. Finally, I like a challenge ๐Ÿ˜€

    The first task was to add a contrasting border round the edge of the deck. I used mahogany for this. To follow the curve of the deck, I used three strips 3 x 2 mm glued side by side. This was easier than using a single wider strip which would have to have been fitted in multiple pieces each cut to a curve to follow the hull shape. At the stern, a wider strip of mahogany was cut to match the shape of the transom.

    I am trying to build this boat using timber I have available in the workshop rather than buying any more. There is no point in storing it and not using it.๐Ÿ™„ For the deck planking I decided to use lime, and I just happened to have a large block of lime left over from the time, many years ago, when I took up wood carving as a hobby. This block is around 20" in length which, at the scale I'm working at, would give scale planks around 20 ft long which seems reasonable. With a heavy coarse blade fitted to the bandsaw, several boards were cut from the block. The bandsaw blade was then changed for a new fine cut blade and the planks were split down into strips measuring 7 x 2 mm.

    With the raw material prepared, and the deck clamped in position on the hull, a start was made on the planking by fitting planks to frame the openings in the deck. A 6mm piece of oak was shaped and glued in place to reinforce the hole in the deck for the mast. Next, strips of black card were glued to the edges of the planks to simulate caulking. Map pins holding the card in place while the glue sets. A wide plank was then fitted in pieces along the centerline of the deck to represent the king plank. The straightedge was used to ensure that the pieces were in line.

    Finally a start was made on fitting the planks. Each plank is trimmed to length and glued in place with waterproof PVA. Once the glue has dried, a strip of black card is superglued to the exposed edge of the plank, and then the process is repeated. This is going to be a long, slow job.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    24 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Hi JB,

    Three days on and Iโ€™m still adding planks๐Ÿ™„ At least now I can see some progress. ๐Ÿ‘ still more to do.๐Ÿ‘Ž

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    24 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Sounds familiar Graham, days of work with not much to show for it๐Ÿ˜

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    25 days ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Hi Graham I like the thought of using what is available rather than buying new all the time, you always seem to buy more than you need ending up with an excess of materials. I've just finished a few weeks ago the planking of the police boat but have not written it up yet.
    My next post will detail the process I use.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Hi JB,

    Iโ€™m not โ€˜speed buildingโ€™, Iโ€™m adding pieces slowly, but just spending a ridiculous number of hours doing it. ๐Ÿคฃ๐Ÿ˜‚ That gives the impression of a rapid build. Yesterday I spent 5 hours in the workshop planking, and I couldnโ€™t see much difference at the end of the day. Iโ€™ll be glad when the planking is finished and I can get on with some of the more interesting stuff.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Going to look very nice when finished Graham๐Ÿ‘. Is speed building the latest thing in modelling?๐Ÿ˜

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Well Graham being a Captain definitely won't improve your model making skills LOL!!
    There is not a rank high enough to match your skill level.

    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Hi Ian,

    Planking isnโ€™t difficult. Itโ€™s just very time consuming and repetitive. The key is to try and fit every plank as well, or better than the first. Donโ€™t let errors creep in as you get more and more bored with doing the same task over and over ๐Ÿ˜‚.

    Using strip wood available from the model boat suppliers makes it easier and quicker, if a bit more expensive.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks Martin,
    Not sure what difference being a Captain makes. I guess Iโ€™lol just keep plodding on ๐Ÿ˜†

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Hi Rob,

    Glad you are enjoying the build. I learnt the planking technique from your Crash Tender blog. ๐Ÿ‘

    Fortunately (?) this deck is so large that by the time Iโ€™ve finished adding a set of planks from one end to the other, the glue has almost dried where I started and I can start the next set. ๐Ÿ™„

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Ianh ( Lieutenant Commander)
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    Hi Graham,
    I like your post on planking as I have possibly three models to plank ( 2 are refurbishments). Very helpful and gives me a bit of insight into this black art๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by robbob ( Vice Admiral)
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    Hi Graham.
    I'm really enjoying reading your build blog it's well written and photographed ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘
    I've found the process of planking laborious but very satisfying when it's all sanded back and lacquered.
    As you say, the worst part is waiting for the glue to set !
    Be positive ....perhaps a good thing that you've got a little more time to spend on it ๐Ÿ˜‰
    Rob.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Planking the Deck - Part 1
    27 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Congratulations Captain Graham93 On your well deserved promotion.

    As for the deck planking it may take a bit of time but i think it will look fantastic when it is completed.


    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Rudder
    30 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    To support the rudder, a sub assembly comprising the rudder support block and servo mount was first assembled on the bench. According to the plans, the rudder shaft is supposed to run through a hole drilled through the support block - the assembly to be greased to protect the timber from water ingress. I decided instead to line the hole in the support block with a length of 6mm I/D brass tube. The bottom end of the support block was cut at an angle to match the hull shape.

    The center section of bulkhead 5 was cut away to make room for the sub assembly. This part of the bulkhead had not been reinforced with epoxy fillets, and the bulkhead was partly cut through before hull assembly to make removal of the center section easier. A hole was drilled through the bottom of the hull and the sub assembly was then glued into place. A length of threaded rod, together with the offcut from the bottom end of the support block were used to clamp the assembly into position while the glue set. A piece of polythene was used on the outside of the hull to prevent the offcut sticking to the hull.

    Once set, the brass tube protruding through the hull was trimmed to length and a flanged brass collar added to give a flat bearing surface for an o-ring seal. A similar flanged collar was added to the top of the tube inside the hull. All the glued joints were reinforced with thickened epoxy resin.

    The rudder itself is constructed from a piece of 3mm ply and a 6mm aluminium shaft. The top end of the shaft was threaded for an M6 wingnut. 3mm aluminium cross pieces pass through holes drilled in the shaft. The profile of this assembly was traced onto the plywood and cut out so that the assembly could be glued in place. Both sides of the rudder were then filled with a two part wood filer and sanded to shape.

    The completed rudder, together with an o-ring were trial fitted to the hull. Inside the hull, a second o-ring is fitted to the top of the rudder shaft followed by a tiller arm held in place with a wingnut. The threaded end of the rudder shaft has a flat filed on it, and the hole in the tiller arm was filed to a corresponding 'D' shape. Using a wingnut to hold the rudder in position makes it easy to remove for transport, if necessary.

    Finally, the rudder servo was tried in position. The push/pull control rods are still to be made.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Rudder
    28 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    JB,

    With the latest announcement from the UK government Iโ€™m going to have plenty of time to work on this in January.โ˜น๏ธ

    Now in full lockdown (Tier 4). Shops, pubs, restaurants are closed. Only allowed to leave home for essential purposes. Fortunately, leaving home to go to my workshop in the garden is permitted ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Rudder
    29 days ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Don't worry Graham, at this rate you'll have it done by January 2021๐Ÿ˜‚

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Rudder
    30 days ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks Martin,

    Glad you are enjoying the blog. Iโ€™m certainly enjoying the build, although the more I do, the more I realise there is still to do. It feels a bit overwhelming at present.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Rudder
    30 days ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Graham,
    This blog gets more interesting every instalment.
    Your build is also school lessons for me.
    You never know with your tutelage i might be more knowledgable about sail boats by the time you have finished.
    Keep it coming.

    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Stem
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Now that the basic hull is complete, a simple stand was constructed on which to place the hull for the rest of the assembly.

    With the hull safely on the stand the first task was to add Gunnel strips to the top edge of the hull side panels to strengthen them and avoid damage during the remainder of the construction. A 20mm x 3mm strip was cut from the edge of a mahogany board. This strip was then split to give two gunnel strips, each 6mm x 3mm. These were glued to the hull side panels with waterproof PVA and clamped in place until the glue set. No joints were needed as each strip was long enough to fit as a single piece along either side.

    A simple cutwater made from 3mm ply was added to the bottom of the hull and the shape flared in with two part wood filler.

    For the Stem itself, a 3mm piece of brass was cut and drilled to form the two eyes which will be needed to attach the Headstay and Jib stay. The brass was let into a piece of oak which was sandwiched between two more pieces. The whole assembly being glued and trenailed together using more cocktail sticks. Once set, it was cleaned up ready to be fitted to the hull. The location of the stem was marked on to the hull sides and that section of hull was carefully removed by sawing with a tenon saw (sorry no photo - I was concentrating too much on this and forgot !). With the hole made in the hull, the stem was tacked into position with superglue and then the joint reinforced on the inside with thickened epoxy resin.

    Finally, two brass tubes were installed below the stem for later attachment of the bobstay fitting.

    I hadn't been looking forward to cutting the hole in the hull for the stem, but it worked out OK in the end.

    Time to take a break for Christmas. Whilst we won't be seeing family tomorrow, I don't think my wife will be too pleased if I disappear into the workshop for the day.๐Ÿ™„ Hopefully Santa will be bringing my winch servos so that is something to look forward to ๐Ÿ˜€.

    Hope you all have a great day, stay safe

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Stem
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    JB,

    I will need a few. I gave up counting when I got to 20๐Ÿ˜ฎ and that was just the single blocks. There are also several doubles needed. Still considering different ways of making them.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Stem
    1 month ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Those will look nice once finished and varnished up Graham, guess you have to make a few. Just a suggestion, how about using a wad punch for the block outers, and cut them from thin ply and laminate them to the desired thickness. You could custom make a wad punch from thick wall brass tube squashed to shape and sharpened. That way they should be uniform and save a lot of 'blue air'๐Ÿ˜. You could soak the ply first to soften it. pic- an example of some punches for leather available. (these were on the Wish website)

    Think I've almost recovered from lunch yesterday, hope yours was good.

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Stem
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    JB,

    Thanks for the link, could come in useful. I plan to try and make most of the fittings from scratch if I can, but I'm not sure some of them will be possible with the equipment I have. I did have a play a couple of days ago at block making. Still some way to go with this before I'm happy with it.

    Sounds like you had a good Christmas lunch. Mine is in the oven. Hope your stomach recovers soon. ๐Ÿ˜ด๐Ÿ˜ด

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Stem
    1 month ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Like the custom chain plates Graham, nice touch!
    These might be of interest? if they are the correct scale they might save some work.

    Have a great Xmas!

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Stem
    1 month ago by philcaretaker ( Lieutenant)
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    Great progress Graham ! - Best wishes to you and your good lady ! ๐Ÿ‘
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Stem
    1 month ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    You don't hang about Graham.
    Nice work.

    Have a Merry Christmas you deserve a bit of time off.

    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ“ Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    To continue with assembly of the hull, the deck panel was trimmed slightly until it would fit in the hull, resting on the top of the bulkheads and the support blocks that had been glued to the side walls. Very little trimming was needed to get this to fit, which is a testament to the quality of the plans. Stiffeners were added to the underside of the deck and it was then clamped back into position - but not glued. The hull is not yet rigid so clamping the deck into position helps ensure that everything is maintained square.

    With the deck in position, the hull was inverted and supported on a flat surface so that the floor skins could be fitted. The skins needed to be trimmed to fit, especially around the protruding fin box. This took a while as I did not want to remove more than necessary. It was difficult to hold both skins in position and to tape one down while trimming the other to fit. Eventually an acceptable fit was achieved and both skins were tacked in place with superglue. The seam along the centerline and around the fin box was filled with epoxy.

    Next the hull was turned the right way up, the deck was removed and all the internal seams reinforced with thickened epoxy resin. Finally, once the resin had been left to set, the bottom panels, and the protruding fin box, were trimmed flush.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Michael,

    โ€œI recon at this rate it will be in the water before the end of the yearโ€

    Yes, but which year? ๐Ÿ˜ Certainly not 2020. Hopefully sometime in 2021. At present, as I think through the build, the list of bits to be made and fitted is growing every day. Canโ€™t see an end to it. At least it will keep me busy as we move into Tier 3 lockdown on Saturday.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Hi Graham I recon at this rate it will be in the water before the end of the year, Your still rubbing it in with pictures of that really nice plane,
    ๐Ÿ˜ How about giving it a fellow member as a Christmas present๐Ÿ˜
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks Rob,

    The basic hull has come together quite quickly, but there is still a long way to go. Might be ready to sail by the time we have all been vaccinated ๐Ÿ™„.

    Iโ€™m gradually sanding off the french polish. Itโ€™s not a good finish for surfaces that are going to get wet. ๐Ÿ˜†

    I used โ€˜milled carbon fibreโ€™ to thicken the epoxy resin, thatโ€™s why it is black. Bought it with the resin from Easy Composites.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Going great guns there Graham, looking good. Obviously designed to be a developable surface build. looks very similar to my 15ft, 1950s US Schock designed 'Sharon Potts' day sailer (just a bit broader). Will probably have similar sailing characteristics as well. I have never had mine planing, despite being out in around 18 knots down wind with jib and main up. The boat just sucks down and sails. Surprisingly fast in light winds as well (has the equivalent rig of a 2 man 470 Olympic dinghy) The guy who designed my boat, Edson I Schock, was a naval architect and did a lot of work on developable surfaces for small boats. He also wrote a book on the subject in the 50s.

    I think it's going to be a real nice sailer.

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by robbob ( Vice Admiral)
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    Hi Graham.
    Excellent and rapid progress๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘.
    I have to say that it's quite unique to see a 'French Polished' hull at such an early stage of construction ๐Ÿ˜†.
    What did you use to thicken the epoxy used on the internal seams?
    Rob.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Martin,

    I donโ€™t know much about sailboats either!, but I can follow a plan, and use a saw ๐Ÿ˜. I do have a Wee Nip that I built this time last year. It has a single sail and rudder so couldnโ€™t be much simpler to build or sail. Iโ€™ve enjoyed learning to sail with that, and Iโ€™m still learning. Sailing is a completely different challenge compared to a powered boat ( or a rowing boat ๐Ÿ˜†) as everything is dependant on the wind.

    I donโ€™t have any prior experience with full sized sailboats so itโ€™s been interesting spending time researching different Cutter designs to learn about the sail arrangement, rigging and deck fittings. Iโ€™m sure Iโ€™m going to need lots of advice on these from the members here as this build progresses.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Thanks Nerys,

    Itโ€™s going together well so far. The plans have proven to be accurate and quite straightforward, despite being โ€˜hard chineโ€™ ๐Ÿ˜ 

    Now Iโ€™m getting over the shock of how big she will be, the hull shape does look good.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Graham,
    She is certainly coming along nicely.
    Altho i know absolutely nothing about sail boats i am finding this blog very interesting.
    Keep it coming.

    Martin555.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 2
    1 month ago by Nerys ( Vice Admiral)
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    I can't help being deeply impressed with every photo I see of this superb build. Despite being hard chine, she is a fine shape and gives me the impression she will sail well, keep up the good work and keep the pictures coming.

    Cheers, Nerys
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    ๐Ÿ“ Hull Assembly Part 1
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    With the keel box completed it is time to start building the hull around it. At last, it's time to see all these parts come together ๐Ÿ‘

    First bulkheads 2 and 3 are glued and screwed to the keel box. Both the bulkheads and the keel box have been marked up with locating lines as shown on the plan to ensure everything goes together in the correct place. Care is taken to ensure the two bulkheads are square to the keel box, and the assembly left for the glue to set.

    The mast step, to locate the base of the main mast is constructed next. It sits on a protrusion at the forward end of the keel box. The assembly is glued and pinned with cocktail sticks. Once the glue has set, it was cleaned up. All the corners are rounded off to reduce the risk of the rigging sheets passing through the hull becoming snagged. The hole in the top of the mast step is to locate the foot of the mast.

    The hull sides and the transom are taped together. The inside faces of the panels have been marked up with the location of all the bulkheads. Small support blocks are glued along the deck line. The keel box assembly with its attached bulkheads is then placed between the side sheets and positioned using the marked bulkhead locations. The top edges of the bulkheads are aligned to the line showing the deck level. Once in the correct position, the bulkheads are tacked to the side panels with superglue.

    The hull is supported on blocks to lift the keel box clear of the worktop taking care that everything is level and square and the remaining bulkheads are positioned on their locating marks and fixed with superglue. I managed to fit them all the right way round!

    Now I get chance to stand back and realise just how big this model is ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

    Next, fitting the bottom panels...
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 1
    1 month ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    I've got 4 projects on the go at the moment Graham, (3 individual pieces for 1 project)- don't think my brain could handle 5๐Ÿ˜‚

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 1
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Martin, Michael,

    I prefer using โ€˜trenailsโ€™ when constructing a model as they donโ€™t need hammering in, and the donโ€™t blunt your tools when cleaning up the joints like metal nails do ๐Ÿ˜ . Cocktail sticks work well and are cheap and readily available. Havenโ€™t tried bamboo barbecue sticks but they would be even stronger.

    Graham93
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 1
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Go on John, you know you want to...๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿคฃ
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 1
    1 month ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Looking very nice so far Graham. I can see it's going to have your usual 'cabinetmakers' touch. Makes me want to start something now๐Ÿ˜

    JB
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 1
    1 month ago by mturpin013 ( Commodore)
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    Don't you just love cocktail sticks ๐Ÿ˜€ don't forget the bamboo barbecue sticks for the bigger jobs.
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    ๐Ÿ’ฌ Re: Hull Assembly Part 1
    1 month ago by Martin555 ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Hi Graham,
    I like the wood nails.
    Even at this stage of the build you make it look so clean and tidy with that professional Finnish.
    Nice work.


    Martin555.
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